Cambridge Edition March 2019

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ARTS & CULTURE

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FOOD & DRINK

RECIPES, FIRST-EVER RESTAURANT WEEK & THE CITY ʼ S BEST BOOZY BRUNCHES

30 YEARS OF WYSING ARTS CENTRE, THE 25TH CAMBRIDGE SCIENCE FESTIVAL & MORE

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Welcome

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EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459

nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editor Felicity Evans Junior sub editor Elisha Young ADVERTISING Senior sales executive Lee Fifield 01223 492240 leefifield@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Cathy Moore, Cyrus Pundole, Charlotte Griffiths, Siobhan Godwood, Daisy Dickinson, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Anna Taylor, Sam Owens DESIGN & PRODUCTION Senior designer & production manager Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Designer Lucy Woolcomb Junior designer Emily Lancaster Ad production Man-Wai Wong 01223 499468 manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area. FIND US @CAMBSEDITION

axing lyrical about the joys of springtime might turn out to be

premature, given last March brought us the Arctic-style apocalypse we’ve come to know as the ‘Beast from the East’, but spring is on my mind nonetheless. Thriplow Daffodil Weekend returns on the 23rd and 24th of the month, which offers a chance to see this pretty south Cambridgeshire village

blanketed in yellow blooms – pop along for vintage village fete fun including a Punch & Judy show, Morris dancing and tea and cake. We’ve got all the details on page 25. The month of March also sees the city flex its considerable intellectual muscle at the Cambridge Science Festival – a fortnight of mind-expanding free talks, performances and hands-on activities. As ever, it will be asking the big questions, taking on everything from the future of medicine to the very fate of humanity, via quantum computing, artificial intelligence, the war on plastics and a whole lot more. Read our highlights on page 26. If that inspires you to get your grey matter working, another event to check out is Sunday Papers Live: a celebration of the day of rest filled with fascinating talks, great food, Bloody Marys and comfy sofas – get your slippers at the ready and head to page 28 for the low-down. Excitingly, the beginning of next month also sees the arrival of Cambridge’s first ever Restaurant Week, which presents an irresistible opportunity to taste your way around the best of the city’s dining scene at a fraction of the usual price (page 60). Elsewhere in the issue, we pay homage to Wysing Arts Centre: the boundary-pushing contemporary arts hub in the sleepy village of Bourn, which celebrates its 30th birthday this year. A gallery, an inspiring workplace for artists and home to an annual music event named by Vogue as one of the best independent festivals in the whole country, this pioneering centre has an impact far beyond just showcasing art – as we discover on page 22. If spring does turn out to be off the table and we have to endure freezing temperatures and blizzards again this March, curling up with a really good read might be the best course of action – and we’ve got a cracker to share with you in our Book Club. Head

over to page 33 where we chat to author Madeline Miller about Circe : her unputdownable novel which transports you to an ancient land of gods, heroes, magic and monsters. As ever, we’ve also got all the gigs, theatre, food news and art exhibitions you need on your radar. Enjoy the issue and see you next month! Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Flo Thomas, senior designer & production manager at Cambridge Edition

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

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C ONTENTS

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l STARTERS Top things to do and see in the city, plus our favourite social media pics 9 l ARTS & CULTURE Exhibitions, concerts and theatre highlights to enjoy in March 21 l ART INSIDER Ruthie Collins, founder of Cambridge Art Salon, shares her arty picks of the month 22 l WYSING ARTS In celebration of it turning 30, we pay homage to Bourn’s fizzing contemporary arts centre 25 l DAFFODIL FESTIVAL We find out what’s in store at Thriplow’s weekend-long celebration of daffs 26 l SCIENCE FESTIVAL Get your grey matter working at the fascinating (and mostly free!) Cambridge Science Festival 28 l SUNDAY PAPERS LIVE

42 l COMMUNITY HUB Community events, charity news and more, from your local hub 45 l LISTINGS Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this month 50 l FOOD NEWS All the latest news and gossip from the Cambridge culinary scene 54 l RECIPES 54 A selection of delicious dishes from the Flavours of England cookbook series 60 l RESTAURANT WEEK We take a look at what’s in store for the city’s debut Restaurant Week 64 l GIN THE MONEY Meet the team behind the Cambridge Distillery, the city’s famous gin-makers 68 l MAKE THE BEST Chef Alex Rushmer creates a decadent cheesecake with a Champagne caramel sauce

Enjoy the ultimate Sunday with talks, relaxing and great food and drinks 33 l BOOK CLUB Book recommendations, special offers and author interviews 36 l AFTER HOURS Comedy, festivals, gigs and more nightlife fun to seek out this month 41 l COMPETITION

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A behind-the-scenes introduction to Vanderlyle, Mill Road’s new restaurant 72 l BOOZY BRUNCHES We round-up the best places to go in Cambridge for a morning feast with cocktails 76 l DRINKS TROLLEY Wine tips, cocktail recipes and our favourite local drinking dens 79 l WEDDINGS Inspiration for planning your perfect big day, from venues to cakes 91 l BEAUTY Daisy Dickinson rounds up the beauty products on her radar this month 92 l INDIE We shine a spotlight on The Geographer, a deli, cafe and gift shop in Impington 95 l HOME EDITION Property news, interiors inspiration and news on the Cambridge Home + Garden Show

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FLIPPING EXCELLENT MARCH ESSENTIAL

This year’s Pancake Day falls on Tuesday 5 March and, if you want to get in on the fun, we recommend a visit to The Petersfield on Sturton Street. If you’ve tried their brunch, you’ll know this pub never fails to turn out perfect pancakes. They’re going all out with stacks of delicious sweet or savoury toppings, including fresh blueberries and Nutella. If you’re feeling competitive, order yourself a stack of 16: if you manage to get through this batter-y behemoth, it’s on the house! thepetersfield.co.uk

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STARTERS

MUM’S THE WORD

Give your mum the mother of all Mother’s Days on 31 March – there are plenty of lovely treats to be had locally. Madingley Hall, an elegant country house set in magnificent gardens, is hosting a Mother’s Day Lunch (£30), where you can enjoy a roast dinner, plus desserts like salted caramel tart. Or, over at the Quy Mill Hotel & Spa, you can enjoy an afternoon tea with prosecco for £24 per person. If you want to really pamper her, Bedford Lodge Hotel Spa is offering a Mum and Me Spa Day package, which includes access to all heat and hydrotherapy facilities, the rooftop hot tub, experiential showers, steam room, sauna and choice of a manicure or pedicure, plus a champage afternoon tea. It’s £85 per person. Alternatively, over at The Cambridge Brew House, you and your mum can get stuck into a gin tasting with the Cambridge Distillery, which includes masterclass and a G&T (£15), followed by a Sunday roast in the restaurant if you want to make a day of it. If you’ve got kids in tow, they’ve got you covered too – upstairs, The Locker Room will be packed with games, bean bags, films and hands-on activities to keep little ones entertained.

ONE TO TRY

Feast on melty cheese while enjoying the genius of one of the greatest bands ever next month at Fleetwood & Fondue: a night of music, food and fun on 10 April. While your ears are enjoying hits like Go Your Own Way and Everywhere , your tastebuds will be delighted by a starter, plus a range of fondues and accompaniments, as well as some carefully selected wines and cocktails. It takes place at The Senate and is priced at £35 per person. thesenatebistro.com FLEETWOOD & FONDUE

The Cambridge-born microcomputer that has become a bona fide global phenomenon, Raspberry Pi has now moved to the high street, opening its first shop in the Grand Arcade. Conceived as a way to get kids into coding and put the power of computing into their hands, this tiny, affordable, single-board computer has now shifted more than 22 million units. The new shop will serve as an experiential space where visitors can try their hand at programming, as well as purchase products and discover a collaborative ‘playspace’ to create and display Pi-powered innovations – from drones to robots. The new shop will also offer a new ‘Everything you need to get started with Raspberry Pi’ kit, which includes the latest Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, with a complete set of official peripherals and everything a beginner needs to get started with programming their PC. raspberrypi.org PIECE OF THE PI

Watch the new lambs frolicking about at the farm at Wimpole Estate and learn a bit about them, too, during the lambing season, running 27 April – 12 May. Each spring, Wimpole’s 300 rare breeds give birth to several hundred new additions to the flock – mostly during April so, if you’re really lucky, you might even see a new arrival being born! nationaltrust.org.uk LAMBING AT WIMPOLE

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Culture Club

ART EXHIBITIONS • THEATRE • BOOK CLUB • CONCERTS

RITUALIA by Scottish Dance Theatre can be seen at Saffron Hall on 1 June

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ARTS & CULTURE

YOKO ONO

Image Yoko Ono performing Cut Piece (1964) at Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, March 25, 1965

An iconic artist’s work is to be celebrated across the city in a multi-site exhibition, Yoko Ono: Looking For… Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Ono ’ s first visit to Cambridge and her debut public concert with John Lennon, at Lady Mitchell Hall on 2 March, 1969, it’s a chance to find out more about the artist and a hidden gem of Cambridge’s social history. 50 years on to the day, a plaque will be unveiled in the foyer at Lady Mitchell Hall, where a live recording of the concert Cambridge 1969 will be played for visitors and can be heard until the end of the year. Ono was a leading artist of the Fluxus movement and a pioneer of conceptual art, as part of the New York underground avant-garde scene in the late 50s and early 60s. She still creates thought-provoking art and music that challenges our view of the world. The exhibition will feature more than 90 early, recent and newworks. Her wide body of work includes text, painting, sculpture, installation, performance, music, film and video. Posters of Toilet Thoughts Film No. 3 , from 1997, will be displayed in toilets within restaurants, pubs and elsewhere, inviting people to write their thoughts on them. A selection of word pieces, also on posters, will be in populated areas of the city, encouraging a contemplation beyond what is immediately seen. The Heong Gallery will host Sky Pieces , an exhibition within an exhibition, from June to October, demonstrating Yoko Ono’s fascination with the sky. It’s been a feature of her work since the early 60s, used as a metaphor for peace and freedom. Performances, film screenings and a walking tour also feature within a wide-ranging celebration of the artist, running through to the end of the year. The posters and the concert recording form the main focus for the next few months. Admission to all exhibitions and events is free. imaginepeace.com Right Yoko Ono, Wish Tree (1996/2013), installation at Yoko Ono: Half a Wind Show, Louisiana Museum, Denmark Far right Yoko Ono, Fly (1996) billboard installed in Richmond, Virginia

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Hinterland, an exhibition of affordable artwork for the home, is the first to be curated by Beau Art Interiors and runs from 1 to 3 and 7 to 10 March at Fen Ditton Gallery. The creation of harmonious interior spaces is at the heart of Beau Art Interiors’ outlook, and the exhibition features emerging and established artists, with pieces featuring paintings on canvas, framed works on paper and a selection of ceramics, furniture and textiles. Artists and designers include Lucy Burley, Jo Davies, Oliver Hilton and Angeline Tournier. fendittongallery.com HINTERLAND

FOOTLIGHTS

Today’s crop of top talent at Footlights – Cambridge University’s finishing school for some of the best comedians, writers and actors in the country during the last 60 years – comes to the Arts Theatre on 12 and 19 March. You’ll often find Footlights comics performing at late-night ‘smokers’ at the ADC, but here’s your chance to catch them a little earlier in the day. Presidents down the years have included Peter Cook, Richard Ayoade, Eric Idle, Sue Perkins, Hugh Laurie and Inbetweeners’ Simon Bird, with Germaine Greer, Emma Thompson and Stephen Fry just some of the many other members who’ve gone on to hugely successful careers. And, if you’re pushed for time to get food, you can pre- order a deli box from nearby Aromi to enjoy before the

The Art Hound Gallery has a couple of exclusive print releases from the artist who created the iconic album artwork for David Bowie’s Hunky Dory and Ziggy Stardust . Terry Pastor has created two variants of digital images celebrating French electro hit-makers Daft Punk. Featuring the duo’s robotic helmets, and in classic pop art style, you can see them at the Art Hound Gallery, and also online, from 1 March. arthoundgallery.com NEW AT THE ART HOUND

show. Tickets are from £13. cambridgeartstheatre.com

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ARTS & CULTURE

DANCE AT SAFFRON HALL

Award-winning Saffron Walden venue Saffron Hall has unveiled a glittering programme of dance events for its spring season, including several striking new commissions and family events. The Hall, which celebrates its fifth birthday this season, is establishing itself as a home for dance in the region, attracting world-class performers and revolutionary productions. 8 March sees Boy Blue – whose performances have been described by the New York Times as “the force of an uprising” – take to the stage with the brand-new Project R.E.B.E.L . This energetic and moving work explores social tensions and cultural identity in 21st century Britain and also features an appearance from Saffron Walden County High School students. Scotland’s national contemporary dance company, Scottish Dance Theatre, stops by on 1 June to perform RITUALIA , a visual feast which reimagines Igor Stravinsky’s ballet Les Noces . It’s paired with a brand-new commission by world- renowned choreographer Emanuel Gat, which has been specially created for the

dance company based on his intense work with individual dancers within the troupe. The next day, Scottish Dance Theatre presents Innocence : a magical theatrical journey designed to engage young children with the medium of dance through movement, live music and animal noises. Then, on 13 July, the National Youth Dance Company presents MADHEAD , which fuses contemporary dance, physical theatre and hip-hop. “Establishing a home for dance at Saffron Hall is incredibly important to us, as it’s a hugely integral part of UK culture, which is something we constantly aim to offer our community to the highest standard, and I’m incredibly proud of the calibre of performers that the Hall attracts,” comments Angela Dixon, chief executive. “The inclusion of dance in our varied programme ensures that Saffron Hall continues to act as the artistic hub of East England, creating an exceptional space to enrich the community and inspire the next generation of artists.” saffronhall.com

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EASTER AT KINGS

The Cambridge-based Academy of Ancient Music, an internally revered period instrument orchestra, will perform a duo of Easter concerts next month in the sublime setting of the King’s College Chapel. Easter at Kings: Bach St Matthew Passion will see conductor Stephen Cleobury join the King’s College Choir to present Bach’s musical telling of Christ’s final hours on earth, under the chapel’s famous vaulted ceiling. The iconic score for vocal soloists, two choirs and two orchestras combines drama with devotion like no other. It questions, challenges and reassures, and contains some of the most beautiful and exquisitely crafted music from a composer who excelled in both those fields. The show will run on 15 and 16 April and tickets start at £15. aam.co.uk

PAPER CINEMA : MACBETH A captivating silent film-esque version of Macbeth is promised by Paper Cinema when they visit The Junction on 11 March. Shakespeare’s tragedy is vividly told with illustration, puppetry, film and a live score to create Scottish landscapes, storms, betrayal and, of course, a murderous plot. Tickets are £12.50. junction.co.uk

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THE STORE ROOM

Attached to the side of Devonshire Road wine shop Vinopolis, The Store Room by David Lolly Gallery is a new ‘micro gallery’ that’s promising to present a series of exciting contemporary art exhibitions over the coming months. The diminutive space, which will showcase the work of a small selection of British and Spanish artists, is run by Daniel Dunt, who was inspired to open a gallery after managing an arts magazine, Tallulah . “An actual gallery was always the aim. So last June I set up David Lolly Gallery with some of the artists that I’d featured in Tallulah . They were artists whose work I admired and who I felt were doing something different. I began with four artists, and I was doing a lot of online promotion. There was some traction, but it was fairly quiet, so I thought: I need a physical space. I decided to stop obsessing over getting international clients and bring it back to local people who are just interested in this kind of work.” The debut exhibition was Night Fishing , a series of bold abstracts by Gina Parr, followed by this month’s show by her photographer husband Ian Hoskin. Then, it’s over to Juan López Salvador, a Spanish sculptor working mainly with steel and wood. In addition to the initial series of month-long mini exhibitions, Daniel hopes to show work from David Lolly Gallery in other venues around the city in the future. “I am looking to grow The Store Room as a ‘must drop-in’ in Cambridge, for art lovers, collectors and tourists alike – to have this as a central base along with an online presence. And then from there I want to use this as a way to network and build a community of people that are interested in the arts in the city and then if I can, take some of the large-scale works and show them in other spaces. It’s not just about selling, it’s about promoting the artist and building their profile, because they’re fantastic.” davidlollygallery.com

Images (1st row, L-R) Gina Parr, Night approaches , Jim Cooke, Microscope series (2nd Row, apresando un reflejo , Ian Hoskin, Defaced #4060 (3rd Row, L-R) Juan López Salvador, Cliff, and Gina Parr, Clearing L-R) Gabriela Messuti, Hilos

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ARTS & CULTURE

Rising Festival, the one-day event that brings together speakers for thought-provoking talks and workshops, returns on 9 March, a day after International Women’s Day. More than 30 speakers at St Barnabas Church will share personal stories, tips for success and thoughts on the most fundamental issues facing women today. So take a pause from the daily grind, step back and regain some clarity. Hipster veggie Jaspreet Kaur, Dame Mary Archer and Dr Kamel Hothi are among the speakers. The festival is a great opportunity to leave wiser, full of ideas and with a fresh perspective, possibly with some new contacts too. Refreshments are available throughout the day, plus a near- endless supply of fruit from The Cambridge Fruit Company. therisingnetwork.com RISING FESTIVAL Exploring the complex relationship between devotion, myth and sexuality, Peter Schaffer’s psychological thriller Equus comes to the Arts Theatre from 27 to 30March. When teenager Alan Strang’s pathological fascination leads to the blinding of six horses in a Hampshire stable, a psychiatrist is tasked with uncovering the motive, but ends up questioning his own sanity. Award-winning director Ned Bennett creates a bold new production of the critically-acclaimed classic. Tickets from £20. cambridgeartstheatre.com EQUUS

BALLET BLACK

Ballet Black, now in its 18th year, visits the Arts Theatre on 7 and 8 May with a programme that contrasts dramatic and inventive storytelling in a showcase of modern ballet. Among a triple bill of works, Ingoma , created by company dancer and choreographer Mthuthuzeli November, fuses ballet, African dance and singing. Also performed will be Martin Lawrance’s intimate duet Pendulum , and a lighthearted work by Scottish Ballet’s choreographer-in-residence, Sophie Laplane. Tickets from £20. cambridgeartstheatre.com

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5 MINUTES WITH... Nigel Harman THE FORMER EASTENDERS STAR TELLS US ABOUT APPEARING IN DAVID MAMET’S RAZOR-SHARP DRAMA GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS, WHICH COMES TO CAMBRIDGE ARTS THEATRE THIS MARCH

ARTS & CULTURE

be to make a sale and he’s very good at it. Morally his compass is a long way off, but if you get caught in his tractor beam you think he’s really cool. It’s only afterwards you realise he’s probably been speaking a load of rubbish and he’s just taken 40 grand from you. THE PLAY IS MORE THAN 30 YEARS OLD. WHAT’S THE SECRET TO ITS LONGEVITY? I think it’s really interesting looking at it through a prism of today, because this is set in 1983 and these guys are already becoming obsolete. Their skills, their mindset, their brash demeanour; they realise everything they value is rapidly becoming less valuable. But you could also argue that the guy sitting in the White House at the moment comes from that salesman era, so it’s still so relevant… MANY WILL KNOW THE STORY FROM THE OSCAR-NOMINATED FILM VERSION; WHAT DOES SEEING IT ON STAGE BRING TO THE STORY? It was written as a play, so it’s designed to be live. The film is really good, but I think the play is better. Live theatre is special because you can smell it. Literally. Every evening is unique; whatever you come in with will affect how you interpret the show. The way the audience has travelled, if they’ve had a good day at work, if they’ve had a hard day, if it’s raining outside – everything is set up for that one

moment, that unique evening. If you get moved in the theatre it’s so much more powerful than being moved by the screen. PEOPLE STILL RECOGNISE YOU MOST FROM EASTENDERS. WHAT WAS THAT EXPERIENCE LIKE? It was quite a rollercoaster ride. I look back on the whole thing and I’m incredibly proud to have been a part of that show which is still doing its thing. One day I’d like to sit down and watch an episode. I was always working, so I never watched much of it. Maybe one day I can go back and direct an episode to be part of that gang again, because they’re a really special bunch. There are some people who think I’ve retired, just because I’m no longer in EastEnders! WHAT CAN AUDIENCES EXPECT FROM THE SHOW? You can expect a rollercoaster ride of a show. It’s in your face, it’s provocative and it’s evocative of the time, but it also really makes you laugh. The brilliant thing about this show is we’ll be done by 9.30pm. You can go and have a three-course meal afterwards, and still be home by 11.30pm! It’s literally my perfect theatre outing. Glengarry Glen Ross runs 11 to 16 March at Cambridge Arts Theatre, tickets from £20. cambridgeartstheatre.com

WHAT’S GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS ABOUT? It’s about a group of salesmen in 1980s Chicago who are in a tense sales competition. Someone will win a Cadillac, someone will get a set of steak knives and the other two will get fired, so basically their lives are in the balance. At the same time, the office gets broken into and it’s likely to have been one of our main protagonists, so it’s also a whodunnit. It’s one of the great American plays written in the last 40 years. It’s a brilliant part to play and it’s incredibly challenging. Ricky Roma is very bright. He’s street smart. He presents himself as a happily married man, but he can be one of the lads too. He can be whatever he needs to HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CHARACTER, RICKY ROMA?

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The Art Insider RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH L ouise Bourgeois, one of the world’s most acclaimed female artists, is currently exhibited at Kettle’s Yard until 24 March. never lost its magic, it has never lost its mystery, and it has never lost its drama,” Bourgeois once said. “All of my work of the last 50 years, all my subjects, have found their inspiration in my childhood.” On 9 March, for International Women’s Day, there is a day of talks, workshops Logan, Jill Ogilvy and Deanna Tyson. Stray will hold its first exhibition at the Old Fire Engine House in Ely, until 31 March. The vibrant and wide-ranging show includes painting, sculpture, textiles, drawings and handmade, limited-edition

The exhibition draws on Artist Rooms , a touring collection of over 1,600 works of modern and contemporary art by more than 40 major artists. Also exhibited alongside Bourgeois is a collection of Julie Mehretu’s drawings and monotypes; the artist’s first solo exhibition in a public gallery in the UK, it’s inspired by pressing issues, from race riots in the USA to the war in Syria. Bourgeois died in 2010 aged 91 and was most known for her large-scale installations – and her iconic spiders, which first appeared in her work in 1947. The spider, as we all know, is one of the most feared species of the animal world, but its ancient symbolism has its roots in nothing to do with fear – and everything to do with creative power. Like artists, spiders ‘weave’ work. Just like Louise Bourgeois’ mother did; she was a tapestry restorer who died when Louise was 21. “I shall never tire of representing her,” she wrote about her mother in Ode – a poem published a year after her sculpture, Spider, was made. “I want to eat, sleep, argue, hurt, destroy/Why do you?/My reasons being exclusively to me/The treatment of fear.” So what better treat than this show plus a coffee in the gorgeous Garden Kitchen at Kettle’s Yard? “My childhood has

prints. “The diversity and quality of work that Stray creates is ideal for the gallery here, ” says Ann Jarman, curator and owner of the Old Fire Engine House. “ Mixed shows are very popular with our visitors who appreciate a wide range of contemporary art which is exciting, challenging and accessible and we hope Stray will be a great start to 2019.” While plotting your nights out at the Corn Exchange, look out for the work of illustrator Cecelia Wood, giving the cover of the brochure a fresh, quirky new look. Cambridge Corn Exchange has teamed up with Cambridge School of Art at Anglia Ruskin to produce a hand-drawn and created design for the cover, depicting the venue with its stunning Florentine Gothic façade dating from 1875. “I’m currently in my final year studying Illustration at Cambridge School of Art. This project was a really exciting opportunity to work on a live brief, to create an illustration of Cambridge landmarks, ” says Cecelia. Finally, those looking for a springtime lift may love the Liberty Ball at Fulbourn Lodge on 16 March, in aid of Arthur Rank Hospice, Classworks Theatre and Fulbourn Youth Theatre. With a sparkling reception, 20s and 30s dress theme, food, cabaret and games (intriguing!), this looks set to be a fantastic night out. Classworks Theatre is one of the longest running theatre charities in Cambridge, and it’s such a fantastic cause – the company also

and pop-up performances planned at Kettle’s Yard, too – all fabulous. Check the full programme on the website. Also watch out for Cheryl Warren’s Immersions in Landscape at Espresso Library. Impressive large-scale abstracts have long been making a name for this fantastic Cambridge artist. Warren originally trained in sculpture at Bretton Hall, before going to Goldsmiths, where she took a postgraduate mixed media course. As well as holding an MA in Art Therapy, she’s been a professional artist for 21 years. “My inspiration has long been environments, both external and internal. There’s an interaction between the two that’s long been of interest to me,” she says. You can see the influence of light, texture and scale in her work – with mesmerising presence. Don’t miss Independent Cambridge Indie Arts presents Landscapes at the Library featuring Cheryl Warren, Anne Beamish and Steve Linford, on 14 March. Also make a beeline for Stray, a collective of artists working across a range of disciplines in Cambridge, including Rosemary Catling, Manuela Hubner, Sue Law, Alison Litherland, Judy

“My inspiration has long been environments, internal and external. There’s an interaction between the two”

houses amazing costumes from the 1840s to the 1950s. Contact helenkingsley1@ gmail.com for tickets. Have a fabulous springtime, all. l

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ARTS & CULTURE

Artistic Triump h IN CELEBRATION OF WYSING ARTS CENTRE’S 30TH ANNIVERSARY, RUTHIE COLLINS CONSIDERS THE LEGACY OF THIS BOUNDARY-PUSHING ARTISTIC HUB AND LOOKS TO WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS

“W ysing today has been 30 years in the making, but it’s also a chance to think about the future,” enthuses Jo Marsh, chair of Wysing Arts Centre. She is radiating positivity about the 30-year celebrations, which started in February this year. Founded 30 years ago as what Jo describes as an “inspirational workplace for artists” in the tranquil village of Bourn just outside Cambridge, it’s a ‘cultural campus’ set amid 11 acres. It boasts sculptures, studios, a Grade II listed farmhouse, a music recording studio, a gallery and a critically acclaimed public programme. The last 30 years have seen Wysing really develop and come into its own in the UK as a flagship arts organisation – pioneering risk, experimentation and the exchange of ideas. “That original mission remains today, it just gets activated in different ways,” explains Jo. “Two of the four original founders of Wysing Arts Centre are still on our board and are very much the heart and soul of the organisation. They are still there at the centre of what we do – along with the artists.” The anniversary is also a crucial chance to look at the highlights of the organisation’s 30 years. “We are taking a leadership role in terms of diversity and

inclusion – a lot of arts organisations can struggle with this. But Wysing has forged ahead with how to programme artists from different ethnicities and genders – marginalised voices,” continues Jo. You can see this reflected throughout the centre’s programming, team and operations. Wysing’s annual music festival is no exception, navigating that interdisciplinary line where art and music meet. Feted last year as one of the UK’s ‘most valuable’ music festivals by The Guardian , it’s programmed a fiercely

diverse range of international art – with help from the likes of guest curator Camae Ayewa, aka Moor Mother. In 2014, it championed female talent, making women the primary focus of the festival. Wysing’s celebrations kick off with The View From Behind The Futuristic Rose Trellis , an immersive multimedia opera by Ravioli Me Away – a trio with a distinct, subversive edge. The production is on tour before a second performance of the opera at Wysing on 30 March – which is unfortunately already sold out – but you

“As space for artists to work becomes increasingly hard to find, Wysing’s offer only becomes more crucial, thirty years on”

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can see the associated exhibition up until 14 April. Over the summer, an expanded alumni exhibition is being planned across the whole site, which is going to bring back some of the amazing artists Wysing Arts Centre has worked with over the years. “It’s incredible when you look at the alumni, but we aren’t here to make claim to that, we celebrate how they go into the world,” Jo adds. An artist archivist residency is also being planned with Helen Cammock, a winner of the Max Mara Prize for Women, plus a residency with curator Taylor Le Melle which will present a series of symposia in May focused on revisiting questions posed by Wysing around urgent issues facing society from their 25th year. “The things that concern us are not just in our own country – they are issues that also have a far-reaching impact. We were born out of a turbulent era; it shapes us. We aren’t in a vacuum and I’m proud of how Wysing has become a place of refuge for artists,” Jo explains. Wysing Arts Centre was the first arts organisation to offer a Safe Haven residency as part of the ARTISTS at RISK

Network (ECVAN), whose pioneering project, New Geographies, invited the public to nominate often overlooked locations across the east of England for site-specific public art commissions. “It’s clear it’s acting outside the commercial gallery system. It’s not about commercial intent, product – it’s about production. It has influence on artists at a key time in their careers,” says Jo. As space for artists to work becomes increasingly hard to find, Wysing’s offer only becomes more crucial, thirty years on. With plans to launch a new patrons scheme, Producers Circle, to help support the centre, there’s scope for people to help ensure its work continues to grow, too. Much deserved – as Jo says, “it’s an incredible place.” l

(AR) network, offering refuge for artists being persecuted in their own countries. “Unless you take steps, we won’t have a diverse artworld,” Jo adds. Instrumental to implementing the vision of Wysing Arts Centre has been director of 13 years, Donna Lynas – an inspiration to many. “She has been absolutely pioneering this work. Donna has always been clear Wysing is an organisation that values difference.” Jo continues: “I think, in a world that seems to increasingly fear difference, the work we do at Wysing is even more relevant and vital than ever.” As an Arts Council England National Portfolio Organisation, Wysing Arts Centre is also part of Plus Tate and chair of the East Contemporary Visual Arts

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WITH THRIPLOW DAFFODIL WEEKEND POISED TO RETURN WITH A FLURRY OF COLOUR AND FUN, WE SEE WHAT’S IN STORE F l ower pow e r WORDS BY CYRUS PUNDOLE

T he blooming marvellous on 23 and 24 March. Around 14,000 people are expected to descend on the picturesque south Cambridgeshire village for the spectacle, which will see the whole area go car-free for the weekend. The spring flowers bring warmth and colour after the long winter, and the dedicated team of 350 volunteers from the village and surrounding areas will be crossing their fingers for fair weather. Last year was a little challenging, with snow over the weekend following the end of the Beast from the East shortly before the event. It was the coldest daffodil weekend for 50 years. Nevertheless, there were still thousands of visitors, meaning that charities benefitted to the tune of at least £18,000. The nominated charity is Rosie Maternity Hospital, with Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust keen to raise funds for essential equipment needed by the Acute Neonatal Transport Service (ANTS) and Thriplow Daffodil Weekend, one of the biggest community and charity events in the area, returns

the neonatal intensive care unit, to help support newborn and vulnerable babies across the East of England. Visitors park up just outside Thriplow to stroll briefly through the lanes (often with sheep and lambs heard bleating in the background) before getting to the heart of the village, full of stalls, rides and tasty eats. This year there are 15 new heritage varieties among the 100 types of daffodils – with organisers confirming the first buds were spotted by early January. Expect to see dog agility displays, Morris dancing, steam engines, classic cars, face painting, traditional crafts displays, animal displays, live music and all things street food at the Taste of Thriplow, with everything from curries and tapas to cakes and tea. There are also events and stalls in a marquee next to the school, which is where you will find the arts and crafts stalls and a children’s area. Grab a programme to help you find the various different areas of the festival. In the Country Thriplow section, drive mini Land Rovers and watch a dog hay bale

run, a family dog show and (Sunday only) a gun dog scurry. There will also be birds of prey and you can try your hand at archery. Live music can be found at The Green Man pub, there’s a tea room in the village hall and you can find blacksmith demonstrations in The Smithy (where else!). If you’re on the lookout for alcohol, the beer tent is at Taste of Thriplow, where, as well as food stalls, there are school recitals and more music, too. As well as volunteering, many residents take the opportunity to open their gardens to the public too, so visitors can enjoy a stroll around the village. Organisers take care to ensure that the stalls throughout the village, whether it’s crafts, gifts, food or things for the garden, offer a broad appeal for all ages and tastes. A family day ticket, for two adults and two children, costs £20 with adults £7.20 and children (5 to 16) £3.60 – prices include a 10% discount for buying your tickets in advance via the website. l thriplowdaffodils.org.uk

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CAMBR I DGE SCI ENCE F EST I VAL

RETURNING WITH MORE THAN 350 EVENTS, CAMBRIDGE SCIENCE FESTIVAL CELEBRATES ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY Here comes the science!

WORDS BY CYRUS PUNDOLE

T his year’s Cambridge Science Festival is celebrating its 25th anniversary – the same year the periodic table turns 150 and Cambridge Philosophical Society, the city’s oldest science body, turns 200. The festival will run for two weeks across a range of venues from 11 to 24 March, and the broad theme is ‘discoveries’. Find out how the next 25 years may pan out on our precious planet, with more than 350 events that examine the issues affecting us today – from climate change to mental health in teenagers and young people, to improving healthcare. You can expect big questions to be posed about the cutting edge of technology, such as: how will quantum computers change the world? As ever, there will be debates, talks, exhibitions, workshops, activities, films, comedy and performances in lecture theatres, museums, cafes and galleries throughout the city. Some of the biggest names in science will be there, including the Astronomer Royal, Professor Lord Martin Rees, 2018 Nobel Prize-winner Sir Gregory Winter and THIS Institute director Professor Mary Dixon-Woods. Quantum computing, AI, big data and the effects of technology on our well-being

all come under the spotlight. Quantum computing is tipped to revolutionise the world, with huge amounts being invested in making it a reality. Should we be getting excited about it? Dr Ulrich Schneider from the Cavendish Laboratory considers the claims in Quantum Computers: the Ultimate Tools for Discovery, on 18 March at Jesus College. In What Will My Quantum Computer Do For Me? PhD student Mithuna Yoganathan answers the simple question most of us don’t understand: what is a quantum computer? On 23 March, you can catch Making Alexa Smarter – AI at Scale, which features Dr Craig Saunders, head of applied science at Amazon Alexa Knowledge, discussing the ‘brains’ behind the groundbreaking virtual assistant at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. For those with younger children, one of the main events, offering a one-stop experience across numerous areas of study, are the hands-on days at the Guildhall. From 10am to 5pm on 16 March, and 12pm to 4pm on 17 March, there will be a wide range of things to try, guess and find out about. There’s chemistry in the home, CSI: from Fingers to Footwear, the Secret Lives of Cells (Saturday only), genomics (Sunday

only), exercise and energy, how muscles work, ageing, bacteria and much more. Being able to decode the entire DNA sequence and determine mutations that can cause rare genetic diseases and cancer has been perhaps the biggest breakthrough of recent years. Dr David Bentley, chief scientist at Illumina, and professor Mark Caulfield, chief scientist at Genomics England, consider the potential benefits in 100,000 Genomes Project: Transforming Precision Healthcare, on 13 March. “The Genomic Medicine Service is the first of its kind where genomics will be embedded into a national health system, and it will transform routine healthcare in the UK,” Professor Caulfield says. Also celebrating an anniversary this year is the Pentacle Club, commemorating 100 years. Founded by eminent mathematician WW Rouse Ball, it was originally for members of Cambridge University interested in magic. Members met to learn techniques and perform playlets at the annual shows in the ’20s, which included a golfer having his leg sawn off and a patient being decapitated, with the severed head smoking a cigarette. These days, most of the membership comes from Cambridge and nearby. The club has teamed up with the festival for a magical, family friendly journey through science discovery on 17 March at Cambridge Junction. It aims to show magic is out there through a mind- bending journey featuring breakthroughs made at the university. There are also several events considering climate change; the stark realities, latest findings and political solutions. In Climate Change: An Evening With James Lovelock,

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HIGHLIGHTS

IS TECHNOLOGY MAKING US MISERABLE? 11 March  Jesus College Despite being always on, are we any better off and are we better connected? WITH SUCH A HUGE RANGE OF EVENTS (MORE THAN 350) THROUGHOUT THE FORTNIGHT, WE RECOMMEND A LOOK THROUGH THE PROGRAMME, BUT HERE ARE SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS 12 March  Mill Lane Lecture Rooms Could research outcomes reset attitudes towards the risks of radiation? THE UNIVERSE OF BLACK HOLES 13 March  Babbage Lecture Theatre Professor Christopher Reynolds describes how future research into the most powerful forces we know of may change our view of reality. THE LONG-TERM PERSPECTIVE OF CLIMATE CHANGE 14 March  Department of Geography, Downing Place A panel of experts considers the challenges faced when applying research to the policy-making process. CAMBRIDGE GRAVITY LECTURE: SIR GREGORY WINTER 18 March  St Catharine’s College The molecular biologist’s research has led to antibody therapies for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. POLAR OCEAN: THE DEAD END OF PLASTIC DEBRIS 19 March  The Polar Museum Dr Clara Manno explores current research and the existing situation in the polar regions. RELUCTANT FUTURIST 19 March  Babbage Lecture Theatre Mark Stevenson asks how we can reinvent ourselves for the next 30 years. PUTTING RADIOACTIVITY IN PERSPECTIVE

“Find out how the next 25 years may pan out”

the doctor widely regarded as the father figure of our current climate concerns talks with Professor Chris Rapley and scientist and TV presenter Dr Helen Czerski about pressing issues – including whether humanity can hope to fix the problem. Similarly, Abigail Burns, from the UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre, explores global agriculture and conservation in Farming of the Future: Alternative Options for Agriculture and Conservation on 21 March. “Meat consumption is on the rise, driven by increasing populations and the rise of affluent diets – contributing to catastrophic climate change. On the flip side, climate change is increasingly impacting on agricultural production,” she explains. Sport seems trivial by comparison, but if you’ve ever wondered how to take the perfect penalty or where to go for the best chance to set a world record, Dr Tom Crawford advises on how to use maths to up your game in Maths vs Sport, on 23 March at Cavendish Laboratory. l Booking is now open. You can download the full Cambridge Science Festival programme at sciencefestival.cam.ac.uk

MAKING ALGORITHMS TRUSTWORTHY

21 March  Mill Lane Lecture Rooms How do we check the algorithms that are increasingly making judgements about our lives?

ON THE FUTURE: PROSPECTS FOR HUMANITY

22 March  Babbage Lecture Theatre Professor Lord Martin Rees argues that our future on Earth and in space depends on us taking a different approach.

Images The 25th Cambridge Science Festival promises to be an exciting two weeks, with plenty of activities for everyone

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SUNDAY PAPERS L I VE

ENJOY THE ULTIMATE DAY OF REST WITH FOOD, DRINK, TALKS AND ENTERTAINMENT AT SUNDAY PAPERS LIVE THIS MONTH Sunda y Best H

ow do you build the perfect Sunday? There would be tasty food, of course, and a couple of drinks – perhaps a Bloody Mary or a large glass of red. There would be slippers, sofas, strolling and leisurely leafing through piles of Sunday supplements. Sound like heaven? Turn your feet to Cambridge Wine Merchants’ bar at the University Centre on 24 March for Sunday Papers Live: a totally indulgent day filled with feasting, fascinating talks and fabulous performances. The event, which started life in London, comes our way courtesy of My Little Festival, the first-class local event hosts known for Wild Wood Disco and family festival Rumpus, as part of this year’s Science Festival. The big idea is to bring the Sunday newspapers to life, section by section, performance by performance, while you relax and enjoy some quality downtime. “Programming the Cambridge Science Festival edition of Sunday Papers Live is always a joy,” says Alex Ruczaj, marketing director for My Little Festival. “There is such a wealth of talented and fascinating speakers, it’s hard to narrow down the list so it fits into one day! But we have, once again, got an incredible line-up. It will be such a varied day and there will be plenty of mimosas, Bloody Marys and beanbags to help you relax and soak up all the fascinating information.” Holding court will be some of the city’s most engaging speakers, including Emma Liu, research fellow in volcanology

at the University of Cambridge, who’ll be discussing her pioneering drone- based work in Papua New Guinea, which is helping scientists predict the timing of future eruptions. Viren Swami, psychology professor, will be on the stage too, recounting his experience of post- natal depression in Dad’s Get Sad, Too, while biological anthropologist Sarah- Louise Decrausaz invites you on a tour of the human skeleton, looking at what it can teach us about people living in the past and today. Foodies should seek out Charlotte Payne’s talk, where she’ll discuss how insects could be on their way to becoming a staple part of our diets, plus how and why groups of people living in central rural Japan get together to hunt down nests of giant hornets – the deadliest creature in the country – and how they cook (and drink!) them afterwards. There’s more creepy crawlies chat with Ed Turner, curator of insects at the Museum of Zoology, who’ll be considering why wildlife has declined dramatically in the UK countryside, but thrives in pockets of urban green space. He’ll also be arming you with the know-how to turn your garden into an outstanding miniature nature reserve. There’s travel,

NEED TO KNOW WHAT: A chance to see the Sunday papers brought to life while you relax and enjoy geat food, drink and hands-on activities. WHERE: Cambridge Wine Merchants bar in the University Centre, Granta Place HOW MUCH: £15 per adult, £5 for ages 12-18, free for under 12s (but the event is geared towards older ages). Tickets can be purchased online at via Ticket Tailor and sciencefestival.cam.ac.uk WHEN: 24 March

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