Cambridge Edition October 2021 - Web

YOUR MONTHLY F IX OF

LOCAL L I FE

OCTOBER 2021

EMBRACE THE SEASON WITH OUR GUIDE TO THE BEST OF CAMBRIDGE THIS AUTUMN golden HOU

SIGN UP TO OUR DIGITAL ISSUE AT CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

WELCOME

Autumn days

Cambridge Edition Magazine Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area. EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Editorial assistant Frances McNaughton 01223 499469 francesmcnaughton@bright-publishing.com Editorial director Roger Payne Chief sub editor Alex Bell Sub editors MatthewWinney & Harriet Williams ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Hannah Gurney 01223 499463 hannahgurney@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Sam Adams, Mark Box, Charlotte Griffiths, Charlotte Phillips, Alex Rushmer, Anna Taylor & Elisha Young DESIGN & PRODUCTION Senior designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden &Matt Pluck

ur great expectations for the summer of 2021 may have been dashed by creeping Covid-19 cases and endlessly grey weather, but don’t fret – the arrival of autumn brings much to look forward to here in Cambridge. The joyful spectacle of the Half Marathon returns, bringing its throngs of sweaty, smiley runners (including me!), enthusiastic cheerers and general community spirit on 17 October, while the city’s cultural hotspots are gearing up for a packed few months of theatre and exhibitions. Sadly, one of our favourite events, the Mill Road Winter Fair, won’t go ahead as usual this year – but the good news is that the organisers are planning a series of scaled-down celebrations across October, November and December. Get the details on page 19. In this month’s Sip & Savour, man of the hour AdamWood – head chef at the much-hyped Garden House – shares some incredible recipes, while Vanderlyle drinks doyen Sam Adams gets creative with non-alcoholic tipples in honour of Sober October. If you want to hunker down with a good read this autumn, make your way to page 23, where Charlotte Griffiths has been thumbing her way through the latest literary releases to recommend the best new books. We’ve also got gigs, garden tips and much more besides – enjoy the issue and see you next month!

EDITOR IN CHIEF

F IND US @CAMBSEDITION | CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

Contents

39

04 Starters This month’s wish list from local indies, plus our top social media pics of the month 09 Culture Club Art exhibitions, great reads, new venues, the best upcoming theatre – and much more 27 Keep on Running As the Cambridge Half Marathon returns, we delve deeper into this much-loved event 28 Humans of Cambridge This month’s street style portraits from local photographer Mark Box 30Memories on the Map We meet the neighbourhood historians curating a chronicle of Histon Road 33 Halloween From cabaret to woodland walks, there’s something for everyone this spooky season

35 Tried &Tested Frances McNaughton visits Peacock Archery to have a go at William Tell’s favourite pastime 39 Savour & Sip Recipes from Garden House, Sober October tipples and foodie insights 66 Beauty Winter is coming – protect yourself from dry, Open-day season is upon us: here’s how to maximise your visits and make the right choice 84 Let’s Go To... Ely With history, heritage and tasty eats, our neighbouring city makes for a perfect day trip 87 Home Edition Interiors trends, gardening tips and the latest from new town Northstowe weathered skin with these great buys 71 Education Edition

Cover illustration by Lucy Woolcomb, senior designer at Bright Publishing.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 03

LOCAL L I FE Starters

@TOMJUGGINS_UK

@WAKINGUPHERE

@CAMDIARY

#instacamb OUR FAVOURITE CAMBRIDGE INSTAGRAM PICS OF THE MONTH!

DON'T MISS! Winter Lights

One of the most popular seasonal events in Cambridgeshire, Winter Lights at Anglesey Abbey returns in December – and now is the time to book your tickets. With atmospheric lighting, sound and performance, a magical scene is set in the gardens, bringing the Nature by Night theme to life. Expect collaborative creativity and a sensory treat that ’ s perfect for those who love spending time in nature. “The event always sells out fast, and it’s brilliant to see how loyal our community has stayed, despite a year without it taking place. We see many faces that return and are so proud that it creates a real moment in their calendar of memories,” says Janet Jephcott, experience and visitor programming manager at Anglesey Abbey. “We’re extremely proud of the reputation our event has for being accessible to those with additional needs, and we continue to work closely with local children’s charity Spectrum to develop our plans and provide free access to our launch night.” Follow Anglesey Abbey’s social media channels for more details in the coming weeks – and you can book your tickets at the website. nationaltrust.org.uk/AAWinterLights

04 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

2

LOCAL L I FE

1

3

4

October

5

6

THIS MONTH’S MUST-HAVES FROM LOCAL INDIES

8 9

7

1. Yaslevel cardigan, £55, Iris & Violet We think we’ve found the perfect autumn cardigan! Comfortable and classic, it will take you from lazing on the sofa to chilly walks and pub lunches 2. Flower sprays tin plate, £7, Curating Cambridge A pretty plate influenced by Iznik ceramics from Curating Cambridge, which showcases unique gifts inspired by the collections of the University of Cambridge 3. Palatin busts, £16.50, Ark Grecian-style busts are officially hot news – grab one from local gift store Ark, as the perfect gift for the classicist or Greek mythology fan in your life 4. Bee tea towel, set of two, £8.95, Angela Reed With a cute bee motif and gorgeous ochre colour, these twin tea towels would look right at home in a rustic country kitchen 5. Elizabeth Scarlett sunflowers makeup bag, £24, Lilac Rose Featuring delicate, embroidered sunflowers on a luxurious velvet fabric (with water-resistant lining), this gorgeous makeup bag is guaranteed to bring some sunshine to your day 6. Shiny nickel steel and glass lantern, £109, Angela Reed A distressed gold lantern will add a touch of Moroccan glamour to your home, casting beautiful shadows thanks to its cutwork-pattern detailing 7. Shell cushion, £15, Ark Designed to snuggle into the small of your back and offer support, this comfy cushion is both stylish and functional 8. Ebony vase, £33.50, Modaire Living via Click It Local This classy monochrome vase from local company Modaire Living will frame a wild bouquet beautifully 9. Brewboard Jinjamon, £28.50 (case of 12x330ml cans) A recent release from Harston’s BrewBoard microbrewery, this distinctive red IPA is infused with ginger and Sicilian lemons

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 05

Culture Club

SEASON SHAKE-UP

EXPECT ECLECTIC EXHIBITIONS, VIBRANT LOCAL LIFE AND SPARKLING THEATRE – THIS MONTH, IT’S SHOWTIME IN THE CITY in full swing

AERIAL ACTION Neon Moon returns with some risqué fun for Halloween

© CHRIS CLAYTON

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 09

CULTURE CLUB Arts & Culture THE MUST-SEE EVENTS AROUND CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH

7 Oct

ACTION STATIONS

Theatre spotlights IT’S ALL SYSTEMS GO AT THE CITY’S BIGGEST VENUES THIS SEASON, WITH A SELECTION OF FANTASTIC HIGHLIGHTS TO LOOK OUT FOR

Over at the ADC Theatre, the latter half of the month has a few smash-hit shows to keep you entertained. The first of these asks an age-old question: can successful women truly be allowed to ‘have it all’? Caryl Churchill’s play Top Girls sees protagonist Marlene receive a promotion at her job agency, and to celebrate, she hosts a dinner party for her most interesting female friends. There’s nothing strange to note... until you realise her guests include a 13th-century Buddhist monk, a pope, and a figure from Flemish folklore. Catch it from 19 to 23 October. Then, from 26 to 30 October, two shows run in tandem at the ADC Theatre and Corpus Playroom. Pass Over sees this script in its debut amateur production, following critically acclaimed, professional performances on Broadway and in London. The emotional, lyrical story exposes the unquestionable human spirit of two young men stuck in a cycle they’re desperate to escape. Or, if that doesn’t pique your interest, catch Ghost Quartet at the Corpus Playroom. Accompanying a story that spans seven centuries and four generations, this intoxicating song-cycle features live music alongside strange tales of love, revenge and spirits – alcoholic or otherwise.

It may be a little soon to get into the festive spirit, but it’s never too early to secure your seats at the panto – and Cambridge Arts Theatre has recently announced this year’s production will come in the shape of Aladdin . Hoping to live up to pre-pandemic expectations with a show that’s bigger and better than ever, this spectacular production will be granting all your wishes from 2 December through to 9 January 2022. A little earlier on, enjoy a theatrical reimagining of The Good Life , starring seasoned comedian Rufus Hound, alongside Bend It Like Beckham and EastEnders actress Preeya Kalidas. Jeremy Sams directs this stage-set version of the much-loved sitcom, leading the characters through hilarious adventures. Don’t miss it – the curtain goes up from 9 to 13 November. Later on in November, spectacular puppetry show Dragons and Mythical Beasts provides a spellbinding, family-friendly escape. It’s a magical world of myths and legends, filled with dark secrets to unveil, magnificent monsters to marvel at, creatures to terrify and comical characters to keep you laughing. It will be running from 18 to 20 November.

The month of October is filled with eclectic fun over at the Junction. Multi-talented performer Symoné presents her surrealistic pop-culture experience Utopian on 7 October. Joined by her two accomplices, the adventure is packed with pole dancing, high-heel roller skating and dazzling aerial performances. The Thinking Drinkers promise to be another must-see, and will be appearing on 23 October. They’ll bring the ultimate pub quiz to town – and with five free beverages, to boot! Simply strap yourself in for an evening of alcohol-fuelled hilarity, and let the pair of award-winning experts lead the way. Following that, the Junction’s upcoming Palaver Festival – on 28 October – is a day-long celebration of inclusive performance. The venue will transform into a hub of family fun, with discos, workshops and DIY costume-making all on offer, alongside fabulous storytelling, music and performance spaces. This year’s festival will be hosted by RuPaul’s Drag Race UK legend Ginny Lemon, with events and activities spread across the day from 10am until 5pm. Keep an eye on the Junction’s website and social media channels for full programme details.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 11

CULTURE CLUB

Top culture pick SUTAPA BISWAS: LUMEN IN HER LATEST EXHIBITION, LUMEN, BRITISH INDIAN ARTIST SUTAPA BISWAS EMPLOYS A FEMINIST, DECOLONIAL LENS TO DISRUPT TEMPORAL LIMITATIONS. WE TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT THE WORKS – AND THE WOMAN – IN QUESTION

TIME AND SPACE Catch the first substantial display of Biswas’ solo works for 14 years at Kettle’s Yard, fromOctober into the new year

puzzle that the mesmerising art invites you to complete for yourself. Nonetheless, Lumen doesn’t exactly let you off the hook. It draws you in, and the opportunity to immerse yourself is there if you wish to take it – but the narrative is in no way linear or straightforward. Much of the subject matter is challenging, tough, powerful and personal – strong feelings are evident, at times explicit. For the most part, the complexity allows for a gentler assimilation of political statements. The exhibition’s multi-layered nature can be interpreted as many voices, coming from different places. In essence, it’s challenging skewed perceptions of the present, from an angle both imaginative and liberating. “I am fascinated by the mind of my son when he was a child, when he saw no division between the real and the imagined space in terms of what’s possible,” Biswas continues, in her interview with Jhala. “That sense of wonder is ultimately for you to reconsider the past, so that you can imagine a different future.” Lumen will be showing at Kettle’s Yard from 16 October until 30 January 2022. For more information and to book tickets, visit the Kettle’s Yard website. kettlesyard.co.uk

“I’m trying to saturate spaces with the possibility of imagination,” says British Indian artist Sutapa Biswas to Kabir Jhala, in an interview for The Art Newspaper in June of this year. And this, it seems, she is doing with aplomb. After more than three decades spent blending poetry and provocation across mediums like photography, painting and performance – all the while challenging discrimination in the arts and beyond – Biswas is reinstating her position as a prominent force of representation. This comes in the shape of Lumen , an overwhelmingly rich and involving exhibition that calls for the UK to confront its imperial legacy, with a focus on far-reaching, frequently dismissed repercussions still felt today. As the artist’s first solo exhibition in 14 years, Lumen stands as a collective transmutation of the subject matter prevalent throughout her defiant career. It’s an amalgamation of references and ideas that’s somehow still open in its approach, willing the viewer to participate in the process – and the making of meaning. It is split across two key UK venues: the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead is currently playing host to a huge screen displaying Biswas’ Lumen film; and here in Cambridge, Kettle’s Yard will become home to a selection of the artist’s visually compelling works, providing pieces of a

STRONG FEELINGS ARE EVIDENT, AT TIMES EXPLICIT

12 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CULTURE CLUB

IT’S LIT Page turners

Cambridge Literary Festival is in full swing, and there are a few highlights not to miss this month. Introducing her brand-new series of novels, Val McDermid will be appearing at the University Arms on 1 October. The highly acclaimed author invites you to immerse yourself in her latest protagonist’s crime-steeped world, and strap yourself in for the first instalment of a series set to document critical moments from the past four decades. On 5 October, Bernardine Evaristo will grace West Road Concert Hall for an exclusive event presenting her intimate memoir Manifesto on Never Giving Up . Mapping her creative rebellion, Manifesto delves into the author’s commitment to ‘untold’ stories, following her move from the margins – slowly, but surely – into the spotlight. There’s also talks from Amartya Sen, Claire Keegan and Amor Towles to look forward to this October – head to the Cambridge Literary Festival website for more information. cambridgeliteraryfestival.com

BESTSELLER Claire Keegan will appear at Pembroke College in conversation with Gillian Beer on 22 October, discussing her novella Small Things Like These

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 13

CULTURE CLUB

LAZULI: THE FANTASTIC TOUR 28 FEBRUARY 2022, 7.30PM, THE PORTLAND ARMS, £15 ADV

AFTER HOURS Out on theTown THIS LOCAL PUB AND THEATRE PROMISES A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

International progressive rock oddity Lazuli bring their sensational sound to Cambridge. It’s a musical melting pot with a side of French flair.

stage, Seska. His latest foray into nigh-on nonsense, Bullinachinashop , is fun-filled entertainment for all the family. But be quick – his last show sold out at Cambridge Comedy Festival. In case you thought the laughs were letting up, New York cabaret star Tori Scott hits the venue on 28 October, with her latest show Welcome to the After Party . Primarily a celebration of poor life choices, and an unadulterated love of vodka, the show is interspersed with Tori’s powerhouse vocals – just to keep you on your toes. To those looking for a wild night out in Cambridge: you may have just found it here! For full event information and to book tickets, head to townandgown.co.uk

Tucked away on Market Passage, the Town and Gown is a relatively new addition to the city’s arts and culture scene. The theatre part of the building pays homage to the site’s 1930s Arts Cinema identity, with an intimate, fringe-style venue in the form of the Black Box Theatre on the top floor. You can also pop into the pub portion of the rejuvenated space and pick yourself up a locally brewed beer, or enjoy an atmospheric meal with live piano playing in the background. If you’re thinking of heading along this month, there’s a series of eclectic variety performances lined up. Reading this at the end of the month? Then you might just make Paper Boats , a part-verbatim show that offers a frank look at the reality of leaving prison in the UK – this runs from 27 to 29 September. Into October, catch the spectacularly irreverent Jesus L’Oreal: Nailed It! on 1 and 2 October, offering song, dance and a curiously- named instalment of ‘Jehovah’s Fitness’. Meanwhile, 7 October sees Cambridge Gin Laboratory team up with the venue to offer a gin-tasting experience like no other. It’s an evening of distillation meets drama, molecular mixology meets musicals… and, most importantly, a chance to sample some of the city’s finest gin. On 9 October, the Town and Gown’s regular open- mic musical theatre night is on the cards, hosted by Stage Door Johnny, and accompanied by musical director Ian Stephenson. It’s a completely free event to take part in – or just watch – but is so much fun, you’ll wish you’d paid for it! Then, from 13 to 17 October, Adam Gwon’s Ordinary Days tells the musical tale of four seemingly regular people trundling through their mundane days, in a production that has toured the world – yet still manages to touch audiences, thanks to its witty and emotive storytelling. Boris the Musical 3: The Johnson Supremacy follows from 20 to 23 October for a dose of contrast, offering a satirical take on our country’s current political shenanigans – and a decidedly scathing depiction of the man at the helm. Next up on 24 October is a turbo-charged comedy magic show from star of the

CELESTE 12 APRIL 2022, 7PM, CORN EXCHANGE, £28.50 Rising star Celeste has lit up the UK’s music scene for the past two years, and looks set to follow suit in 2022. This is your chance to hear her debut album, Not Your Muse , live.

THE DIVINE COMEDY 5 MAY 2022, 7PM, CORN EXCHANGE, £31 Catch the best bops from the Northern Irish pop band in this show, a collection of their finest moments, led by frontman Neil Hannon.

HIDDEN GEM With a unique blend of gastronomy and fringe theatre, the Town and Gown is an intimate venue like no other – pop to the pub for a pie, then catch a cabaret show

14 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CULTURE CLUB

Local heritage Sex and the City

FORGOTTEN FIGURES ARE STARKLY REMEMBERED IN THESE EYE-OPENING TOURS FROM CAMBRIDGE GREEN BADGE GUIDES

for prostitution just for walking in the street. No evidence was needed to warrant a thorough inspection, which often included an invasive medical exam, followed by detainment in the Spinning House – otherwise known as the House of Correction. A high-profile case involving Daisy Hopkins – a 17-year-old girl who boldly sued the university, after being held for ten days on suspicion of having a corrupting influence on a male student – led to a public debate regarding the legitimacy of these arrests. Daisy’s moral character was viciously dissected in court, and she lost her case, but the ensuing discussion eventually culminated in a change in the law, deeming it illegal for the university to arrest solely on suspicion and without evidence. These are just a couple of examples of the stories you can expect to hear on the tours run by Cambridge Green Badge Guides – an enthusiastic, learning-driven team always looking to add to their richly detailed narrative of the city. Green Badge Guide Sophie Smiley is particularly passionate about bringing important stories of local women to light. “We’re always looking to incorporate new tales into our tours,” she explains. “We love discovery, and telling these forgotten stories so people can learn something about Cambridge they perhaps didn’t know about before.” Sex and the City: Cambridge Women, Town and Gown tours run twice weekly, and commence at The Round Church on Bridge Street. Catch them every Thursday from 6-7.30pm, and Sunday from 2.30-4pm. Get in touch with the team via email if you’d like to arrange a private tour. cambridge.women.tours@gmail.com

Offering an often-overlooked view of the city’s illustrious history, Sex and the City: Cambridge Women, Town and Gown is a guided tour of Cambridge like no other. It explores the evocative, occasionally astounding sense of invisibility tied to the women of Cambridge – many of whom have shaped the city as we know it today, whether socially, politically or even architecturally. Simultaneously a celebration of these influential females, and a means of recognition for the lesser-known characters who played their part in creating a more progressive political landscape, the tours enable participants to uncover fascinating local stories. Many have been systematically excluded from the city’s historical and cultural conversation, despite their undeniable influence on the present, and several were significant figures in educational reform. Take Philippa Fawcett, who scored the top mark in the University of Cambridge’s 1890 Mathematical Tripos entrance exam by 13%, yet was not afforded the chance to obtain a degree. She was not the only one, and in fact Trinity College Dublin capitalised on this injustice, inviting the snubbed women to gain degrees there instead, providing them with the freedom to be independent – and go on to teach. Some of the stories are more shocking than others. The tours don’t shy away from the more salacious tales that underpin the city’s recent history, citing the university’s historic partnership with Cambridge police, and its devastating impact on young women during Victorian times. In an era when being young and female supposedly meant you must be dangerous to young men – on account of potentially leading them astray – it was commonplace for women to be arrested

8 Oct

16 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CULTURE CLUB

30 Oct

GREAT GIGS

HOTTEST TICKETS CAMBRIDGE WELCOMES BACK LIVE MUSIC WITH OPEN ARMS THIS OCTOBER If this month’s gig calendar is anything to go by, the next few weeks are set to be a non-stop party, with immense musical highlights coming at you from both the Corn Exchange and the Junction. Laura Marling graces the former’s stage on 5 October, for one of her first headline dates in over five years. She’s taking her acclaimed, lockdown-born album Song for Our Daughter out for its inaugural spin – and considering its Grammy Award and Mercury Prize nominations, the live experience is set to be one to remember. That’s only the beginning of the action at the Corn Exchange this month, as Rufus Wainwright will prove on 15 October. The eminent musician takes to the stage with a set list of veritable classics and brand-new material, ahead of the release of his highly anticipated album Unfollow the Rules . It will demonstrate his timeless, engaging stage presence – and hard-won artistic maturity. This month at the Corn Exchange closes with a performance from Biffy Clyro on 30 October. Originally pencilled in for April this year, fans will be eager to catch the trio for their long-awaited return, as part of – appropriately – The Fingers Crossed Tour . Over at the Junction, you won’t know where to look first, with an events calendar that’s fit to burst. There’s a trio of highlights you’ll not want to miss, though. First up, The Psychedelic Furs land at the venue on 5 October. It may be a Tuesday, but make no mistake, the English post-punk band will be bringing the noise, led by the indelible Butler brothers’ commitment to brazen, infectious sound and seasoned showmanship. Then, on 8 October, you’ve got Turin Brakes. Celebrating two decades since their definitive debut, The Optimist LP , the south London outfit are back to bring the energy that catapulted them to commercial success for a time-travelling, milestone live set. And finally, on 21 October, Lonely The Brave will take to the stage. The Cambridge rockers have been making a name for themselves for several years now, and third studio album The Hope List demonstrates their ever-evolving scope, projecting quintessential alternative rock onto a stadium-sized screen. Tickets for all of the events mentioned can be found on the Corn Exchange and Cambridge Junction websites. cambridgelive.org.uk junction.co.uk

21 Oct

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 17

CULTURE CLUB

COMMUNITY SPIRIT Streets ahead In lieu of this year’s usual Winter Fair, organisers have managed to put together a carefully tailored event to avoid crowding, while still providing a celebration for the vibrant Mill Road community. Mill Road Saturdays will feature craft and charity stalls, buskers (and bunting!), plus a series of Covid- safe events to be held on Donkey Common and Petersfield Green. Unlike previous years, Mill Road will not be closed to traffic during the celebrations, and much of the action will take place in the area’s green spaces. Keep an eye out for the bunting in Petersfield, as a closer look reveals a very special I Spy Mill Road trail, encouraging visitors to explore the street for themselves, discovering its cherished indie shops, cafes, pubs and restaurants. Catch the Mill Road Saturdays events on 9 October, 6 November and 4 December. Find out more at millroadwinterfair.org

© ADAM CASH

Visual Feasts THREE OF THIS MONTH’S MOST EXCITING EXHIBITIONS

COLOURFUL CHAOS My Artwork Is Terrible and I am A Very Bad Person may seem like a bizarre title for an exhibition, but when it comes to providing comic relief after the most surreal year in living memory, artist David Shrigley surely delivers. This brand- new display of satirical, occasionally crude ink drawings is characteristically chaotic – and always light-hearted. Head to Extraordinary Objects on Green Street to see it for yourself.

DARK SHADOWS Castle Fine Art recently unveiled an exclusive collection of graffitied art by Richard Hambleton. Titled Shadowman , it features several of the artist’s menacing, dark silhouettes, which revolutionised street art when first appearing in the alleyways and subways of New York in the 80s. It has been curated using original artworks from the Richard Hambleton Archive, with four limited-edition graphics of the famous figures.

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD Until 10 October, cast your eyes upon a selection of contemporary ceramics and glass on display at The Heong Gallery. Of the Earth showcases some of the most intriguing works being produced in Britain today, giving a nod to the beauty and utility of these objects – and commemorating their continued resonance. The Heong Gallery is celebrating its fifth birthday this year, so now is the perfect time to pay a visit.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 19

CULTURE CLUB

TAKING SHAPE

FORMATIVE YEARS A NEW DISPLAY AT THE FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM EXPLORES THE INFLUENCE OF MEMORY ON THE UNMISTAKABLE WORK OF CERAMIC ARTIST MAGDALENE ODUNDO

It’s half a century since Magdalene Odundo DBE moved to East Anglia to take an Art Foundation course at Cambridge School of Art. There, the artist would soon happen upon her love of ceramics, thanks to time spent studying with Zimbabwean-born pottery teacher Zoë Ellison. It was Ellison who encouraged Odundo to begin making, introducing her to contemporary British studio potters and catalysing her decision to embark on a career in ceramics. During her time in Cambridge 50 years ago, Odundo visited the FitzwilliamMuseum, along with the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, many times. She marvelled at the array of ceramics on display, often hailing from the farthest reaches of the globe, and soon became captivated by clay’s versatility as a medium. The young student immersed herself in the city’s rich and varied museum collections, drawing from them the foundations which would help build her career. Odundo began crafting her own ceramic works, developing an incredibly distinctive style that has since gained her an enviable reputation in the art world. She spent time training with women potters in Nigeria and Kenya, picking up

skills that provided further nuance. Her works – usually striking, large vessels – favour form over function, appearing most frequently in shades of black and terracotta. Often, the artist will spend days, or even weeks, on a single piece, employing laborious burnishing techniques to achieve an impressive natural sheen. To celebrate, and in some ways commemorate, Odundo’s time in Cambridge 50 years ago, the artist has collaborated with the Fitzwilliam to curate a visual exploration of her

Odundo by Ellison back in her Cambridge School of Art days. Helen Ritchie, in-house curator of the exhibition, was heavily involved in sourcing the items on display, many of which were drawn frommemory alone.

formative memories. The resulting exhibition could be deemed part-collection, part-recollection. It’s made up of pieces ranging from works by Odundo herself, to archival examples of ceramics

“Sometimes it would take a lot of trawling through images to find what we were looking for, and other times it would be very straightforward,” explains Helen. “There was a particular flat dish from the late 1600s that Magdalene

YOU GET A SENSE OF HER VOICE

that appeared in the city’s museums while Odundo was still a student. The exhibition also comprises rare pieces by Ellison – as the Fitzwilliam is one of the few museums in the United Kingdom to house her work – along with several examples that were initially introduced to

remembered clearly; it had stayed with her, and contributed to her thinking much later down the line. We made so many memory connections to objects fromMagdalene’s time in Cambridge – a kind of subconscious unearthing.” Although responsible for much of the internal legwork, the curator credits Odundo for imbuing the display with its unique character. “You get a strong sense of Magdalene’s voice in the exhibition,” Helen comments. “All of the labels, the ceramic pieces – they were chosen by Magdalene herself.” This thought process has also influenced the physical presentation. Situated in one of the Fitzwilliam’s light-flooded, ground-floor galleries, the ceramics are displayed in spaced-out cases, allowing for a full 3D experience. There are four pieces of Odundo’s work interspersed throughout the exhibition, including one at each of the gallery’s two entrances, acting simultaneously as a bookend to the display’s multi-referential narrative – and as an anchored starting point for visitors entering from either side. The works first situate you in the space, and from there allow you to explore the scope of the exhibition in its entirety. Odundo has always advocated for the importance of visual literacy, and this carefully curated display encourages the viewer to look closely, take in the form and shape of the works, and consider the intricate links between them. Magdalene Odundo in Cambridge opens on 5 October at the FitzwilliamMuseum. To find out more, and to explore the accompanying audio resources, visit the website. fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

DOWNMEMORY LANE With remarkable life experience and a wealth of global ceramic knowledge, Magdalene Odundo’s works are now here to be enjoyed, at the FitzwilliamMuseum

20 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

ARTS & CULTURE

Book Club CAMBRIDGE EDITION FROM COMING-OF-AGE ADVENTURES TO SHADY BUSINESS DEALINGS, THERE’S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE IN THIS COLLECTION OF MUST-READS

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

The First Woman BY JENNIFER NANSUBUGA MAKUMBI

First published in 2020, but now rising in the charts through word-of-mouth recommendations, this sweeping coming- of-age story grips tightly from the start and will not let you go. We meet 12-year-old storyteller Kirabo in 1975, as she – like most almost-teenagers – is slowly becoming consumed with questions about the world around her. She’s surrounded by strong women and a close-knit family unit, headed by her beloved grandparents; but where is her real mother? What comes next for her growing up in Uganda, where many parties have strong opinions about how girls live their lives? And perhaps most confusingly, why does it sometimes feel like she slips from her body to soar above the room? She bravely decides to seek answers from Nsuuta, the blind ‘witch’ that lives in her village, who reveals that Kirabo’s second flying self is the manifestation of ‘woman’s original state’ – which was bred out over generations of self-contained wives and daughters. “We were not squeezed inside, we were huge, strong, bold, loud, proud, brave, independent. But it was too much for the world and they got rid of it,” explains Nsuuta. “However, occasionally that state is reborn in a girl like you… the first woman flies out of your body because it does not relate to the way this society is.” The novel slips effortlessly between the magical and the everyday, and sees characters wrestle with the conventions that determine so much of women’s lives in Uganda (and everywhere). We follow Kirabo’s quest for her mother to the big city, and life in her father’s compound with his second wife, then on to boarding

school, as her abilities open doors hitherto closed. She confides in Sio, her childhood friend who becomes a lover, testing his professed mwenkanonkano, or feminist beliefs – and gently pushes the boundaries of her cage by making choices wherever she can. Though her childhood flights are a distant memory, the presence of the ‘original state’ in Kirabo signals hope of change, for a future when women might finally understand kweluma – or why penned hens peck each other. As Nsuuta explains: “That is when oppressed people turn on each other or on themselves and bite. It is as a form of relief. If you cannot bite your oppressor, you bite yourself.” An exquisitely captivating, beautifully textural and unforgettable tale of feminist awakening, youthful rebellion and how to test the boundaries of your self-imposed cage: place The First Woman on the top of your own to-read pile, then buy copies for all your friends to help more women realise that pecking each other – though it might feel better short term – isn’t going to solve anything in the long run.

POPULAR OPINION With gorgeous prose, a mesmerising storyline and rave reviews, The First Woman – Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi’s third published work – was longlisted for the Diverse Book Awards 2021

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 23

ARTS & CULTURE

THE CULT OFWE BY ELIOT BROWN & MAUREEN FARRELL

thrilling businesses of recent times wasn’t actually a shimmeringly successful tech giant. It was nothing more than a glorified estate agent. And if those numbers aren’t already making your toes curl, the rest of the stories will. This book is the result of years of dedicated reporting for The Wall Street Journal , with journalists Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell interviewing hundreds of WeWork employees and stakeholders to discover the answer to one very simple question: how could this happen? While WeWork’s financial downfall was very public, the hidden deals and investments which lay behind the headlines will make your eyebrows shoot up to the stratosphere. Employees were left jobless, investors were left with empty pockets, but the CEO? He left rich… Though no longer headed by the Neumanns, WeWork remains in business (though still experiencing eye-watering losses) and, if nothing else, reading The Cult Of We will be excellent homework for the two upcoming dramatisations of the Neumann tale. One is based on this book,

If you’ve ever stopped outside the shiny new office blocks on Station Road and wondered what WeWork does, this new book is an absolute must-read. A quick answer to the question is ‘spending other people’s money’ – but like all grifts, that’s just the half of it. In 2010, WeWork’s founder Adam Neumann was struggling to sell baby clothes. Less than a decade later, he was CEO of a $47-billion company – one of the highest-valued private businesses on the planet – which provided stylish office space and associated perks to thousands of smaller companies in big cities around the world. Yet behind the parties, the free drinks and chic interiors, on paper, WeWork was an accountant’s nightmare. The business was losing more than $3,000 every minute , which added up to $1.6 billion in 2018 alone. When the company imploded in September 2019, $40 billion of value evaporated almost overnight – resulting in the departure of Neumann and his wife Rebekah (chief brand and impact officer). Everyone finally realised that one of the most valuable, charismatic and

with Nicholas Braun ( Succession ’ s Cousin Greg) as Adam, and the other, Apple’s WeCrashed, stars Anne Hathaway and Jared Leto. Make a bowl of popcorn to stuff in your slack-jawed mouth, and strap in for this car-crash of a ride through what is – as the authors say in their introduction – a truly vital parable for modern business.

BOOM AND BUST Cult of We captures the zeitgeist of modern start-up culture, exploring the greed, charisma and madness of the WeWork saga – and what it means for business

24 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

ARTS & CULTURE

Events for bookworms Waterstones’ autumn season of author events continues with a visit from acclaimed essayist and Oxford don, Merve Emre. Join her on 15 October for a discussion on The Annotated Mrs. Dalloway , which gives an illuminating commentary on Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece. In conversation with Clare College fellow and director of Literature Cambridge Trudi Tate, this event will offer an engaging examination of Woolf’s artistry and originality. Tickets from £3, or £30 with a copy of the book. On Thursday 28 October, the spotlight is on Talya Miron- Shatz, founding director of the Center for Medical Decision Making and visiting researcher at the University of Cambridge. With humour and vast knowledge, her book Your Life Depends On It looks at the preventable ways we make bad choices about everything from nutrition to medication. Tickets from £3, or £22 with a copy of the book.

The Book of Form & Emptiness BY RUTH OZEKI

A heart-warming tale within a story of struggle within a book which makes you reassess the function of literature, this affecting story is a perfect autumnal read for all ages. After the unexpected death of his jazz-musician father, grief-stricken Benny Oh is surprised when objects around him start sharing their thoughts and observations. He is slowly overwhelmed by the voices and their constant chatter, eventually skiving school to seek solace in the tranquillity of the local library, where the polite books know how to behave. The novel takes the form of a back-and-forth conversation between Benny and ‘The Book’, where each share their take on events – this creates a structure that can be dizzying, but maintains a constant forward motion toward resolution. Many sections reminded me of the philosophical conversations in Sophie’s World , the 1991 novel where young Sophie explores belief systems. Benny’s similar quest for meaning sees him encounter numerous unforgettable characters, including a homeless poet-philosopher and an enigmatic artist, who uses the library’s books as a canvas and carries a ferret in their pocket. At home, his mother battles her own grief, physically manifested as clutter from her information-recording job – while a small book on tidying tries valiantly to help her see the solution to her deep sadness. If you’re feeling bogged down by clutter – emotional or physical – or struggling with life’s challenges, this book will leave you holding your loved ones tightly, eyeing the objects around you with intrigue, and perhaps even lead you to the library to reconnect with reading.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 25

RUN FOR I T

CAMBRIDGE HALF MARATHON Going the Distance

GEAR UP FOR ONE OF THE BIGGEST SPORTING EVENTS IN THE CALENDAR

n Sunday 17 October, the Cambridge Half Marathon takes to the starting line once again. Covering many of Cambridge’s

most famous landmarks, as well as stretches of gorgeous countryside and green spaces around the city, the super flat course is known for being one of the top in the country for nabbing a personal best – and this year, it’s even more optimised. The new route cuts out a few bends, speeding it up for runners slightly and additionally making the most of the scenic views that make the Cambridge Half Marathon unique. Of course, there have been additional changes with regards to safety, too, but nothing to detract from the overall enjoyment of the event. Adam Moffat, director of the event, explains: “The most significant changes will be the Covid-19 restrictions we have implemented. We want everyone to feel safe when they come and take part in the Cambridge Half Marathon.” The organisers have worked hard to ensure the race is safe for participants and spectators – and are delighted to be at full capacity once again.

IN THE RACE The gorgeous route takes you through the grounds of King’s College, among other famous sights

Just like us here at Edition , the Cambridge Half Marathon is celebrating its tenth birthday in 2021. Back in 2012, the race managed to attract 3,000 runners, and the numbers have continued to grow steadily ever since. This year will see around 15,000 people cross the start line, all of them hoping to make it back to the same point after enduring the 13-mile route. “Getting permission to run through King’s College and Jesus College for the first time last year was a real highlight,” Adam enthuses. “It’s a unique opportunity, and we’re really pleased to offer that again.” Adam hopes to get more university colleges involved with the race in the future, making their usually exclusive grounds accessible to the public as part of the route.

Whether you’re lacing up your trainers and taking part (good luck!), or happy to simply spectate, it’s the atmosphere that really makes the race special and keeps people coming back. “The whole city gets involved,” says Adam. “The sense of people wanting it to work and be successful really shines through.” For those interested in registering for the run, or looking to volunteer their time, you can sign up to the Cambridge Half Marathon’s database via the website (local residents are given priority on the mailing list). You can also find an official Covid-19 guide to the race at the below address, which has all the information you might need in advance of the event. cambridgehalfmarathon.com

CAMBRIDGE HALF MARATHON IN NUMBERS

Participants in the first year 3,000

Participants this year 15,000 Miles in total 13 Years running so far 10 Colleges included 2

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 27

STREET STYLE

Cambridge PHOTOGRAPHER MARK BOX SHARES SOME OF HIS FAVOURITE PORTRAITS FROM THE STREETS OF CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH – CAN YOU SPOT ANYONE YOU KNOW?

Say hello to Eleanor, a seriously vibrant human, bursting with enough colourful character and energy to brighten anyone’s day. I love meeting people who aren’t afraid to express themselves!

Humans of Cambridge is an Instagram photoblog by local photographer Mark Box. It began as a lockdown project and has turned into a local sensation, featuring an ever-growing number of Cambridge’s colourful characters on the @humanofcambridge grid. Mark is out snapping most days, and can usually be found in the Market Square, on King’s Parade, Burrell’s Walk and Garret Hostel Bridge – your best bet for being papped is to head out around lunchtime and wear something eye-catching! About the project

I was taking my usual stroll down King’s Parade when this cool couple caught my eye. He was from Liverpool and she came from Toronto. I wouldn’t be surprised if they were secretly rock stars! Two unique humans with individual styles and personalities.

Those shoes! That’s the first thing that popped in my head as I spotted this lovely human walking by. Their entire outfit was beautifully coordinated, with so many visual stimuli. I just had to approach and I’m so glad I did!

28 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

STREET STYLE

Meet Max and Vanessa. I saw these cool humans hanging out in this doorway: a perfect frame for a portrait. They were super-relaxed and a real joy to shoot! Totally dig Max’s outfit – and Vanessa’s bold colours and awesome sunglasses.

In terms of choosing who and what to shoot, I look for nuances in character and appearance. This stunning human’s hair caught my attention and I noticed they were reading a book. Not wanting to disturb – but also hoping to take their portrait – I approached and complimented their aesthetic. Shot in situ, I wanted to capture the scene as I had first seen it. Coincidentally, the book in hand had a fitting title – one to add to the reading list.

Another favourite from the past month. I met Annie while she was sitting in the grounds of St Edward King and Martyr church. I love the contrast of the blues within the greens of the foreground and background, separated by the soft lavender colour of the skirt. It was nice to capture her portrait in a different setting, adding various elements to the scene.

Here we have a splendid human whose personality shines through, with some really cool tattoos to boot! It just amazes me how friendly people can be. Building a rapport with your sitter in a matter of minutes is key to capturing their character and individuality in a photograph. Also, loving the backdrop!

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 29

LOCAL L I FE

FRANCES MCNAUGHTON MEETS THE COMMUNITY HISTORIANS CHRONICLING HISTON ROAD’S RICH PAST MAKING HISTORY Memories on the Map

IMAGES BY FARUK KARA

One of these contributors, Anna Crutchley, was very much involved in the process of extracting resonant stories. “I really loved listening to a number of different Cambridge voices,” says Anna. “Many of our interviewees had been born and brought up in Cambridge – some living in houses left to them by their parents, where they had spent happy childhoods. Those were memories of the everyday; not kings, queens and politicians. And they were lovely.” As they also live locally, the committee were occasionally surprised to come across their own relatives in the narratives. Anna continues: “I met a lovely woman (Ann Whitmore, née Free), who lived on Histon Road and had been given a bunch of flowers by my mother in 1941. Ann was only about five years old then, and she’s now 85 or 86. My parents’ house was on Huntingdon Road and had been bombed during the war. Ann and her brothers

nbeknown to the city, a team of enthusiastic locals has been hard at work for the past few years,

with the aim of commemorating close to a century of Cambridge-centred history. Their collective efforts have culminated in A Community Remembers: Histon Road ; a new book that celebrates the area’s unique heritage through photographs, stories and recorded memories. Lilian Rundblad led the oral history project, managing to secure a Co-op Local Community Fund grant, which allowed the team to print and publish the book. “During the first consultation meetings, it was heartbreaking to hear residents describing the loss of community,” Lilian recalls. “So, I applied for a grant that would unite the people. I was happy that the selection committee believed in me. We were also lucky to find professional writers and a photographer locally, becoming friends as we worked together.”

rushed around and my mother gave Ann the flowers to take home, since she no longer had a vase for them. Can you imagine that coincidence? Ann and I had never met before.” Collating the stories involved hours of thorough research. This careful work has been accompanied by similarly considered pictures, taken by local photographer Faruk Kara. The images capture personal memories included in the book, offering a glimpse into lives that the community has built around itself. “When seeing my pictures, I want people to look closely; they are snapshots in time,” says Faruk. “In the portraits, the people are the subjects, but they are very deliberately placed in familiar locations that most of us do not see when passing by.” One particular address turned out to be one of these places for Faruk: “I have walked past ten Canterbury Street just about every day for the last 22 years, and it has always held a fascination. The floor- to-ceiling bookshelves, the stacks of books and CDs growing up from the carpet, pools THE PEOPLE OF HISTON ROAD ARE AT THE HEART OF THE PROJECT

A DAY IN THE LIFE Lilian Rundblad leads Anna Crutchley, Alison Wilson and Faruk Kara across Histon Road

30 OCTOBER 2021 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

LOCAL L I FE

CIVIC PRIDE Liz Moon at Histon Road Cemetery (left), allotment owners sit with their produce (below), and Histon residents of yesteryear (above)

The Histon Road historians are offering free copies of the book to schools in the area, in the hope that it will inspire local children to find out more about their neighbourhood. The book will also be available to purchase online through its very own website. For more details, and to purchase a copy, visit histonroadmemories.uk , or get in touch via email, contact@ histonroadmemories.uk About the book

project. “We hope those in the area will be happy when they read their memories in print,” Lilian comments. “And those outside it will realise that Histon Road has a deeply interesting history, with a friendly community.” The book is a testament to the breadth and depth of heritage found in our city, if you know where to look. Many more areas may hold the key to some of Cambridge’s most emotive stories, forgotten events and fascinating memories. “I hope it reveals, and seals, the spirit we have discovered on Histon Road,” Anna concludes. “I think residents in other parts of Cambridge will be surprised to find so much of interest in a road which, for them, is mainly a route to the A14,” Alison agrees. “I would like people to feel proud of their history.”

personal and, occasionally, a bit quirky about the sitter.” Key contributor Alison Wilson sees the project as almost entirely driven by residents themselves. She is just pleased to have been involved in securing such an enduring record of local history. “I’m pleased with the way we managed to bring local people together with a common purpose, and I hope they will be proud of the finished product, which was largely written by them. There isn’t a page without quotations of their own words,” explains Alison. “Our task was to compile the memories and put them in a logical order, adding a little background material.” In terms of the committee’s hopes for the book, it’s clear that the people of Histon Road are still at the heart of the

of light created by the lamps, and a woman sat sagely in the armchair – sometimes alone, other times engaged with students. I was so excited when I heard that the lady [fellow and author, Alison Hennegan] was the neighbour of one of the committee, and even more excited that she had agreed to be photographed. “I decided to capture the landmark as the residents know it, from the outside looking in,” Faruk continues. “Getting the reflections right meant that we shot the photo on three different occasions. Each time, a neighbour appeared, to ask me what I was doing. I found it very comforting that the residents were so protective of their community.” Anna comments on the images: “Faruk’s photographs are more than just portraits; they reveal something original,

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK OCTOBER 2021 31

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100

cambsedition.co.uk

Powered by