Cambridge Edition November 2019

YOU R MON T H L Y F I X OF LOCA L L I F E

NOV EMB E R 2 019

SEASON’S EATINGS THE COSIEST FEASTS IN TOWN

TOP CHRISTMAS MARKETS TO VISIT F E S T I V E FA I R S FESTIVALS, CONCERTS & ART NOT TO MISS CU L T U R E C L U B

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

SIGN UP TO OUR WEEKLY DIGITAL NEWSLET TER

EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459

nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editor Felicity Evans Junior sub editor Elisha Young ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Senior sales executive Harriet Abbs 01223 499464 harrietabbs@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Chris Jacobs 01223499463 chrisjacobs@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Cyrus Pundole, Charlotte Griffiths, Siobhan Godwood, Sue Bailey, Daisy Dickinson, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Anna Taylor, Charlotte Phillips DESIGN & PRODUCTION Designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK Senior designer Laura Bryant Ad production Man-Wai Wong

ooking back over past issues of Cambridge Edition , we seem to have a yearly tradition of going mad for food and drink coverage in November. For some reason, this time of year always yields an anomalous volume of new restaurants, and – perhaps some primitive impulse to stockpile calories for the colder weather ahead? – sitting down to a hearty, cosy feast seems to be at the forefront of everyone’s minds. Whether vestigial urge, a collective loosening of our belts in anticipation of the excesses

of Christmas, or a simple desire for comfort food now the weather’s turned miserable, one thing’s for sure: feasting season has arrived – and we’ve got a whole lot of deliciousness in this issue to celebrate. Our annual winter dining guide is back with a smorgasbord of excellent eateries, from cosy cafes to fine-dining spots – turn to page 85 for a mouth-watering selection of fantastic feasts and where to find them. Chef Alex has got a warming saffron risotto recipe (and some foolproof tips on mastering this famously tricky dish), plus we sit down for a cuppa and a chat with Jack van Praag, Cambridge’s favourite ice creamman. Turn to page 68 to read about our visit to his temple of frozen delights to discover how he created Jack’s Gelato, a true gem in Cambridge’s culinary crown. We also take a tour of The Grafton Centre’s flourishing Food Social, an exciting new food court for the city that shuns the usual bleak shopping centre chains in favour of interesting indie traders. Dr Sue Bailey whizzes off on another foodie flight of fancy, too, this time taking a look around a stunning new Fitz exhibition that looks at food in all its forms, serving up a feast for the senses with a European feasting table, a Georgian confectioner’s workshop and a Jacobean banquet. Find out more on page 78. Like it or loathe it, November also signals the start of the Christmas build-up here in Cambridge, with the arrival of the ice rink on Parker’s Piece, the lights switch on and a whole load of Christmassy markets across the region, all of which we’ve got news on. If you fancy giving the festivities a swerve until at least a little closer to 25 December (I really don’t blame you), there’s also Bonfire Night to enjoy (page 6), a

FIND US @CAMBSEDITION

CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

bumper line-up of gigs and club nights (page 45), the always-lovely Literary Festival (page 26) and a huge, city-wide jazz showcase (page 32). Enjoy the issue and see you next month! Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Laura Bryant and Lucy Woolcomb , designers at Bright Publishing

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

3

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

6 ● STARTERS Top things to do and see in the city, plus our favourite social media pics 11 ● ARTS & CULTURE Exhibitions, concerts and theatre highlights to enjoy in November 21 ● ART INSIDER Ruthie Collins, founder of Cambridge Art Salon, shares her arty picks of the month 22 ● MUSEUM SPOTLIGHT We pay a visit to a Cambridge gem: the Museum of Classical Archaeology 26 ● LITERARY FESTIVAL Meet your favourite author or your new favourite book at this popular event 28 ● BOOK CLUB Up this month, Stanley and Elsie by Nicola Upson, plus other great reads on our bookshelf 32 ● ALL THAT JAZZ We find out what’s in store at this month’s Cambridge International Jazz Festival 35 ● CRAFTY CHRISTMAS Blitz your Christmas list at one of these lovely local craft fairs 41 ● COMPETITION We’ve teamed up with the Grand Arcade to give away a Nespresso Vertuo Plus!

43 ● GET YOUR SKATES ON The North Pole Cambridge, aka our city’s open- air ice rink and Christmas market, is back! 45 ● AFTER HOURS Comedy, gigs, festivals and more nightlife fun this month 53 ● LISTINGS Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this November 56 ● COMMUNITY HUB Community events, charity news and more from your local hub 61 ● FOOD NEWS The latest gastro goings on and happenings around Cambridgeshire 68 ● THE INSIDE SCOOP We meet the man behind Cambridge’s legendary ice cream parlour, Jack’s Gelato 75 ● CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer on what’s cooking in his kitchen this month 76 ● RECIPE A fragrant saffron risotto to warm your cockles this winter

78 ● CAMBS ON A PLATE The history of the juicy relationship between Cambridge and pineapples! 82 ● REVIEW A Sunday lunch to remember at Saffron Walden’s Eight Bells 85 ● WINTER DINING GUIDE Fantastic feasts and where to find them this winter 95 ● BEAUTY Daisy Dickinson rounds up the beauty products on her radar this month 96 ● INDIE OF THE MONTH We shine a spotlight on Re:Fresh, the Mill Road salon that’s changing the face of hairdressing 99 ● FASHION We round up the best blazers on the high street, from sequin dazzlers to chic workwear 101 ● EDUCATION Advice on choosing the right sixth form, plus a look at the benefits of learning outdoors 115 ● HOME EDITION Tips and inspiration for your home and garden this month

5

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

STARTERS

@PRETTYLITTLECAMBRIDGE_

@TRADITIONAL_PUNTING_COMPANY @DAVID_VALINSKY_PHOTOGRAPHY

OUR FAVOURI TE CAMBRIDGE INSTAGRAM PICS OF THE MONTH. HASHTAG # INSTACAMB FOR A CHANCE TO FEATURE !

FOLLOW @CAMBSEDITION ON INSTAGRAM FOR MORE GREAT PICS OF CAMBRIDGE

MILLER HARRIS OPENS

Perfumer Miller Harris has taken a fragrant first UK step outside of London (it’s in Hong Kong too), with its new store in Cambridge’s Rose Crescent. Taking botanicals as its muse, the store is home to a wide range of products, including fragrances such as Violet Ida, Blousy and Brighton Rock, which are part of its colour collection. Whether it’s head notes, heart notes or lasting impressions, there’s everything on the fragrance pyramid you could wish for. Iconic singer and actress Jane Birkin’s L’Air de Rien is a unique and nostalgic fragrance, with chic sensuality, and you’ll find things for the home in the store too, with a range of reed diffusers, room sprays and scented candles to choose from, plus hand and body wash, and hand and body lotion. For something to wear, there’s a range of scarf wraps, inspired by the Japanese art of Furoshiki – it’s an eco-friendly way to wrap gifts too. All Miller Harris products are vegan and free from phthalates, artificial colourants and formaldehydes. millerharris.com

6

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

STARTERS

Guaranteed to go off with a bang, one of the biggest free events in town – courtesy of the city council – is Bonfire Night on Midsummer Common. The fireworks are at 7pm on 5 November, with a huge selection of food stalls open from 6pm, so there’s no need to dash home from work first to grab a bite. Each year the sky is transformed into a breathtaking kaleidoscope of colour, with a sonic crackle and pop to match. The bonfire will be lit after the firework display, and for further thrillseekers, there’s the fairground too, which like the food stalls, runs till 10pm. cambridgelive.org.uk BOOM TIME!

DUXFORD LODGE OPENS

The start of this month marks the opening of The Lodge, a new boutique hotel in Duxford with 17 stunning bedrooms. The owners fell in love with the building, located on Ickleton Road, and have spent the last year lovingly restoring it to its former glory – and then some. As well as the luxurious bedrooms, The Lodge boasts a stylish co-working space plus a meeting room with all mod cons. You’re even welcome to bring your pooch to the co-working space during the day and for an overnight stay in the hotel rooms, so your furry friend needn’t get left at home. There’s food, too, courtesy of basement cafe Graze, which is open to the public every day and serves up tasty sharing plates and plenty of veggie and vegan options. In the evenings, sample Scoff – a more intimate restaurant whose menu showcases the best of seasonal and local produce, as well as offering cocktails and local spirits and beers. thelodgeduxford.com

7

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

THEATRE • ART EXHI B I T IONS • CONCERTS • BOOK CLUB

IMAGE Saxophonist Jess Gillam, who performs in Cambridge as part of the Boldfield Orchestral Series (page 13)

9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

ARTS & CULTURE

Susie Salmon is just like any other girl. She adores her charm bracelet and has a crush on a boy – there’s just one big difference: she’s dead. Alice Sebold’s bestselling coming-of-age novel The Lovely Bones comes to Cambridge Arts Theatre from 4 to 9 November, in a powerful adaptation about life after loss. Featuring a cast of 13 and creative staging, the play promises to be an exciting, emotional and uplifting tour de force. Tickets start from £20 and the play is suitable for ages 14 and up. cambridgeartstheatre.com LOVELY BONES

11

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

ARTS & CULTURE

Expect a showcase of the ornate and beautiful thanks to the members of Anglian Potters throwing some shapes in Cambridge this month. The group’s membership come together for an exhibition at All Saints’ Church from 9 November to 8 December, featuring outstanding ceramics including tableware, decorative items, wall art, jewellery, sculpture and handcrafted Christmas gifts, decorations and cards. More than 70 local ceramists are involved, including organiser and exhibitor Ian Vance, who explains: “With a vast range of styles at affordable prices, the exhibition, now celebrating its 21st year at this magnificent Arts and Crafts church, attracts a loyal following as well as welcoming many new visitors every year. The exhibition is staffed by potters, so someone is always on hand to chat with visitors and to explain the inspiration, process and techniques behind their work.” Entry to the exhibition is free and, with such a wide range of creative work on display, there’s something for every taste and budget. Be sure to browse the Christmas tree, resplendent with handmade ceramic ornaments for sale, which have been made and donated by the exhibitors, with all the proceeds from the sale of decorations going to Magpas Air Ambulance. anglianpotters.org.uk ANGLIAN POTTERS CHRISTMAS EXHIBITION

BEHIND THE LENS

At Every Picture Tells a Story , hear the stories behind the kinds of images you may see on the news. Voluntary Service Overseas has been fighting poverty for more than 60 years, and some Michaelhouse Centre, Trinity Street, at 6.30pm on 7 November. Their work helps to improve health, education and livelihoods in some of the world’s poorest communities. The free event accompanies an ongoing exhibition running at the venue until 9 November. of the organisation’s volunteers are talking about their work at

12

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

ARTS & CULTURE

BOLDFIELD ORCHESTRAL SERIES

Return . On 30 November, meanwhile, legendary conductor Vladimir Ashkenazy returns to the Corn Exchange with a programme of pieces by Grieg and Brahms. The series continues in the new year, with a visit from saxophonist Jess Gillam, a young performer generating a buzz for putting her instrument back in the classical spotlight. She brings an eclectic programme of Marcello, Glazunov, Mozart and Haydn to the venue on the 31 January. On 7 Feb, the series celebrates its anniversary with a gala concert featuring Nicola Benedetti alongside the acclaimed City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra performing a spectacular programme of Bartók and Berlioz. Running through until 24 May 2020, there are plenty more musical treats in store on the programme, from Beethoven to Brahms – visit the Cambridge Live website for the full line-up and booking details. cambridgelive.org.uk

Celebrating 30 years of bringing sublime orchestral performances to the Corn Exchange, Cambridge’s classical concerts series has returned. The timing is perfect, since by all accounts classical music is enjoying a surge in popularity – especially among younger listeners. Earlier this year, streaming giant Deezer reported a 270% rise in the number of subscribers to its most popular classical music playlist, with 43% of those new listeners falling into the ‘millennial’ age bracket. To encourage local younger people with an interest in classical music to come along to a Boldfield Orchestral Series concert, a special concert ticket price of £5 is available for students and people aged under 26. Among the shows they can seek out, the Philharmonia Orchestra visits on 1 November for a performance that includes the sweeping, eerie beauty of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake Suite , and Sibelius’ Finnish folktales with Lemminkäinen’s

13

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

ARTS & CULTURE

SIR RANULPH FIENNES : LIVING DANGEROUSLY

The Guinness Book of Records ’ ‘greatest living explorer’ returns to Cambridge Corn Exchange on 21 November for tales of endurance that will amaze. Sir Ranulph Fiennes has been on some of the most ambitious private expeditions and is the first person to reach both poles, the first to cross the Antarctic and Arctic oceans, as well as the first to circumnavigate the world on its polar axis. Both light-hearted and poignant, his story covers his early years to the present day. His current Global Reach Challenge is an attempt to cross both polar ice caps and climb the highest mountain on each of the seven continents. Tickets from £28. cambridgelive.org.uk

A two-day festival of contemporary and vintage IN PICTURE & PRINT

illustration at The Guildhall on 16 and 17 November, Cambridge Illustration and Print Fair features more than 70 exhibitors. If you’re a fan of linocuts, screen-prints, risographs and handmade books, cards and zines, there will be plenty to get excited about, with established illustrators alongside emerging talent from Cambridge School of Art starting out on their careers in illustration and design. As well as contemporary illustration, specialist dealers will have original 20th-century artwork to browse, too. It’s £2 to get in and doors open at 11am.

Making Tracks has been bringing exciting music from all corners of the globe to venues around the UK since 2010. Showcasing unique musical traditions, sparking new collaborations and contributing towards a global community of socially and environmentally engaged musicians, the group currently includes an Estonian bagpiper, an Orcadian fiddler and a Kenyan nyatiti player. On 5 November, at Cambridge Junction, they present a series of solo and collaborative performances from each of the project’s eight 2019 Fellows. The concert is part of the Junction’s Pay What You Feel scheme, with tickets starting at just £2.50. junction.co.uk MAKING TRACKS

15

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

ARTS & CULTURE

Saffron Hall’s season of Thoughts & Talks, which has so far featured broadcaster John Humphreys and soprano Lesley Garrett, continues this month with wisdom from Benjamin Zephaniah. One of the best-loved British poets of the past 50 years, he’s almost certainly the most anti-establishment, too, having turned down an OBE for its connotations of colonial brutality and slavery. He’s also been a driving force in campaigns against the police and other bodies, helping to expose corruption and wrongdoing, including working with the family of Stephen Lawrence. His bestselling autobiography, released last year, offers both a trip down memory lane and a political history, highlighting his friendship with Nelson Mandela, his personal battles with racism in the UK and his vocal support for the least well-off in our society. “They say that you mellow with age,” says Benjamin. “But if anything, I’m getting angrier and angrier. There is so much injustice in the world and there are so many things wrong in society that there would be something wrong with me if I was willing to just sit back.” Benjamin’s book, The Life and Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah , is being accompanied by a major tour, his first in eight years. He’s taking to the road in autumn 2019 to talk about some of the stories he tells and to reconnect with an engaged fan base that supports equality and veganism, among other issues. “I’ve been on the road with my band in the past year and we’ve played some great shows. But it’s been a long time since I’ve done any one-man shows. I did a tour when the hardback was out last year and this follows publication of the paperback. So, yes, I’m looking forward to getting on the road again. It’s always quite daunting. But I enjoy meeting people when I’m on the road and BENJAMIN ZEPHANIAH AT SAFFRON HALL

there’s so much to talk about this time around.” See him speak at Saffron Hall on 9 November, with tickets starting at £10. saffronhall.com

PRISM

Robert Lindsay stars in the powerful, poignant true story of Jack Cardiff, the go-to cinematographer in cinema’s golden age. Prism comes to the Arts Theatre from 18 to 23 November, following a sold- out run at London’s Hampstead Theatre. His days of work and play on film sets long behind him, along with his liaisons with famous women, Jack surrounds himself with memorabilia from his lifetime’s work, and sits down to pen his autobiography. It should be easy, but he would rather live in the past than remember it, due to the onset of Alzheimer’s. His wife Nicola (Tara Fitzgerald), his carer and his son at times morph into the stars he used to work with. Tickets start at £25. cambridgeartstheatre.com

16

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

ARTS & CULTURE

CAMBRIDGE MUSIC FESTIVAL

A boutique music event attracting some of the classical genre’s brightest stars, Cambridge Music Festival returns this month with a dazzling line-up of talent. The first date for your diary is 6 November, when the majestic King’s College Chapel will host a performance by its own world-class choir, singing Handel’s coronation anthems. First performed in 1727 for King George II and Queen Caroline’s crowning, these pieces were an instant hit; the most famous being Zadok the Priest , which has been performed at every British coronation since (not to mention serving as the inspiration behind the UEFA Champions’ League football anthem!). Another performance not to miss is that of cellist Natalie Clein at the beautiful Trinity College Chapel on the 12th, playing a collection of masterworks from the first world war period, which includes pieces by Debussy, the Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodály and the English composer Rebecca Clarke. Clarke lived at a time when women composers were still frowned on by society, and Natalie is particularly excited about bringing the little-known cello version of her virtuosic, tender Viola Sonata to wider attention. “It has moments of longing and seems to be calling out to large landscapes and large skies,” she says. “I like to imagine that Clarke was thinking of America, which at that time perhaps seemed a place of greater possibility and freedom.” While Natalie modestly regards herself as a mere conduit for these composers’ work, her performances are the result of exactly this sort of personal engagement, and she has a reputation for intense, passionate recitals. “When you rehearse a piece, you live with it, and it lives with you,” she muses. “The longer that happens, the more it evolves and expands as a vision… There is no such thing as a perfect performance, ever. But there are moments where you think: ‘Yes, I hit some kind of a truth there, it felt honest.’ They are few and far between, but striving for them is the pain and the glory of what performers do.” Elsewhere on the programme, catch the Britten Sinfonia at Ely Cathedral (9 November), spellbinding piano and multimedia works inspired by internet culture at the Mumford (13 November), and Joshua Bell playing Mendelssohn at West Road Concert Hall (14th). Visit the website for the full programme. cambridgemusicfestival.co.uk

Winter Lights returns to Anglesey Abbey for its ninth year with a new route, exciting new live music partners and, in another first, film screenings, too. Perfect for family, friends and foodies, the illuminated 1.5-mile route features lots of effects round every corner, as you go through the winter garden, silver birch grove, past Lode Mill and along the riverside path, as well as Anglesey Abbey itself. Spread across three long weekends, 29 November to 1 December, 5 to 8 December, and 12 to 15 December, this year’s live music is hosted by Cambridge Folk Festival and Cambridge International Jazz Festival. Hot food and drinks will be available in the Orchard and the Redwoods Restaurant, while Cambridge Film Trust has created projections to make the most of the darkness, plus film screenings, too. Adult tickets are £16.50, children £11.15 and under 5s go free. nationaltrust.org.uk WINTER LIGHTS

17

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

ARTS & CULTURE

REMBRANDT EXHIBITION

An exhibition featuring a specific focus of Rembrandt is at The FitzwilliamMuseum, displaying etchings that were at the time attacked as ‘intolerable’ and ‘monstrous’ by critics because they veered away from the classical norms of beauty. Rembrandt and the Nude features studies of female nudes from the 1630s and two decades later. He depicted his models naturalistically, in informal poses, concentrating on sensuousness rather than the idealised body. His treatment was fiercely attacked until the mid-20th century and this exhibition challenges that view, so make up your own mind and go see. The exhibition is underway and continues till 23 February. fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

WREATH-MAKING EXPERIENCES

Enjoy a morning of Christmassy creativity with a gorgeous decoration to take home at the end. Amelia Cornish’s wreath-making workshops are taking place at the Packhorse Inn, Moulton, on 10 December and the Rupert Brooke, Grantchester, on the 13th. All materials and a festive two-course lunch are included. Priced at £75 per person. thepackhorseinn.com/christmas-2019

AI DEBATE AT CAMBRIDGE UNION

We are living in the age of intelligent machines, with AI permeating ever more aspects of our day-to-day lives. But is this technology as benign as many of us assume it to be, as we happily share our secrets with Siri and upload our selfies to FaceApp? Is it possible that AI will bring more harm than good? That’s the matter up for discussion on 21 November, in a debate being held in partnership with IBM Research. Participants include champion debater Harish Natarajan, law and ethics professor Sylvie Delacroix, and Neil Lawrence, the DeepMind professor of Machine Learning at the University of Cambridge and the co-host of Talking Machines . Project Debator, an AI system that can debate humans on complex topics, will also be in attendance, going toe-to-toe with human debaters using crowdsourced arguments. The event is open to the public and more details are available via the Cambridge Union Facebook page

19

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

ARTS & CULTURE

RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH

in collaboration with the renowned poet José María Muñoz Quirós, is key to the show. A limited edition of just 15 copies, these are 12 poems as paintings, selected by the artist from more than a thousand of the poet’s works. “The relationship with the poet was established in our home town,” explains Albano. “We are both from Ávila and we are both interested in memory and in the traces of history as a source of inspiration.” Theirs is an enchanting dialogue between painting and poetry, taking us on a journey of “flight between the rigour of the word and the richness of plastic creativity…” At the heart of many cultures, of course, is food. Opening at The Fitzwilliam Museum is Feast & Fast , exploring food in all its glory, dating from 1500s to 1800s. This multisensory exhibition shares treasures from the collections at the museum and includes four reconstructions with food at each centre, from a Jacobean sugar banquet to a Georgian confectioner’s workshop. You can pop in for a curator’s talk, learn about Christmas food traditions, enjoy a bit of festive shopping and jazz in the courtyard, plus there’s the chance to watch a screening of Bright Star , a romantic film about John Keats. Finally, those near Mill Road, make sure you see Angels Need Love Too at the Makers Gallery, a solo show of new works by Manuela Hübner, from 7 to 16 November. Large-scale oils, full of light, love and elegant contrasts explore self- determination – that path of figuring out exactly who you are. What gives us inner freedom? Or takes it away? What

but completing all the stories within the covers, a feeling or intuition will help you interpret the meaning,” says Karin. A dark simplicity fuses her work, colouring it with both innocence and a timeless quality that make this show a perfect prelude to cosying up next to a roaring fire, with nothing but stories to see you through the night. The Keeper of Stories runs until 20 November. Why do we need storytellers? What is the relationship between myth, magic and the telling of stories? “As all parents know, the way you tell a story to a five- year-old is different than the way you tell it to an adolescent – but make no mistake, the teenager desperately needs to hear that story, as does an old woman,” says mythologist and shaman, Martin Shaw. “It’s a cloak around the shifting kingdom of their roaming soul.” The Storyteller and the Shaman is a morning workshop from Cambridge Storytellers with Martin at Storeys Field Centre on 11 November, with a performance in the evening, too; book tickets via WeGotTickets. Also seeing a blurring of boundaries between art and the written word is Voyage , from Spanish artist Albarno Hernandez, at the Centre for Languages and Inter-Communication (CLIC) throughout the academic year. Cambridge has long fostered a crossover between words and art – a hotbed for culture and communication – making the CLIC the perfect setting for Voyage . The book Claro vuelo de la memoria , an artwork created

s the nights draw in, this is the time of year when the landscape takes on its own eerie beauty – nature coming to life through myth, magic and folk tales. Yet according to the National Trust, folk tales are becoming an endangered species, as they’re at risk of losing their relevance to modern-day children. The Keeper of Stories , at Espresso Library, is a solo show from Swedish artist Karin Eklund that is peppered with the same haunting, ethereal magic that permeates folk tales – an intuitive space that allows us to explore some of humanity’s greatest fears. “My work blurs the definitions of art and illustration. Each work could be seen as part of a collection of short stories, or individually. Just as when one story in a collection might not give you all the answers, or even a sense of space,

“Timely food for thought in the run-up to the most frantic time of the year”

makes us who we really are? Timely food for thought, in the run-up to the most frantic time of the year – enjoy it.

21

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

MUSEUM OF CL ASS ICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Classically BEAUTIFUL IT MIGHT BE TRICKY TO FIND, BUT A TRIP TO CAMBRIDGE’S MUSEUM OF CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY IS WELL WORTH THE EFFORT, AS RUTHIE COLLINS DISCOVERS

Archaeology, is a chronological tour of 1000 years of art history at your feet. “It’s amazing to think that the original sculptures differ from the casts by just one millimetre. Yes, marble is difficult to replicate, but here, you can see how sculpture has changed over time, in one room, which is really special,” says Susanne. Go hunting for casts of famous sculptures, such as the painted Peplos Kore, or the first ever full-sized female nude statue, sculpted in the fourth century BC, of Aphrodite – a favourite of classicist Mary Beard. On show until 13 December is a fantastic exhibition, Goddesses , from New Zealand contemporary artist Marian Maguire. “It is a real pleasure to host work by Marian Maguire again. Not only are her lithographs beautiful – and this series, Goddesses , is really no exception to that rule – but there is a playfulness and nuance to her retellings of ancient myth, which is just a joy. And yet, there’s also a fierceness to the eye she casts on the past: her goddesses, reassessing their place in the world and empowered to change themselves and what they see around them, feel especially timely,” says Susanne. The show is a collection of five eye-catching etchings that explore how ancient Olympian goddesses may respond to modern life – from climate change and #metoo to war. What would they do, if they could do things differently? “We create gods in our own image. They reflect us: sometimes at our best, sometimes at

love my babies,” curator Dr Susanne Turner beams, when discussing the Museum of Classical Archaeology’s collection

of plaster casts of classical sculpture, over 450 of which are on display to the public. “The word curator comes from Latin, ‘curor’ – to care; and part of my job is creating relationships between objects and people,” she explains. “I love how the public can come into the museum, see me, speak to me... it’s unusual for a museum curator to be so available.” Tucked away above the Faculty of Classics on Sidgwick Avenue, MOCA is the smallest of the nine University of Cambridge Museums, and is a space that can sometimes be missed. “You deserve a gold medal for finding us,” laughs Susanne, who has been working at the Museum since 2013, but also worked as an invigilator at the site while studying for her PhD at the Faculty of Classics. It’s a small team, whose forward- thinking programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks, school visits, tours and workshops has helped attract 15,000 visitors a year, and the museum prides itself on making this largest surviving collection of Greek and Roman plaster casts accessible to visitors. “We try to give a warm welcome, we’re relaxed and really care about our visitors’ needs. It’s all about finding those points of connection, about storytelling.” Original classical sculpture is not always easy to visit – but here, walking around the Museum of Classical

ABOVE AND RIGHT The museum houses a collection of 450 casts of classical sculptures BELOW Marian Maguire’s etching of Hera

“You can see how sculpture has changed over time”

22

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

MUSEUM OF CL ASS ICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

our worst. I want the goddesses to see they live in a different world. I want them to adapt, change, be useful again,” says Marian Maguire herself. With the support of Arts Council England, MOCA and its exhibitions programme make a welcome platform for contemporary art in Cambridge. Earlier this summer, artist Loukas Morley hosted The Silence of Time , attracting acclaim for his stunning, playful contrasting of his modern art with figural classicism. “On paper, perhaps it shouldn’t have worked – but that it did is testament not only to Loukas’ own sensitivity to our context, but also to the ways in which temporary exhibitions bring to life our collection,” says Susanne. “It’s important to us to partner with artists, both local and from further afield, to show that ours continues to be a living, breathing collection.” The next exhibition planned is Panathenaia ,

23

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

MUSEUM OF CL ASS ICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

“The museum is family friendly, too”

with artist Debbie Loftus, who was Artist in Residence at the British Museum in 2018. The show will feature the works resulting from her residency, inspired by the Parthenon frieze. The museum is family friendly, too. Children, in particular, will love counting the number of naked bums on display – higher than any other museum (167 to be precise, as calculated by @museumbums on Twitter). “I’m proud of that figure! When school trips come, one of my pet hates is children being told to be quiet and serious. I love it when they go wild and enjoy themselves here,” says Susanne. Children are also invited to take part in Make your myth, a writing and art competition for seven to 13 year olds, inviting them to write a story of up to 500 words, or create an art piece inspired by the goddess Athena. The closing date is 20 December and you can enter via the museum’s website.

2020 looks set to be another packed year for the museum, with events planned for the Science Festival in February; the very popular Drink and Draw will be back in May, plus Summer at the Museums. “The world is changing a lot, visitors have high expectations. I love the intellectual side of what I do, but nothing beats meeting the public and learning more about what they need,” says Susanne. With this attention to people and their curiosity, we imagine the museum’s appeal will only grow in 2020.

This fresh approach to public engagement with the collection is part of the museum’s appeal. You can also book on to a series of Bridging Binaries LBTQ+ tours, on Saturdays. “Volunteer-led, the content was written by Dan Vo, who runs similar tours at the V&A,” explains Susanne. “We are really proud to be a part of this project, and provide a space for our volunteer guides to spotlight non- normative gender and sexual identities through a range of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer-related objects.”

25

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

L I TERARY F EST I VAL

ringing writers and readers together to share stories, ideas and a love of words, the Cambridge Literary Festival returns for its

BOOKISH CAMBRIDGE

winter instalment from 29 November to 1 December. Established in 2003, the event takes place at venues around the city including West Road Concert Hall and the Old Divinity School. It offers a busy line-up of talks and discussions that, according to festival director, Cathy Moore, “help us make sense of the times we are living through, and distract us from them”. Spanning politics, religion, science, food and climate change, the programme boasts a roster of top writers and thinkers. The fiction line-up is as strong as ever, with some of the world’s biggest authors stopping by to discuss their latest novels. Ian McEwan – national treasure, Booker prize winner, and author of classics Atonement and The Innocent – is at the festival with his latest offering, Machines Like Me . Imagining an alt-history world where Britain lost the Falklands War and breakthroughs in AI have produced ‘manufactured humans’, the story shows McEwan at his subversive best. You can also catch Jung Chang, author of global literary sensation Wild Swans , discussing Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister , an exploration of the stories of three different and extraordinary women, plus Turkish writer and activist Elif Shafak is in conversation with Erica Wagner. Elif Shafak also hosts a discussion with Will Eaves, whose award-winning book, Murmur , takes inspiration from Alan Turing’s life in the aftermath of his conviction for homosexual acts. According to The Times , this dreamlike read “opens

AS CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL RETURNS FOR ITS WINTER INSTALMENT, WE FIND OUT WHAT’S IN STORE

WORDS BY NICOLA FOLEY

26

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

L I TERARY F EST I VAL

your mind to a very different kind of novel, one that dares to forge a generous dialogue between arts and sciences, one that celebrates the wonder of human consciousness”. Bestselling author David Reynolds, meanwhile, is offering his treatise on the Brexit saga, suggesting that it represents a crisis of national identity that has been a long time in the making, while journalist John Crace brings his humorous touch to the topic, in a talk designed to act as “your personal survival guide to the ongoing political apocalypse”. From politics to religion, or lack thereof, Richard Dawkins makes his festival debut with his recently released book Outgrowing God . One of the world’s leading science communicators, Dawkins was 15 when he stopped believing in God, and this latest work sees him examining the profound questions that human beings must confront as they grapple with the meaning of life and what to believe. Do we need God to explain the existence of the universe? How do we decide what is good? Join the debate at what’s sure to be a provocative and exhilarating event. There are more than a few famous faces on the bill for the festival this year, too, including ballet star Dame Darcey Bussell. Having recently released her latest book, Evolved , she’ll be casting her eye back across her illustrious career in dance, from becoming the youngest principle dancer at the Royal Ballet to a stint as a Strictly judge. Comedian Jenny Eclair will be taking to the stage as well, serving a liberal helping of both laughter and

IMAGES Opposite page: Elif Shafak and her book, 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in this Strange World. Clockwise from top left: Cressida Cowell, and her new book from the Wizards of Once series; Darcey Bussell and her autobiography, Evolved: Ian McEwan and his latest novel, Machines Like Me

bestowed on novelists including Ali Smith and Eimear McBride. Rewarding ‘fiction at its most novel’ the prize was co-founded by Goldsmiths University and the New Statesman in 2013, with the shortlist offering a showcase of some of the year’s most exciting new fiction. The winner will be in discussion with Anna Leszkiewicz, New Statesman culture editor and Goldsmiths Prize judge, considering the art of the novel. There’s plenty more on the programme besides, from a hymn to the redemptive power of nature with Richard Mabey to a guide to preserving our humanity in an uncertain age with Paul Mason. Whether you’re in the mood for heated political debate, the inside scoop from your favourite author or some old-fashioned literary escapism, there’s plenty to tempt. “Come mingle with like-minded folk,” encourages Cathy Moore. “Share ideas, laughter and collective joy, and to be inspired by our roll call of uplifting writers and performers.”

poignancy as she discusses her novel Inheritance , an examination of tragedy and turmoil across generations. Celebrity chef Raymond Blanc is in town for the festival as well, in conversation with Fitzbillies owner Tim Hayward. Join them for a discussion about Blanc’s life and work, plus his new book The Lost Orchard , a beautifully illustrated love letter to the trees surrounding his restaurant. There’s also a chance to meet the newly crowned winner of the prestigious Goldsmiths Prize, an accolade previously

“Join the debate at what is sure to be an exhilarating event”

27

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

BOOK CLUB

CAMBRIDGE EDI T ION

BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS STANLEY AND ELSIE BY NICOLA UPSON f the name Stanley Spencer doesn’t immediately flood your mind with intensely lavish, almost claustrophobically busy people- packed paintings, then a quick internet search is in order or – better yet – a stroll to The Fitzwilliam Museum, where a collection of Spencer’s paintings can be seen in Gallery One. It was one such visit to the Fitzwilliam that first inspired local author Nicola Upson to embark upon writing this month’s read, Stanley and Elsie , which tells the tale of the relationship between Stanley Spencer and Elsie Munday, his small family’s housekeeper. “I’ve always loved Spencer’s work. I remember having a postcard of his ‘The Resurrection, Cookham’ as quite a young girl,” Nicola explains, “and although obviously then I didn’t understand all the different levels to it, the painting has always fascinated me. Being at college in Cambridge, with that wonderful collection of his paintings at the Fitzwilliam on my doorstep, meant I’ve kept in touch with his work over the years – but it was particularly an exhibition that they put on about ten years ago called Sargent, Sickert & Spencer .” The exhibition included a small pencil sketch by Spencer of a young woman in a maid’s uniform who “seemed to be flirting, at the front door, with either a postman or a delivery man,” Nicola recalls. “As well as being a prolific painter, Spencer wrote thousands and thousands and thousands of words – all now all in the Tate’s archives – but what was selected to go with that picture was the fact that the woman was called Elsie Munday, and that she was a maid who Spencer hired when they moved to Burghclere with his family.”

“As well as being a prolific painter, Spencer wrote thousands of words, all now in the Tate’s archives”

28

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

WHAT WE’RE READING ELISHA YOUNG, JUNIOR SUB EDITOR, REVIEWS THE TESTAMENTS BY MARGARET ATWOOD This sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale was one of the most hotly anticipated literary releases of 2019, and was joint winner of this year’s Booker Prize (alongside Bernardine Evaristo’s Girl, Woman, Other ). While the first book is an introspective novel, told from the first-person point of view of Offred, I feel this follow-up has breadth rather than depth. Fans of Aunt Lydia will enjoy finding out more about her back story, while the book’s other two protagonists offer intriguing insights into details of the Gilead regime.

Spencer relocated to the quiet Hampshire village in 1926 to continue his work on what would become the Sandham Memorial Chapel – now a National Trust property, which can still be visited – originally built to commemorate Lieutenant Henry Willoughby Sandham, who died at the end of the first world war. Henry was the brother of Mary Behrend, one half of the couple who commissioned the creation of the chapel. The book begins as Elsie joins the household – Stanley, his artist wife Hilda and Shirin, their very young daughter – and documents the shifting relationships and hidden motivations of the trio of adults. “Stanley wrote that when [he and Elsie] were living together at Burghclere, their life was ‘as light as the air’ – and that they ‘blew about like two rooks’ in the cottage… he spoke of her with such fondness and affection that it seemed to show a completely different side to Stanley Spencer – who obviously is not known for his sensitive relationships with women,” Nicola adds. “The friendship between [him and Elsie] and the uniqueness of that relationship – I think there’s something

Stanley Spencer himself, there was very little to go on when searching out the detail of Elsie’s life. “There are a huge number of sketches and drawings of her, as well as the paintings that he and Hilda did - and there’s a paragraph in a book published in the 1970s, which contained reminiscences by Spencer’s friends and associates – and Elsie contributed a paragraph on how much she enjoyed looking after the family – typical, discreet, servant stuff. “But I was also able to track down Elsie’s son, Gordon, and we had a very old-fashioned and lovely correspondence – I sent him lots of questions, and he would handwrite the answers and send them back. He told me lots of detail about his mother as a mother and as a person, all of which has gone into the book – but she didn’t tell them until after they were grown up that she’d even worked for the Spencers – so there certainly wasn’t much in the way of testimony to go on. But in a way, that’s what makes the book: she can be a rich, partly fictional character, as well as including the truthful elements that we do know from history.”

fascinating in writing about a friendship because a lot of people, when they hear the book’s title, think there’s going to be some sort of romantic involvement or affair, and there wasn’t – it was a genuine friendship based on a mutual understanding.” Though the book is clearly meticulously researched, drawing on the vast reams of documents created by

I would start at the Cambridge Arts Theatre: I worked there for ten years and it’s close to my heart. There’s something special in its beginnings in the 1930s – the period that most of my books are set in – and the fact that Keynes built it as a stage for Lydia Lopokova, his wife, to dance and act on is a wonderfully romantic story, and you can still feel that in the fabric of the building. My partner Mandy and I love the Orchard Tearooms in Grantchester and I’ve also drunk an awful lot of coffee in the University Library’s tea room. NICOLA’S CAMBRIDGE

29

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

BOOK CLUB

LOOK OUT FOR THE CAMBRIDGE EDITION BOOK CLUB STICKERS IN HEFFERS AND GET MONEY OFF OUR MONTHLY PICK HEFFERS IS LOCATED AT 20 TRINITY STREET, CAMBRIDGE BLACKWELLS.CO.UK

Also recently published is A MuseumMiscellany , written by Harston-based author Claire Cock- Starkey to celebrate the intriguing and fascinating world of museums (the Fitzwilliam is one of the many museums featured) by collecting together a “cornucopia of museum- related facts, statistics and lists – covering everything frommuseum ghosts, minerals that can only be found in museum drawers, dangerous museum objects, the most popular exhibitions, and cabinets of curiosity to the Museum of London’s fatberg.” One for museum lovers, and perfectly sized for stockings... ON THE BOOKSHELF

“For me, the most important research – whether it’s crime or not – is the sense of place”

Nicola does have a track record of adopting this approach – she is also the author of a very successful series of crime fiction books where real-life Scottish author Josephine Tay appears as the central heroine and detective. “That series started out as a biography but eventually the gaps were just as intriguing as the facts,” she says. “And her life had a lot of gaps in it. It is that blankness – not to make them completely fictional, obviously – but yes, she can be her own person.” Researching these books is a task Nicola hugely enjoys. “I love it – it’s always the best bit. And what was particularly brilliant about this was that I spent a long time looking at Stanley Spencer paintings,” she says. “But for me, the most important research – whether it’s crime or not – is the sense of place. To go to Burghclere for the first time, to walk into that chapel

– I’ve never quite forgotten that. It’s an incredible experience. Even when I went back after the book was published, it was as shocking and moving as it was the first time. Going to the places and immersing yourself in that atmosphere is, for me, the single most important piece of research.” In November Nicola will be appearing at the Fitzwilliam as part of the Cambridge Literary Festival, talking about her work close to the spot where she first encountered the pencil drawing that inspired the book. “The relationship between Stanley and Patricia [his second wife] and Patricia and Dorothy is central to the second half of the book, and I did a lot of making notes, standing in front of that particular double nude that they have in the Fitzwilliam – so to go back and talk about it in front of those paintings will be very special indeed.”

30

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

J AZZ F EST I VAL

Ja zz Fusio n LOOK FORWARD TO A PACKED SCHEDULE OF PERFORMANCES, WORKSHOPS, TALKS AND MUCH MORE AT THE CAMBRIDGE JAZZ FESTIVAL

WORDS BY CYRUS PUNDOLE

he innovative Cambridge International Jazz Festival returns

in November for two weeks of cool tunes, exciting beats, swinging sounds and the blues. Featuring many heavyweights from the UK and beyond, it’s a celebration of the best on the musical culture scene, from modern jazz to acid jazz, spread across 28 venues, mostly close to the heart of the city. With more than 70 gigs from 13 to 24 November, featuring 500 musicians, every audience member will have their own favourites. Bound to be a big draw are pioneers of the funk and soul mash- up that became acid jazz, The Brand New Heavies. Their early albums in the 90s were hits on both sides of the Atlantic and they have featured vocalists N’dea Davenport, Siedah Garrett and Carleen Anderson down the years. They play Cambridge Junction on 14 November. Roslin Russell, the festival’s director, said: “As ever, our aim is to offer audiences something that will change their ideas about jazz and exactly what genre of music it is. In doing this, we hope to attract people who may never have thought of attending a jazz performance, because they think it’s not for them. “One of the greatest things about jazz is that it appeals to everyone of all ages, and from all walks of life. It’s an incredible, genre-bending musical experience.” Among the wide range of choices to tempt you are the Black Voices Quintet, who present The Soul of Nina Simone on 24 November at Storey’s Field Centre. The group are known for their arrangements of traditional African, Caribbean and English folk songs, jazz, gospel, pop and reggae. Saxophonist Jan Garbarek – known for his work in classical and world music spheres, too – plays Saffron Hall on the 16th, while Norwegian compatriot Marius Neset takes his sax to the Mumford Theatre on the 23rd.

Yazz Ahmed returns to the festival with her 13-piece ensemble at the Junction’s J2 on 19 November, with her psychedelic Arabic jazz promising to be a big draw. Cambridge’s own Brass Funkeys are also back, with their pumping brass-driven funk at a toe-tapping Storey’s Field Centre gig on 24 November. The godfather of British blues, John Mayall has featured numerous greats in his band the Bluesbreakers, including Eric Clapton, Peter Green, Mick Fleetwood, John McVie and Mick Taylor in the 60s. He plays the Corn Exchange on 17 November. Also with roots in the 60s, Soft Machine bring jazz, rock and folk to their gig at Storey’s Field Centre on 14 November. One of the country’s finest new funk and soul singers, Ashton Jones is at the Junction with his group The Ashton Jones Project on 13 November, together with the Renegade Brass Band.

IMAGES (Clockwise from top) Liran Donin (23 Nov), Binker Golding (9 Nov), Gwilym Simcock (15 Nov) and Yazz Ahmed (19 Nov) are performing at the Cambridge Jazz Festival

32

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136

www.cambsedition.co.uk

Powered by