Cambridge Edition January 2021 - Web

YOU R MON T H L Y F I X OF

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IDEAS & INSPIRATION FOR STARTING THE YEAR RIGHT

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EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Editorial assistant Frances McNaughton 01223 499469 francesmcnaughton@bright-publishing.com Editorial director Roger Payne Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Sub editor Elisha Young Junior sub editor Jack Nason ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Lucy McNally 01223 492248 lucymcnally@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Sam Adams, Charlotte Griffiths, Alex Rushmer & Anna Taylor DESIGN & PRODUCTION Senior designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com Designer Emma Di’Iuorio MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

e’ve finally seen the back of 2020, a year that will go down in the history books as momentously dreadful. And while ‘normal’ still feels a long way off – there’s definitely a light at the end of the tunnel and a tentative feeling of hope in the air as we move into the new year.

Confidence seems to be returning to venues and event organisers here in Cambridge, with a handful of summer festivals announcing their 2021 plans and both the Junction and Corn Exchange dipping their toes into socially distant gigs (find out more in our What’s On pages). The hospitality sector, bruised but not beaten, soldiers on, with restaurants continuing to manoeuvre around restrictions and come up with brilliant new ways of getting their food to us. Against all odds, we’re also experiencing a small influx of new openings, as we discover in Ones to Watch. A stalwart for Cambridge Edition ’s first issue of the year, this feature sees us looking into our crystal ball to predict the people and places that will be shaping the city’s food scene in the months to come. From artisan sauce makers to the ‘Fin Boys’ behind Mill Road’s sleek new fish bar and deli, meet 2021’s foodie movers and shakers on page 27. If you’re in need of some self-care (aren’t we all?), check out our wellbeing wonders wish list on page 55, which contains more than 20 tried and tested ideas for relaxing and recharging. Perhaps you’re among the millions who will be taking a break from booze and participating in Dry January? If so, we’ve got some fabulous recommendations for alcohol-free drinks, shop-bought and DIY, on page 40, while Veganuary-ers can check out a round- up of the city’s top plant-based eateries on page 45. We’ve also got recipes for some irresistible sweet treats on page 38 (I can’t wait

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to try the rose and pistachio doughnuts!), news on Cambridge Film Festival’s virtual programme (page 22) and some fantastic new books to curl up with (page 20). Enjoy the issue and see you next month! Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Laura Bryant , senior designer at Bright Publishing

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8 ● STARTERS A wishlist from local indies, plus our top social media pics for January 13 ● WHAT’S ON January’s round-up of exciting arts news, events and exhibitions 20 ● BOOK CLUB Get the lowdown on some recent releases in this month’s Edition Book Club 22 ● ONLINE FILM FESTIVAL Cambridge Film Festival has launched a year of online events to look forward to 27 ● ONES TO WATCH The Cambridge eateries and enterprises stepping up to the plate in 2021 37 ● CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer shares what he’s most looking forward to eating this year 38 ● RECIPES The Wren Kitchens team whips up some indulgent New Year treats 40 ● DRY JANUARY With these non-alcoholic options on offer, Dry January’s never been easier

45 ● VEGANUARY VENUES Going vegan this month? Be sure to try out these five plant-based staples 47 ● FOOD NEWS The latest gastro goings-on in Cambridge, plus our hero eats for January 52 ● GET ON COURSE Why not seize that new year feeling and sign up to a class? Here are some ideas 55 ● HEALTH & WELLNESS Look after yourself this year with our top picks for products and experiences

64 ● CHARITY OF THE YEAR East Anglian Air Ambulance on the charity’s vital work and how you can help 70 ● INDIE OF THE MONTH Cleaning company Art of Clean talks us through its client-focused approach 73 ● GARDENS Anna Taylor gives her best tips to keep your garden looking great 77 ● PROPERTY SPECIAL The region’s top developers offer advice for buying and renting in 2021

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STARTERS

@TOMATTRIDGE

@CAMBRIDGEPURPLE

@ONESUMMERINCAMBRIDGE

OUR FAVOURI TE CAMBRIDGE INSTAGRAM PICS OF THE MONTH. HASHTAG # INSTACAMB FOR A CHANCE TO FEATURE !

FOLLOW @CAMBSEDITION ON INSTAGRAM FOR MORE GREAT PICS OF CAMBRIDGE

NEW LAUNCH! INSPIRED KITCHENS

In partnership with the Ely Planning Company Cambridgeshire, Inspired Kitchens Cambridge is a newly founded company offering a personalised, contemporary kitchen design service. With over 40 years’ design experience, the team will use their extensive knowledge of the kitchen industry and space planning to bring your new kitchen to life. The system is simple: first you’ll have your initial consultation, where you can work out which style of kitchen and design you require, then the team will provide you with a home measure service at a time that suits you, ensuring impeccable accuracy and maximised personalisation. You’ll then be able to visualise your new kitchen thanks to the company’s photographic design software, and can make any changes you require before your new kitchen is put in place by a team of skilled installers. If you’re looking into a new kitchen in the new year, you’re in luck – Inspired Kitchens has several sales on throughout January. Head to the website for design ideas, or to request an appointment at the new showroom in Haslingfield. inspiredkitchenscambridge.co.uk

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STARTERS

ALEX MONROE GOLD- PLATED BUMBLEBEE NECKLACE £150, Podarok, Peas Hill

NAKED CLAY CERAMICS SET OF 5 VESSELSWITH TRAY £70, Kettle’s Yard, Castle Street

CHOCOLATE BAR BUNDLE OF TWO £14.58, La Petite Maison

THIS MONTH’S MUST-HAVES FROM LOCAL INDIES

RITA LIGHTNING SPARK SWEATER £49, Lilac Rose, Bridge Street

TETRAD FF WAFFLE CHAIR £809–£989, Angela Reed, Peas Hill

LEOPARD VELVET

TRAVEL POUCH £24.95, Lilac Rose, Bridge Street

MANY FACES POPPER PURSE £12.50, Ark, Peas Hill

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WHAT ’ S ON • ED I T ION BOOK CLUB • CAMBR I DGE F I LM F EST I VAL

IMAGE Hand sculpture by Auguste Rodin, part of The Human Touch exhibition at The Fitzwilliam

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CULTURE CLUB

ILLUSTRATING ANCIENT HISTORY Running until the end of January, Illustrating Ancient History: Bringing the Past to the Present is an exhibition of archaeological illustrations at the Museum of Classical Archaeology. Inspired by the Faculty of Classics’ research project, Impact of the Ancient City, the exhibition aims to explore archaeological practice in our current times, featuring artworks intended to inspire interest in the classical past, such as colourful and eye-catching drawings by Zofia Guertin and Sofia Greaves, that bring archaeology to life. Javier Martínez Jiménez, the exhibition curator, says: “We are really proud to have put this exhibition together under extraordinary circumstances. Our aim was to show people how archaeologists can use images to help archaeological digs make sense. But that’s not all! We want to start a conversation about how people think about their heritage, which is why we’ve set up a questionnaire that people can respond to, whether or not they come to our exhibition.” Catch the exhibition until 30 January – admission is free and tickets can be booked through the Museum of Classical Archaeology’s website. classics.cam.ac.uk/museum

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CULTURE CLUB

BOAT RACE 2021 TO BE RACED AT ELY The Boat Race Company Limited (BRCL) has announced that next year’s world-famous boat race between Oxford and Cambridge is taking place on the Great Ouse at Ely. The event, scheduled for 4 April 2021, comprises of the 166th Men’s and the 75th Women’s boat races. Working with local authorities to ensure a safe event for the local community, crews and coaches, as well as the volunteers and contractors helping to stage the races, the BRCL is tackling the challenge of organising a high-profile amateur event. Covid-related restrictions and uncertainty regarding the safety and navigation of Hammersmith Bridge led to consultations with long-term partners in London, East Cambridge District Council and the Environment Agency, with a decision to relocate the 2021 event. “Everyone is facing significant challenges right now, especially students up and down the country. Organising sport safely and responsibly is our highest priority and moving The Boat Race to Ely in 2021 enables the event to go ahead in a secure environment,” explains Dr George Gilbert, chair of BRCL’s race and operations committee. “While we are sad that we can’t welcome the usual hundreds of thousands of spectators along the course, we’re inviting our wider audience to get involved via our social media channels, and to enjoy the historic event on the BBC.” Spectators are encouraged to get involved at home, enjoying the event while respecting any restrictions that may be in place at the time. For more information about The Boat Race, visit the official website or follow The Boat Race on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. theboatrace.org

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CULTURE CLUB

CAMBRIDGE CORN EXCHANGE LAUNCHES SOCIALLY DISTANCED PROGRAMME Just in time for the new year, the Corn Exchange’s programme of socially distanced concerts are sure to be music to the ears of many Cambridge concert- lovers. Featuring artists such as This Is The Kit (21 January) and Scott Matthews (22 January) – in partnership with the Cambridge Folk Festival – plus BC Camplight (26 January), Penelope Isles (30 January) and Shame (17 February), the shows mark a refreshing return to evening entertainment in the city. After closing in March, alongside thousands of venues nationwide, the Corn Exchange recently received a grant of more than £400,000 from Arts Council England’s Culture Recovery Fund, enabling shows to be planned again. Strict social distancing guidelines are going to be in place, with a maximum of 200 audience members per show, and there’s a money- back guarantee in case the show is cancelled. “I’m thrilled to be able to announce this news,” says Anna Smith, executive councillor for communities. “I know so many people have missed live entertainment, and I feel sure many Cambridge residents are delighted to see the first signs of a return to live entertainment. Council officers have been hard at work preparing for this moment for months, and we look forward to welcoming audiences back to the Corn Exchange from January.” To book tickets and stay up to date with the latest news from the Corn Exchange, head to the website. cornex.co.uk

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40 WOMEN FOR DOWNING After briefly closing during lockdown, a free exhibition by beloved illustrator Quentin Blake is once again open for visitors at the Heong Gallery. 40 Women for Downing is an exclusive collection of drawings by Blake – consisting of 40 portraits of imagined female students – to mark 40 years since Downing College admitted its first female undergraduates, back in 1980. Until that point, all Cambridge colleges had been single sex, with only two colleges for women. Shortly thereafter, the rest of the historically all-male university colleges followed suit and, by 1988, all of them had begun accepting women as full members. The exhibition celebrates the strides women have taken towards equality, and invites viewers to reflect on how far we have come, as well as how far we still have to go. You can also browse more of Blake’s drawings at the exhibition, including Wayward Locks – a series of whimsical sketches – and Matilda at 30, a collection of drawings of Roald Dahl’s classic heroine imagined in eight different professions. 40 Women for Downing is running until 7 February. You can find more information on the Downing College website, and timed tickets must be booked in advance via Eventbrite. dow.cam.ac.uk

CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING Wondering what to do with your tree now that Christmas is over? The Arthur Rank Hospice Charity is once again running its Christmas Tree Recycling Scheme, covering postcodes from CB1 through to CB24. Volunteers come and take away your tree, saving you the hassle of sorting it out (and all to raise money for charity!). You can also register to volunteer a few hours of your own time to help out – registration is open until 5 January. Head to the Arthur Rank Hospice website for more information. ahrc.org.uk/tree-recycling

CAMBRIDGE VEGAN MARKET

On Saturday 23 January, catch Cambridge’s first vegan market of 2021. Held in the city centre at the Cambridge Guildhall, the huge market is set to feature more than 40 stalls, selling ethical and sustainable products from a selection of local businesses, as well as some eminent artisans from further afield. In addition to the stalls offering delicious vegan fare, there are also eco-lifestyle brands, luxury cosmetics, ethical clothing and jewellery, plus charities and crafts. All of the stalls are going to be spaced out to keep everybody safe, and the market is running from 10.30am until 4pm. For more information and updates, keep an eye on the Cambridge Vegan Market Facebook event page.

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WORTH THE WEIGHT After a sell-out pop- up at St Paul’s Church last October, Worth the Weight returns for another vintage kilo sale on Saturday 16 January. Head along to find vintage pieces from the 1960s to the 1990s, with items starting from just 75p! You can book tickets online, with general admission priced at £1.50, or for £3, you can get an early bird slot and enter a five kilo prize draw. buytickets.at/ worththeweight

The Human Touch: Making Art, Leaving Traces is a new exhibition at the FitzwilliamMuseum that explores the role of touch in human experience. This exploration incorporates works of art spanning 4,000 years from across the globe, looking at the ways that humans have used and still use touch to leave a mark on and find a place in the world. Ancient Egyptian limestone sculptures stand alongside panel paintings and medieval manuscripts, including re-analysed pieces from historically significant artists such as Rembrandt, Michelangelo and Rodin. Plus, there’s work frommore contemporary artists like Frank Auerbach, Judy Chicago and Donald Rodney. The exhibition is open until 3 May – head to the FitzwilliamMuseum website to find out more and book tickets (admission is free). fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk THE HUMAN TOUCH

Fancy helping to fill the streets with colour and light this month? Well now you can, with this year’s WindowWanderland. Organised by Cambridge City Council, this is the first time the event has been held in Cambridge, adding to the list of cities that have participated since the first event was held in Bristol in 2015. Last year, we saw windows up and down the country come to life with cheerful rainbow displays, helping to keep spirits up during what was a particularly trying 12 months. This January’s WindowWanderland provides a chance for the local community to come together again, creating glowing galleries to illuminate the city’s streets after dark. You are welcome to transform the windows of your home, business, school or shop, or you could even take part by decorating the windows of your car or front door. If you’d like to take part, you can sign up on the WindowWanderland event page (it’s free), so that your window can be mapped on the website to create a local trail. Anyone with access to a street-facing window is invited to join in, and it’s running from 11 to 24 January. You can find plenty of ideas and inspiration for your window display on the WindowWanderland website. windowwanderland.com/gallery WINDOW WANDERLAND

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BOOK CLUB

CAMBRIDGE EDI T ION

WITH DARKER NIGHTS ON THE HORIZON FOR A FEW MORE MONTHS, GETTING LOST IN A BRILLIANT BOOK IS A SURE-FIRE WAY TO PASS AN ENJOYABLE EVENING. HERE’S A ROUND-UP OF SOME RECENT RELEASES TO ADD TO YOUR LIST

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

MEMORIAL BY BRYAN WASHINGTON

On paper, this book’s set-up feels like the most unlikely situation – yet as Terry Pratchett wrote, “million-to-one chances crop up nine times out of ten.” In this case Benson, a black nursery teacher, and his boyfriend Mike, a Japanese-American chef, are avoiding discussing their dwindling relationship when Mike decides to travel to Japan to say goodbye to his estranged, dying father. Unfortunately for Benson, Mike’s mother, Mitsuko, has arrived in Texas for a visit a few hours before Mike decides to leave for the other side of the world. After days of silence, Benson and Mitsuko slowly become unlikely room-mates: connecting in ways they could not have foreseen – while in Japan, Mike discovers the truth about his parents and, by extension, himself. Once the anger and hurt subsides, there’s a lot of love in these characters’ worlds: they just might have been looking in the wrong places.

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BOOK CLUB

VICTORIA PARK BY GEMMA REEVES

particularly delicious) and immediately transport you into the midst of a deli, a party, a break-in – showing you how others see the same space, and highlighting the differences and similarities between us all. Throughout it all is the park itself, its ancient trees standing by as people’s tragedies, romances, heartbreaks and happinesses play out in a flicker against their silent background. A beautiful gift for anyone who’s lost their heart to one of London’s green spaces: another one to read before it becomes a series.

Everyone enjoys people watching: wondering why others are in the same restaurant or sat in an airport terminal is a brilliantly creative way to pass time. Here, Gemma Reeves has spun out this pastime into a beautiful and affecting book that takes the form of a series of vignettes based around the lives of people connected with Victoria Park, and therefore – sometimes unknowingly – connected with each other. The short stories are beautifully rendered, packed with detail, texture and flavour (the food writing is

IMAGES From beautiful short stories to chilling family dramas, there are some great new releases to enjoy this winter

“A beautiful and affecting book that takes the form of vignettes”

BY ASHLEY AUDRAIN THE PUSH

I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of The Push last year. I finished it in one sitting, then thought about hiding my Kindle in the freezer, mentally listing the new mothers and pregnant friends who I’ll gently usher past this novel – at least until their babies are slightly older. The Push is staggering – it is an intoxicating rush of a book that grips you tight from the first few pages and will not let you go. A creeping sense of dread builds throughout, offset by the smothering, bewildering and conflicting waves of emotion that narrator Blythe feels toward her new baby daughter, Violet. “These are thoughts I never let leave my lips,” she says. “These are thoughts most mothers don’t have.” This searing book explores what happens when your most base instincts clash: would you trust your terrified gut, or your responsibility to nurture your daughter? Blythe’s recollections of her own traumatic childhood, and in turn her mother’s experiences with her own mother, are interspersed with sinister scenes where the infant Violet seems to (could she?) be deliberately – almost malevolently – driving a wedge between her parents. “We were supposed to want each other,” Blythe says early on, but her fear of and obsession with

her daughter and her own unmaternal behaviour only grows, with devastating consequences. “I was embarrassed that we’d created a human being who would act this way,” Blythe thinks during a meeting with a teacher. Comparisons with the classic We Need to Talk About Kevin are correctly made. Read it before it’s inevitably turned into a film or box set: but maybe leave it on the shelf for a few months if you’re expecting...

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WHAT ’ S ON

Film Festival goes VIRTUAL CAMBRIDGE FILM FESTIVAL LAUNCHES A YEAR OF ONLINE FILM EVENTS

ast March, as the first lockdown was announced, the team behind Cambridge Film Festival (CFF) feared the 40th edition would

not go ahead. They acted fast to ensure the future of the festival was safe and immediately worked to save the event, so film lovers could continue to access films that weren’t available via other platforms. The team’s inaugural online event – the virtual film festival Amplify!, in partnership with FilmBath, Brighton Cinecity and Cornwall Film Festival – was a huge success, attracting an audience of more than 15,000 people who tuned in locally and nationally throughout November 2020. So, it’s no surprise that Cambridge Film Festival is now set to launch a series of year-round online films and film-related events this year. The Cambridge Film Festival at Home initiative kicks off on 8 January, with three outstanding films as part of the ‘A Film I Love…’ series. Special guests choose, present and talk about a film they love and why it means so much to them prior to a screening. Leading the line-up in January are three of the UK’s top film critics: Mark Kermode covers Andrew Kötting’s unexpectedly compelling The Whalebone Box , chair of the London Film Critics Circle and host of the Girls on Film podcast Anna Smith presents the hilarious Booksmart by Olivia Wilde, and radio presenter Simon Mayo professes his love for the three-hour epic, Amadeus (which coincidentally had its UK premiere at the Cambridge Film Festival back in 1984).

IMAGES The inaugural online film festival, Amplify!, brought together local and national film enthusiasts

films and film events to audiences in Cambridge and across the country, especially in these challenging times,” says Matthew Webb, executive director at Cambridge Film Trust. “We hope our wonderfully loyal Film Festival audience loves them and that they are a good build up to the 40th Cambridge Film Festival this year. It kicks off with the online events, featuring guests such as Mark Kermode and Simon Mayo, bringing hugely diverse screenings out of cinemas and into communities.” He concludes: “This means there’s sure to be something for everyone to enjoy.” Read full details of the online film events on the Cambridge Film Festival website. cambridgefilmfestival.org.uk

Alongside the ‘A Film I Love…’ series, CFF at Home includes two more key projects this year. Cambridge Film Festival In Your Community is a partnership with Cambridge City Council to present free film screenings in communities across north Cambridge, alongside a training scheme for young people to develop the skills to deliver film events in their own communities. CFF’s Youth Lab, an exciting film education initiative, is also expanding, encouraging young people to improve their film evaluation and criticism skills and providing unrivalled access to filmmakers and industry professionals through workshops and discussion groups. “We’re incredibly excited to have the opportunity to bring a series of fantastic

“Special guests choose, present and talk about a film they love and why it means so much to them”

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WHAT ’ S ON

IMAGES Clockwise from top; stills from Booksmart, Amadeus and The Whalebone Box, and film critics Anna Smith and Mark Kermode

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ONES TO WATCH IN 2021 • FOOD NEWS • RECI PES

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ONES TO WATCH

NEW FOR 2021

Ones to Watch THE EATERIES AND ENTERPRISES

ast year is going to be remembered as

one that brought the hospitality sector to its knees. Decimated revenues and huge job losses were the miserable shock waves of national lockdowns and restrictions, but in spite of the tough climate, Cambridge’s food and drink scene continued to expand and grow. New eateries – including Thrive and Giggling Squid – arrived and became instant hits, while much-loved Cambridge brands such as The Linton Kitchen and Jack’s Gelato cemented their success with second branches. The food delivery market got interesting, too, with Foodstuff launching as an independent- focused rival to Deliveroo, and Click It Local bringing the best of the indie high street direct to our doorsteps. Looking ahead to this year, things are about to get even more exciting, with some fantastic new food businesses heading our way. Say hello to the rising culinary stars of 2021…

WE PREDICT WILL BE STEPPING UP TO THE PLATE TO SHAPE CAMBRIDGE’S FOOD SCENE IN 2021

WORDS BY NICOLA FOLEY

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ONES TO WATCH

Trusted sauce

fter six successful years as co-owner of Steak & Honour, chef David Underwood has branched out on his own

to set up Orriss & Son, a new venture specialising in small-batch hot sauces. Promising to spice up your cooking with a fermented chilli kick, these versatile little wonders can be used for marinading, dropped into dressings and cocktails or even splashed on to salads and sandwiches, providing a flavour bomb that elevates even the simplest of dishes. All the sauces are vegan and gluten- free, with choices including Fresh Tendrils: a vibrant, fresh hit of acidity with jalapeños and nettles that’s perfect with slow-cooked or braised meat, and My Wave, which brings a peri-peri style tangy salinity. The one that started it all, Even Flow, was Orriss & Son’s original hot sauce recipe, based on fiery and fruity habaneros partnered with red and smoked chillies, tomato and apple juices. It’s the hottest of the range and, we’re reliably informed, seriously addictive. Looking ahead, there are new products in the offing, including rubs, seasonings and collaborations with other brands – not to mention an ambitious nationwide roll-out. “Orriss & Son’s versatility and depth of flavour means the sauces can be used in all kinds of ways; neat, layered, during cooking, as marinades and as ingredients for cocktails,” explains David. “This time next year, we’d love to see Orriss & Son sauces on dinner tables across the UK and also used in bars and professional kitchens.” Watch this space!

“Versatility and depth of flavour means the sauces can be used in

all kinds of ways”

IMAGES With three satisfyingly spicy sauces on offer, Orriss & Son’s condiments can be used as marinades, to enhance cooking and even in cocktails!

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ONES TO WATCH

“A world of exotic flavours awaits at Sole & Duck”

Fusion explosion

world of exotic flavours awaits at Sole & Duck, a new restaurant on Trumpington’s high street. Specialising

and Malaysia, amongst others, as well as incorporating a few favourite European dishes. Expect crispy aromatic duck with homemade hoisin sauce, luscious Sunday roasts and meltingly tender pork belly, all served in a charming, 17th-century building. The restaurant is due to open this month.

in British-Asian fusion dishes, the kitchen philosophy is about harnessing ingredients, flavours and techniques from the cuisines of Vietnam, Thailand

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ONES TO WATCH

Delivering the goods

rom small beginnings on a London rooftop in 2011, Burger & Lobster has evolved into a much-loved global brand, with restaurants

“Absolutely fresh and nothing frozen, and we use top-quality Nebraskan beef”

in New York, Dubai, Bangkok, Malaysia, Kuwait and Singapore, as well as multiple outposts in its home city. As the name suggests, the menu consists of variations on a lobster/burger theme, with favourites including the ‘original roll’: a brioche bun filled with juicy dressed lobster meat and smothered in Japanese mayo. As of last month, Cambridge dwellers can order these and other menu favourites to be delivered direct to their door, thanks to a collaboration with Deliveroo. “We have a good relationship with Deliveroo – they invited us to open our kitchen on their site in Cambridge and it’s going really well. Cambridge was in the top three of our list of locations, so we were really pleased to get an opportunity to open there,” explains marketing manager Ben Hedley. “Ultimately, we’d love to open a proper restaurant in Cambridge. We really see an opportunity there and we know the demographic is right. It’s certainly in the plan!”

It may be delivery only, but Burger & Lobster is bringing its fastidious commitment to quality to all of its takeaways in Cambridge, says Ben. “We only deal with live lobsters and they get delivered daily into our kitchens, absolutely fresh and nothing frozen, and we use top-quality Nebraskan beef. We’re offering exactly the same menus as you’d get at our restaurants, so we’ve got our core menu of burgers, lobsters and lobster rolls, but we’ve also got some more affordable items, like crispy prawn rolls, which have been popular – especially at lunchtime.” He adds: “We’ve worked really hard to make sure the packaging is perfect and we’ve done other things, such as create a playlist that people can listen to at home, so they can recreate the experience of dining at our restaurants.”

IMAGES Although it’s delivery only, Burger & Lobster’s menu is the same as you’d find in a restaurant, offering burgers, lobsters and lobster rolls aplenty

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ONES TO WATCH

Giving it some welly

ertain dishes have such a reputation for difficulty that most of us don’t even bother attempting them, and (along with souffles and

macarons), the beef wellington is right up there. A luxurious cut of meat in rich mushroom sauce and golden pastry, its preparation requires expensive ingredients and multiple techniques: the threat of a soggy bottom looming ominously throughout. A challenge for even the most avid cook, definitely, but when it’s done right, a real showstopper of a dish. If you can’t be bothered with the hassle and want a perfectly cooked wellington delivered directly to your doorstep, seek out the services of new Cambridge company Mucca, which launched during the spring lockdown. It’s the brainchild of William Hart, a chef who’s worked in some of the UK’s top Michelin-starred restaurants, and his friend Jon Millard, who comes from a confectionary background and brings experience on the management and logistics side of things. “It was while we were all isolating during the first lockdown that Mucca was created, when it would probably be fair to say most of the country felt a sense of uncertainty surrounding their jobs, and sadly many still do,” explains Jon. William’s planned restaurant was on hold and his wife was on furlough, while Jon had not long started his young family and his wife was out of work due to the pandemic. “William phoned me and just said ‘beef wellingtons’,” he laughs. “The irony was, despite being very niche, I had mentioned the same idea last winter to my wife, and I knew straight away what William was suggesting. It seemed like one of those ‘this is more than a coincidence’ moments.” Research began in earnest, with the

pair ordering every beef wellington that they could find and taste-testing them all, eventually settling on a recipe with a cut of extra mature Aberdeen Angus beef fillet and a mushroom duxelles flavoured with a 6-year-old Madeira and freshly picked thyme, encased in double lattice puff pastry. They seem to have nailed it, if the rush of orders and sell-outs so far is anything to go by. “We say that our products are from our chef to your table, and this is genuinely the case,” says Jon. “Our success has been down to the high number of reorders from customers and recommendations that they give. We’ve received orders from Olympic athletes, celebrity chefs, Formula One race car drivers, TV personalities and actors – but we don’t realise who has ordered until we see them mention us on social media reviewing our wellingtons!”

IMAGES Mucca’s beef wellingtons are available in a range of sizes, and are made using Aberdeen angus beef, mushroom duxelles, madeira and fresh thyme

“We say that our products are from our chef to your table, and this is genuinely the case”

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ONES TO WATCH

Biggerfish tofry

to indulge in soups, salads and sandwiches during the day and tasting menus in the evening. The deli side of the business will supply homemade foodie products, DIY recipes boxes, meal kits and other ‘fishy favourites’. Keep an eye on social media (@thefinboys) for updates.

he Fin Boys, aka Jay Scrimshaw and Richard Stokes, are on a mission to get us eating more fish and making more adventurous

choices when it comes to feasting on the fruit of the sea. Utilising their wealth of combined experience in the hospitality industry (Jay set up Guerrilla Kitchen and Richard was the long-term chef patron of Madingley’s Three Horseshoes), the pair are gearing up to open up a seafood bar, fish butchery and deli at number two Mill Road, offering huge variety of fish-based delicacies for eating in and taking away. At the butchery, you’ll be able to be able to pick up fabulously fresh, sustainably caught fish and get helpful advice on how to cook it, while at the seafood bar, you’ll be able

IMAGES The Fin Boys seafood bar, fish butchery and deli offers sustainably caught fish and seafood for eating in or takeaway

“Offering a huge variety of fish-based delicacies”

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ONES TO WATCH

Harvest time

arvest, a sleek new organic supermarket and coffee bar, has recently taken over the spot previously home to Mill Road’s

Kailash. It’s out with the cleaning products and home bargains and in with the organic fruit and veg, eco-friendly toiletries and vegan treats at this 2,000 sq ft unit, with the owners on a mission to provide shoppers with a different experience. “We’re bringing something unique to Cambridge,” enthuses director Tuncay products, and we’re trying to avoid selling anything that isn’t plant-based. We also serve locally roasted coffee, and we buy our goods from local farms and other local sources.” The shop is positively bursting with Cicek. “We provide lots of organic, vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free products to explore, from organic wine and beer to eco-friendly baby products – and once you’re done browsing, you can sit down and enjoy a pastry and a locally roasted coffee. “It’s been lovely so far, nice and busy – especially at the weekends,” Tuncay adds.

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ONES TO WATCH

“The plan is to have a proper restaurant, so this is a step towards that, giving us the training we need”

IMAGES La Latina offers mouth-watering tostones with guacamole, salsa and sour cream, as well as desserts like dulce de leche cake

On the buses

and chorizo, and banana bread with papaya and kiwi for something sweet”. Fans of La Latina’s strawberry lemonade will be pleased to hear that this will be making an appearance on the drinks menu, along with coconut and mint lemonades and tropical juices. The venue has an alcohol licence, too, so you can expect South American ales and beers, wine and tropical cocktails. The bus is currently resting, but Catalina and her husband are looking for a new location to serve food from, with hopes of continuing this side of the business alongside their Grafton cafe, which is open daily.

his business has built up a huge following over the last few years, doling out delicious Latin food from a double-decker bus at

to move into The Grafton “The plan is ultimately to have a proper restaurant, so this is a step towards that, giving us the training that we need. I am very impressed with The Grafton, it is very willing to support the independent businesses: Amélie is a family-run business, we are a family-run business and Chi is a small, independent business. I’m really happy about that and it’s really encouraging. “We have a bigger kitchen here so we can expand our menu,” she continues. “We’re going to introduce English and Latino breakfasts, which will include huevos rancheros, arepa with salchicha

Cambridge Retail Park, but it’s all change for 2021 with a new cafe at The Grafton. Sandwiched between Chi and Amélie, La Latina is the latest enterprise to join the shopping centre’s growing collection of independent eateries, and is serving up its famous tostones, arepas and empanadas, with some exciting additions on their way. “The kitchen was what we needed and the space was just right,” explains co-owner Catalina Uribe of the decision

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FOOD & DR INK

A taste of things to come CHEF’S TABLE

FROM MUM’S LASAGNE TO A SPONTANEOUS LUNCH WITH FRIENDS, ALEX RUSHMER SHARES THE EDIBLE EXPERIENCES HE’S MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO IN 2021

arrying reflection and nostalgia through the majority of last year proved to be a burdensome task. With so many avenues of joy

closed off to us for so long, I know I wasn’t alone in looking through the kaleidoscope of memories to glimpse more carefree moments. January, though, is the point at which we face towards the sunrise, not wistfully gaze back at the shrinking vista behind us. And so I’ve turned my thoughts to the flavours and experiences I’m looking forward to enjoying in 2021. These are by no means grand. If 2020 taught us anything, it is that happiness can be found in the smallest of pockets. Rather, they are hopeful vignettes of moments that are yet to occur, ones that I will try to nurture from seeds into fully formed reality as the weeks and months play out. Of course, if a trip to a garlanded restaurant in a faraway country is on the cards, it is not something I would turn down, but, for now, more modest aspirations dominate and I would settle for a drive up the M6 to see my parents. For dinner, I’ll request lasagne because, despite having made several thousand over the last few months, it has been years since I tasted one made by my mum, eaten with a cold salad, slick with sharp, garlicky dressing whisked up by dad and accompanied by a bucket-sized glass of thick rioja. Close behind that, there will be a trip to London to see my brother and his fiancee in a house they moved to during lockdown. He has assured me that he has been honing his barbecuing skills since ‘investing’ (his word) in a Big Green Egg and I cannot wait

to taste the dishes I’ve only been able to see photographs of until now. Professionally, too, there are moments I cannot wait for: eating brand-new varieties of produce from Flourish and testing new dishes with the team at Vanderlyle a few minutes before service starts. There is also the giddy experience of sampling hundreds of wines at a tasting event and the gradual fading of good intentions as the urge to fully indulge – rather than spit – takes hold. Come summer, there will be wedding food, too and I don’t care about its quality, merely its presence. As well as nuptials, the warmer months bring festivals and tents, and foggy heads have to be revived with crumpets toasted over a flame and mugs of sweet tea. There is part of me that is

even looking forward to plastic cups full of warming, watery beer as a precursor to those foggy heads. The flavour I look forward to most though is hard to define: what does spontaneity taste like? How does it feel in the mouth or work its way through the soul? Maybe it tastes like the first sip of a pint of Guinness, surrounded by friends at the end of the week, a unifying act that needs only the words ‘Does anyone fancy a…’ uttered with a cheeky smile. At other moments, it might be charred pitta bread, falafel and a shared tray of chips eaten after midnight, lit only by the bright glow of a kebab shop to quell the hunger pangs brought on by bellies full of booze. Or perhaps it has the flavour of an unexpected, extended lunch date with a friend that begins with fizz and ends with cocktails several hours later. Whatever format it takes, these little

“What does spontaneity taste like?”

splashes of colour are getting joyously larger as the memories of the last 12 months fade into the landscape.

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FOOD & DR INK

Recipe s THE WREN KITCHENS TEAM COOKS UP TWO SUGARY TREATS FOR SOME NEW YEAR INDULGENCE

PISTACHIO & ROSE BAKED DOUGHNUTS

SUGARY, SOFT AND SWEET, THESE DELIGHTFUL DOUGHNUTS ARE A SOPHISTICATED SPIN ON A CLASSIC

5

INGREDIENTS • 200g plain flour • 120g golden caster sugar • 1 tsp baking powder • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda • 1/4 tsp salt • 1 large egg • 140g Greek yoghurt • 4 tbsp coconut oil, melted • 100ml milk • 1 tsp rose water

ICING • 200g icing sugar, sifted to remove any lumps • 1 1/2 tsp rose water • A few drops of pink or red food colouring gel • 6-7 tbsp milk • 50g shelled pistachios, finely chopped • 4 tbsp edible dried rose petals

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6. Add the rest of the milk a little at a time, stirring after each addition, until you get a thick icing with a consistency that coats the back of the spoon. 7. Remove the doughnuts from the trays. Dip the smooth side into the icing and allow any excess to drip off. Place on a plate and sprinkle on the pistachios and rose petals before serving.

4. Spoon the mixture into a piping bag with no nozzle (or a disposable piping bag with the tip cut off to give a ¾ inch hole). Pipe the mixture into the doughnut rings. 5. Add the icing sugar to a large bowl along with the rose water and a few drops of pink or red food colouring gel. Add half of the milk and stir with a spoon.

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE 1. Preheat your oven to 170°C and grease two six-ring doughnut trays. 2. In a large bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt. 3. Add in the egg, Greek yoghurt, melted coconut oil, milk and rose essence. Stir together with a wooden spoon until just combined.

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FOOD & DR INK

CHOCOLATE MELTING MOMENTS WITH PEANUT BUTTER GANACHE

THESE SWEET AND SALTY BITES ARE A PERFECT MOUTHFUL AND DEVILISHLY MOREISH

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INGREDIENTS COOKIES • 250g butter, softened • 75g icing sugar

• 50g Dutch cocoa • 160g plain flour • 35g cornflour • 150g finely chopped unsalted peanuts PEANUT BUTTER GANACHE • 180g crunchy peanut butter • 120g white chocolate, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Preheat the oven to 160˚C and line two baking trays with baking paper. 2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, cream the butter and icing sugar until pale and fluffy. Sift the cocoa, flour and cornflour and fold into the creamed mixture until well combined. 3. Roll the mixture into balls approximately 3cm in diameter. Roll in chopped peanuts and place on to baking trays. Using a fork, gently flatten the biscuits. 4. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until cooked. Cool on the trays. 5. While the biscuits are baking, make the peanut butter ganache. 6. Combine the crunchy peanut butter and the chocolate in a small saucepan over a low heat until the chocolate melts and the peanut butter softens. Mix well and allow to cool to a spreadable consistency. 7. Fill the biscuits with the ganache.

A manufacturer and retailer of kitchens with branches across the UK, you can explore the Wren Kitchens range at the company’s Beehive Centre store. Kitchens are delivered fully built, with doors, drawers and wirework pre-installed, and the brand offers three key product ranges: Vogue, an affordable flat-pack collection; Infinity, available in five ranges, eight colours and comprising more than 100 types and sizes of unit; and Infinity Plus, with six ranges, more than 2,000 colours and a choice of nearly 2,000 different units. wrenkitchens.com ABOUT WREN KITCHENS

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DRY J ANUARY

PLANNING AN ALCO-HOLIDAY THIS MONTH? WITH SO MANY EXCELLENT BOOZE SUBSTITUTES ON THE MARKET, IT’S NEVER BEEN EASIER TO GO ALCOHOL FREE. NICOLA FOLEY ROUNDS UP SOME OF THE BEST BUYS

This one flat out blew me away. Delivering the delicious warming sensation of a stiff drink, it’s an aromatic, exotic- tasting elixir that perks you up with natural caffeine and pairs delightfully with tonic water and ice. Perfect for a party, it’s powered by guayusa, schisandra and energising plants and spliced with berries, bright aromatics and heat. These combine for a heady, completely unique drinking experience: fresh, fiery and bitter, with notes of ginger and berries, it induced a pleasant giddy feeling and definitely ‘livened’ me up, as promised. Also absolutely worth checking out are Three Spirit’s other AF tipples: Social Elixir (a dark and bittersweet number with a full-bodied flavour) and Nightcap – a decadent and dreamy serve designed to be enjoyed on the rocks. 1 LIVENER, BY THREE SPIRIT, 0% 10/10

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This sophisticated spirit from Seedlip offers up a heady bouquet of botanicals, with notes of lemon, grapefruit, cardamom and cloves. It smells divine, but the flavours didn’t come through quite as much as we’d have liked. That said, throw in a garnish and a quality tonic yourself and it’s a tasty grown-up tipple that beats a soft drink any day of the week. 3 SEEDLIP SPICE 94, 0%, £26.50 7.5/10

4 SPECIAL EFFECTS, BY BROOKLYN BREWERY 0.4% 8.5/10

5 UNFILTERED LAGER, BY LUCKY SAINT, 0.5% 8/10

As kings of the craft beer movement, you’d expect Brooklyn to turn out a decent non-alcoholic beer, and they absolutely have with Special Effects. It’s made using a special fermentation method that develops the flavours, aromas and character of beer, without the alcohol. It tastes brilliantly hoppy, with great depth of flavour, a crisp finish and a piney aroma.

Brewed in Bavaria, this lager has a rich flavour, with a malty, hoppy taste and pleasing bitterness for an enjoyable drinking experience. There’s no hangover and a night on the Lucky Saints won’t hurt your waistline either, with each 330ml bottle coming in at just 53 calories. Luckily, it’s also reliably easy to get hold of.

Aldi’s own-brand gin range, Haysmith’s, has proved a hit with gin lovers for its quality and affordability. But while the no-alcohol rhubarb and ginger offering is enjoyable, it lacks depth and is on the thin side compared to some other AF gins. That’s not to say it’s unpleasant; it’s light, fruity and gently spicy, with the rhubarb and juniper notes coming through, and would make a delicious, if not particularly boozy, G&T. 2 HAYSMITH’S NON-ALCOHOLIC RHUBARB & GINGER, 0% £9.99 7/10

6 CLWB TROPICA, BY TINY REBEL 0.5% 9/10

The first time I had this, I was halfway through before I realised I was drinking a non-alcoholic beer – which is testament to how close to the ‘real thing’ it tastes. A hazy, juicy IPA, this super summery tipple offers a burst of tropical fruits, tantalising your tastebuds with pineapple, mango and papaya, followed by a powerful hoppy hit. Anyone who thinks that AF beers are a weak and watery facsimile would do well to try this.

7 NOGRONI, 0%, £12 9/10

Given that a negroni is a pure-booze punch of gin, campari, and vermouth, attempting to recreate it with zero alcohol is a tall order – but Æcorn Aperitifs (sister brand of Seedlip), gives it a damn good go with its NOgroni. These pre-mixed mocktails come in a dinky bottle, containing enough for two serves – all you need to do is pour it over ice and garnish with an orange twist. Featuring Seedlip Spice 94, it’s got the signature syrupy bitterness of a negroni, with aromatic spices and zingy hints of citrus and grapefruit providing a rounded, complex flavour that impressively approximates the real deal.

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