Cambridge Edition February 2020

YOU R MON T H L Y F I X OF LOCA L L I F E

F E B R UA R Y 2 0 2 0

TOP VALENTINE’S NIGHTS OUT IN CAMBRIDGE, THE LATEST FOOD NEWS, THEATRE HIGHLIGHTS, ART EXHIBITIONS & LOTS MORE

EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Editorial assistant Frances McNaughton 01223 499469 francesmcnaughton@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editor Felicity Evans Junior sub editor Elisha Young ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Ad sales manager Ed Grundy 01223 499463 lucymcnally@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Phoebe Fielder 01223 499454 phoebefielder@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Sue Bailey, Ruthie Collins, Daisy Dickinson, Siobhan Godwood, Charlotte Griffiths, Charlotte Phillips, Cyrus Pundole, Alex Rushmer, Anna Taylor, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Jordan Worland DESIGN & PRODUCTION Designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong edgrundy@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Lucy McNally 01223 492248

n extra day this February (thanks, leap year!), means you’ve got even more time to get out and about and enjoy the city this month. And the good news is that after a grindingly slow January, the city’s events calendar is finally hotting up again as we inch towards spring. A new season on its way means

a new programme of shows at Cambridge Arts Theatre, and with a star-studded selection of top-flight touring productions headed our way, from spine-tingling thrillers to stunning operas to world-class comedies, there’s lots to look forwards to, as we find out on page 19. Also, don’t miss Twilight at the Museums, which sees the city’s top museums open their doors after hours for a chance to see the collections in a whole new light, plus interactive theatre, sensory experiences, illuminations and more. Get the lowdown on page 25. If hibernating with a great read is more your current mood, pick up a copy of Cambridge author Menna van Praag’s new book, The Sisters Grimm . A feminist fairytale for the modern age set mostly in Cambridge, there’s plenty to delight in this spellbinding novel, not least the gorgeous, lyrical descriptions of the city’s familiar sights. Find out more in our Book Club on page 28. Food-wise, we’ve got news on the next Eat Cambridge festival, a luxurious winter recipe to try and a review of Scott’s All Day, a pizzeria and brunch spot that the Mill Road community has quickly taken to its heart. Have a read from page 49. You’ll also notice that this issue includes the inaugural Eating Out in Cambridgeshire guide, a brand-new supplement

manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

FIND US @CAMBSEDITION

CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

that offers a showcase of some of the area’s best eateries, from casual cafes to Michelin-starred restaurants. Enjoy the issue and see you next month! Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Lucy Woolcomb , designer at Bright Publishing

3

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

8 ● STARTERS Not-to-be-missed events, plus our favourite social media pics of the city 13 ● ARTS & CULTURE New-season theatre, art exhibitions and more for culture vultures this month 21 ● FIVE MINUTES WITH... Joe McFadden, Strictly star and now stage star, on his new show, Priscilla, Queen of the Desert 23 ● ART INSIDER Ruthie Collins, founder of Cambridge Art Salon, shares her arty picks of the month 25 ● TWILIGHT AT MUSEUMS Torchlit adventures, fossils and fun await at the city’s museums this month 26 ● MAKING HISTORY Edition explores the Museum of Cambridge, discovering tales of our city’s rich heritage 28 ● BOOK CLUB Local author Menna van Praag’s book The Sisters Grimm is this month’s featured read 33 ● AFTER HOURS The best comedy, gigs and more nightlife fun this month 39 ● COMPETITION Win a luxurious afternoon tea and spa day at the Cambridge Belfry hotel

43 ● LISTINGS Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this month 49 ● FOOD NEWS The latest gastro happenings, featuring food festivals, new openings and more 52 ● REVIEW We check out Scott’s All Day, Mill Road’s popular new pizzeria and brunch spot 55 ● CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer looks at the tricky business of capturing food on film 56 ● RECIPE Alex creates a soul-warming beef bourguignon to warm your cockles this February 58 ● CAMBS ON A PLATE Our latest epicurean adventure takes us from Churchill’s breakfasts to The Locker Cafe 60 ● VALENTINE’S IDEAS Inspiration for wooing your SO, from romantic meals to punting trips

63 ● JEWEL IN THE CROWN We meet Harriet Kelsall, author and jewellery shop owner 68 ● INDIE OF THE MONTH The team at Dulcedo, creators of spectacular sweet treats, share their story 71 ● WEDDINGS Planning your big day? Check out our guide to the region’s top suppliers 81 ● BEAUTY Daisy Dickinson rounds up the beauty products on her radar this month 82 ● COMMUNITY HUB Community news, events and more from your local hub 85 ● EDUCATION Local schools share how they’re harnessing the power of social media 97 ● HOME EDITION Tips and inspiration for your home and garden this month

5

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

STARTERS

@GIANLUCABRUNO3

@CAMBRIDGEBENGALI

@DOUGWALLACEPHOTO

OUR FAVOURI TE CAMBRIDGE INSTAGRAM PICS OF THE MONTH. HASHTAG # INSTACAMB FOR A CHANCE TO FEATURE !

FOLLOW @CAMBSEDITION ON INSTAGRAM FOR MORE GREAT PICS OF CAMBRIDGE

Back to bring the very best affordable arts activities into towns and villages across Cambridgeshire, The Library Presents is offering a brand-new season of events this spring. Starting on 22 February, the tailor-made programme features performances and workshops specially chosen by local people. Cambridgeshire County Council’s chair of communities and partnership committee, Steve Criswell, said: “We are passionate about showcasing high-quality arts in an affordable way, using more than 75% of our Cambridgeshire library network and further highlighting the many different ways that the spaces can be used to explore and broaden our minds. Make sure you grab your tickets soon!” With music, theatre and comedy shows, as well as circus acts and arts and crafts activities, the spring season of events caters to all ages and interests. Highlights include British folk duo Ninebarrow, book-themed comedy night The Improvised Book Club and award-winning production Common Lore by Stute Theatre. There is also a creative writing workshop with author and published poet Michael Brown to celebrate LGBT History Month this February. Tickets for the events can be booked online or purchased in participating libraries. The Library Presents’ spring season brochure is THE LIBRARY PRESENTS LOOK OUT FOR…

available to download now. cambridgeshire.gov.uk/arts

8

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

STARTERS

CAMBRIDGE DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL

Now in its 16th year, the date is set for the annual Cambridge Dragon Boat Festival. On 12 September, more than 40 crews representing companies from across Cambridgeshire will race each other over the 200m course on the River Cam at Fen Ditton. The event raises funds for the Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust (ACT), the only charity dedicated to ensuring that patients at Addenbrooke’s and the Rosie hospitals receive the highest quality of care possible. Director of festival events, Carol Lester, said: “This action- filled event is an unmissable opportunity for team building, whether you’re welcoming new employees or thanking your team and key clients. Taking part gives your company a unique opportunity to challenge your peers on the water and build relationships while supporting a great charity. We expect places to be in high demand, so recommend teams get their entries in early.” The team that raises the most money for ACT wins a champagne punting tour, courtesy of Scudamore’s, along with the charity trophy. dragonboatfestivals.co.uk/Cambridge

The box office is now open for this spring’s Cambridge Literary Festival, taking place from 16 to 19 April. Aiming to promote literature, language and the arts in the local area in order to advance education and benefit the public, it always attracts a sparkling line-up of big names, from politicians to comedians. The next festival has the climate crisis at its heart, asking: can the arts reach people in a way that politics so far has not? Guests including Caroline Lucas MP, author Dieter Helm and seminal thinker Ann Pettifor will discuss the subject, while Hadley Freeman, Robert Webb, David Lammy, Marian Keyes and Jacqueline Wilson will also be stopping by. General sale opens on 7 February. cambridgelive.org.uk LITERARY FESTIVAL NOW BOOKING

9

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

MUSEUMS • MUS ICALS • THEATRE • BOOK CLUB

IMAGE At the Arts Theatre this month, the Richard Alston Dance Company celebrates 25 years of performing

11

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

ARTS & CULTURE

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

most inspiring journeys and spectacular cinematography from the world’s best adventure filmmakers. The event also features a free prize draw to win outdoorsy goodies from the festival’s tour partners. The Banff Mountain Film Festival is screening at Cambridge Corn Exchange, with the Red Programme of films showing on 17 March and the Blue Programme showing on 21 April, both at 7.30pm. Details of each programme can be found on the Banff Mountain Film Festival’s website, banff-uk.com. Tickets start from £16.75. cambridgelive.org.uk

“As well as exhilarating stories starring intrepid characters and pioneering journeys, an evening at Banff is a celebration of the great outdoors, with a vibrant atmosphere and a real sense of community. And we guarantee audiences will leave inspired to have an adventure of their own,” says UK and Ireland tour director, Nell Teasdale. “We can’t wait to share the latest inspirational films from the world’s most prestigious mountain film festival on our biggest tour yet!” The tour features two collections of short films, the Blue Programme and the Red Programme, showcasing some of the

Touring from now until 26 May, Banff Mountain Film Festival is back to bring you more extraordinary action and adventure films from all over the globe. The 2020 tour is set to be the most extensive yet, with 113 screenings across the UK and Ireland. Held at the start of November in Banff, Canada, since 1975, the event is one of the largest and most prestigious mountain film festivals in the world. It receives hundreds of entries into its competition every year, with the best of these being shown at the festival, and a further selection being chosen for the world tour.

13

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

ARTS & CULTURE

FEBRUARY HALF TERM AT IWM DUXFORD

If you’re looking for family activities over the February half-term, some special events are being held at IWM, Duxford. There’s Flight Academy on 17 and 19 February, where you can dress up as a pilot and take on reflex challenges, and on 18 February try Aeroplane Investigators, a hands-on introduction to specialist aircraft equipment. Family Mission: D-Day Edition, from 15 to 23 February, will reveal facts about the biggest invasion in history, while interactive family game Cockpit Control on 21 February shows how engineering and maths helped improve flight safety. You can even hear real-life experiences from those who witnessed conflict first hand at We Were There: Meet Veterans and Eyewitnesses on 20 February. General admission, events included, from £17.10. iwm.org.uk

LINES OF SITE

The Museum of Classical Archaeology is currently showing a selection of highly contemporary works by artist Debbie Loftus which explore the resonance of the Parthenon frieze’s innumerable missing pieces. Around 80% of the original frieze has survived to this day, but it is its fractures and absences that interest Loftus and inform her romantic creations in this exhibition, Lines of Site . The display is open from 28 January until 28 March and admission is free. classics.cam.ac.uk

Cambridge Footlights is bringing together all of its talent to present Footlights Spring Revue 2020: Crossed Wires , which promises yet more sketches and silliness from the comedy troupe. There are performances from 18 to 22 February at 7.45pm, as well as an additional 2.30pm matinee performance on 22 February. Tickets start at £10. adctheatre.com FOOTLIGHTS SPRING REVUE 2020 : CROSSED WIRES

14

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

ARTS & CULTURE

BYARD ART IN 2020 Art Fair. Aiming to make art fun, accessible and, of course, affordable, the fairs present a selection of art from some of Byard’s best-loved artists. You can find thousands of original prints, paintings and sculptures by many talented artists. Byard Art is offering complimentary tickets to all of its friends, so don’t hesitate to get in touch if you’d like to be added to the guest list for either of these events. The fairs are running from 11 to 15 March in Battersea and from 25 to 29 March in New York.

by Helen Ward and original feltwork by Waller Hewitt. 20x20 in 2020 runs from 30 April until 31 May. Over the course of the rest of the year, there will be plenty of exhibitions of new works by artists such as the ever-popular Antoine Josse, Beckie Reed, and talented landscape painter Garry Raymond Pereira. There’s also the annual summer exhibition starting in July, which features an ever-changing display of Byard’s favourite contemporary artists. If you’re tempted to buy something, the gallery offers a bespoke framing service, so any pieces you purchase can be framed on-site. It can also frame any artworks or memorabilia you may have hidden away in your home, so now is the time to bring out any long-neglected pieces from your cupboards. If you’re only just starting your art collection, you can take advantage of the Own Art scheme, which allows you to spread the cost of your purchase with an interest-free loan. You can add yourself to Byard’s email mailing list via the website. byardart.co.uk

Byard Art has an exciting line-up of exhibitions coming in 2020. Its inaugural Exhibition of Prints – in partnership with London’s TAG Fine Arts – opens on 30 January and runs until 23 February, showcasing an exciting collection of artists and printmakers who create limited-edition prints. A versatile medium, print has been adapted by many of the artists in the exhibition to include hand-finished aspects of collage, foiling, paints and watercolour. The artworks will include pieces by portrait artist Maria Rivans, as well as embellished cityscapes by acclaimed British illustrator Laura Jordan. At the end of February, the World of Interiors show opens, featuring artists who use home environments and special buildings as inspiration. The likes of Alison Pullen and Relton Marine take this traditional subject and push the boundaries of interiors, putting their own spin on the theme with unique, hand-painted collage, bright oils and multilayered still-life pieces. World of Interiors is open from 27 February until 29 March. If you happen to be in London or New York in March, you can catch Byard Art at an Affordable

Garden Delights follows in April, offering an exhibition brimming with floral creations and celebrating all that is good in our gardens. Perfect for the spring, it will feature new works by gallery favourites Fletcher Prentice and Jack Frame. You can catch Garden Delights from 2 to 26 April. To celebrate 2020, Byard Art has asked some of its artists to make 20x20in artworks. The 20x20 in 2020 exhibition is a great opportunity to experience smaller creations by artists who tend to paint and create large-scale artworks, and there will be a wide variety of pieces on display. Among these will be some tiny butterflies

15

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

ARTS & CULTURE

AHBAB FESTIVAL

For the fifth consecutive year, the Ahbab Festival is returning to Cambridge, celebrating Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) culture through music and film. Running from 7 to 16 February, the festival offers a range of entertainment and events across the city, including films, family activities and delicious food from Bedouin restaurant. Throughout the festival there will be performances at the Junction by some of the most celebrated musicians from the MENA region. Performing on 7 February is prolific Syrian musician Omar Souleyman. This will be Souleyman’s second time performing at Cambridge Junction, following his appearance at the Ahbab Festival three years ago. Making his Ahbab Festival debut, Omar Bashir is performing on 14 February. He has followed in the footsteps of his father – oud player and composer Munir Bashir – to become a prominent solo artist in both classical and contemporary Arabic music. Guido Minisky and Hervé Carvalho – Parisian DJ duo Acid Arab – bring their well-honed style to the stage on 15 February, and closing the festival on 16 February is award-winning musician Maya Youssef – the acclaimed artist who opened the very first Ahbab Festival in 2016. junction.co.uk

It’s your last chance to catch Rembrandt and the Nude , an exhibition at the FitzwilliamMuseum showcasing the beauty and power of Rembrandt’s then-controversial treatment of the female form. His naturalistic style was initially slammed by the art world, as it challenged classical norms of beauty. The exhibition features etchings from two distinct periods in Rembrandt’s career, some from as early as the 1630s. Rembrandt and the Nude runs until 23 February; admission free. fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk REMBRANDT AND THE NUDE

THE ART OF THE LUTE

In partnership with the Academy of Ancient Music, acclaimed lutenist Thomas Dunford is set to deliver a performance to remember on 23 February at West Road Concert Hall. Directing and performing a programme featuring Bach, Buxtehude and Vivaldi, The Art of the Lute with Thomas Dunford will highlight the lute’s attributes as a solo instrument, as well as Dunford’s prodigious talents. Dubbed ‘the Eric Clapton of the lute’ by BBC Music Magazine following the release of his debut album in 2013, Dunford’s remarkable technique and captivating musicianship has brought him copious musical accolades, as well as collaborations with the likes of Nicola Benedetti and Trevor Pinnock, and with ensembles such as the Irish Baroque Orchestra and Akadêmia. Tickets from £16. cambridgelive.org.uk

16

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

ARTS & CULTURE

THE ENDELLION STRING QUARTET

In their 41st and final season, one of the finest string ensembles in the world – The Endellion String Quartet – is performing their ever-popular Beethoven Cycle at West Road Concert Hall. The Endellion has been Quartet in Residence at the University of Cambridge since 1991, performing regularly in the city. The quartet appeared at nearly all of the major series and festivals in Britain, including the Proms, as well as being featured on both radio and television. audiences since the quartet was formed more than 40 years ago, even winning them the Royal Philharmonic’s Society Award for Best Chamber Ensemble in 1996. The Endellion String Quartet’s next performance is on 26 February at 7.30pm at West Road Concert Hall. If you can’t make that, you can catch them on two more dates – 22 April and 20 May. Tickets start at £6. cambridgelivetickets.co.uk Their rich variety and eloquently expressive style have captivated

THE WAVES

Cambridge University Amateur Dramatic Club presents Virginia Woolf’s classic The Waves , adapted by Sarah Taylor. Promising to be evocative and emotional, the story follows six individuals whose lives interweave as they try to navigate their relationships to one another and the world around them. The Waves is showing at the ADC Theatre from 25 to 29 February.

Tickets from £9. adctheatre.com

18

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

ARTS & CULTURE

NEW SEASON AT CAMBRIDGE ARTS THEATRE

As always, a new year means new shows at Cambridge Arts Theatre, and with a host of outstanding touring productions, the star-studded new-season programme is sure to delight theatre lovers of all ages. From 3 to 8 February you can catch God of Carnage , one of the most successful plays ever performed in the West End. Starring Elizabeth McGovern, the story examines the antics of two 11-year-old boys – and the meeting between their parents that follows. Noël Coward’s Blithe Spirit runs from 10 to 15 February and stars comedy legend Jennifer Saunders, telling the story of Charles Condomine, whose life gets complicated when the ghost of his first wife is accidentally conjured by an outlandish clairvoyant. Featuring a star-studded cast, Band of Gold tells the story of a young mother drawn into life in the red-light district. An adaptation of Kay Mellor’s award-winning TV crime series, the play runs from 17 to 22 February. From 24 to 29 February, Stephen Mallatratt’s gripping stage adaptation of The Woman in Black brings Susan Hill’s acclaimed ghost story to life. Convinced that he has been cursed, a lawyer enlists a young actor to help him tell his terrifying story. As part of their final tour, Richard Alston Dance Company: Final Edition is the group’s celebration of the past 25 years, with an outstanding programme of work including Alston’s new choreographed piece, Shine On . You can catch it on 2 and 3 March. For kids, Room on the Broom – the Olivier Award-nominated stage adaptation of Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler’s best-selling picture book – tells the story of a witch and her cat who pick up some colourful hitchhikers. It’s running from 4 to 7 March. World-renowned student comedy troupe Cambridge Footlights will deliver yet more riotous comedy on 8 and 15 March and following this, haunting Scottish Highlands drama The Croft , starring Gwen Taylor, is showing from 11 to 14 March. Stephen Daldry’s multi award-winning production of J B Priestley’s classic thriller An Inspector Calls is on from 17 to 21 March, in which a dinner party is turned upside down by the arrival of Inspector Goole. Offering a dazzling insight into love, life and healing, the Olivier Award-winning production of Patrick Ness’ moving novel A Monster Calls is on from 24 to 28 March. Million Dollar Quartet ( 30 March - 4 April) brings the night of 4 December 1956 to life, when Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins came together for one of the greatest jam sessions of all time. From 6 to 11 April, murderous mystery The Cat and the Canary , starring Britt Ekland, tells the story of a group of heritage hunters who gather at a sinister manor, then it’s over to The Glee Club – the story of five hard-working, hard-drinking miners who enter their local singing gala – is showing from 14 to 18 April. Director Laura Attridge presents a fresh take on Così fan tutte – a combination of glorious music and farcical comedy – from 28 April until 1 May. Also by the English Touring Opera, and on from 30 April until 2 May, Giulio Cesare , an adapted revival of Handel’s epic opera of passion and revenge, follows Julius Caesar’s conquest of Egypt. Closing the season from 8 to 13 June, Sasha Regan’s all-male H.M.S. Pinafore , the operatic comedy that tells a tale of love between the classes. cambridgeartstheatre.com

19

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

ARTS & CULTURE

minutes with… Joe McFadden

THE FORMER STRICTLY WINNER TELLS US ALL ABOUT HIS LATEST STAR TURN IN PRISCILLA, QUEEN OF THE DESERT, HITTING CAMBRIDGE CORN EXCHANGE THIS MONTH

WHAT CAN AUDIENCES EXPECT FROM PRISCILLA?

It’s quite surprising as a musical because there’s a real story there, there’s a real heart to it and it’s genuinely about something important. It’s about three misfits being drawn together and going on a journey, finding things out about themselves. As well as there being great songs and fantastic dancing, I think people are going to be – and they are being – moved by it. The reaction we’re getting every night is fantastic and people are saying that as well as being uplifting and joyful and toe-tapping, it makes them think and see other people’s points of view. And even though these characters might be very different to themselves, they can relate to the struggles and the journey that they all go through. WHICH MUSICAL NUMBER DO YOU ENJOY THE MOST? It changes. There are so many amazing songs in there. We Belong is a really lovely moment – it’s right at the end of the show when the three drag queens all come together, and it’s the end of their journey. True Colours is another lovely moment; we encounter some real danger and homophobia when we’re on the road and that’s another moment of the three of us coming together and helping each other through some dark times. ARE THE COSTUMES IN THE SHOW AS IMPRESSIVE AS THE ONES IN THE FILM? They absolutely are. The real challenge that the designers had facing them when they took the job on was that the costumes from the film are iconic. Everyone remembers them, the flip-flop dress and the bus... and even in the West End the design was amazing. It was a high bar for them to meet and I think they absolutely have done that. People rave about the costumes and they’re every bit as vibrant

and eye-catching as the ones that have gone before.

and – touch wood – it feels OK now. It’s like everything else: the more you do it the easier it gets. I still don’t understand why women do it, but I appreciate the effort that it takes all of a sudden! WHAT’S BEEN YOUR FAVOURITE VENUE SO FAR? It’s so difficult to say... I did love playing Cambridge when I was there doing The House on Cold Hill early last year, it was amazing. It was great to have an excuse to go to Cambridge; it was a shame that I’d never been there before. That’s a real highlight of touring, getting to visit places like Cambridge, Oxford, Malvern and Shrewsbury – all of these really fantastic, historic and beautiful places that I haven’t experienced before. Priscilla, Queen of the Desert is showing from 10 to 15 February at Cambridge Corn Exchange. cambridgelive.org.uk

DID YOU FIND THE AUSTRALIAN ACCENT DIFFICULT TO GET TO GRIPS WITH? It’s been fine; we had a really great accent coach and I try to immerse myself in the culture as much as I can. I’ve been watching loads of Kath & Kim and Dame Edna Everage and other Australian stuff over the months. It’s quite a fun one to do and it doesn’t feel too difficult! That certainly was a challenge all in itself. Even staying upright in the beginning and just putting them on in front of people for the first time was quite nerve-wracking, thinking I was going to fall over! But as the weeks of rehearsals went on it got easier HOW ARE YOU FINDING DANCING IN HEELS?

21

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

ARTS & CULTURE

RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH

she writes. Perfect for snapping up at this time of year, which starts with Imbolc on 1 February; traditionally the festival of Brigidh, patron saint of poets. Mother’s Day is also around the corner, and this reads like a love letter of sorts to daughters and to motherhood itself. “For, to conceive a being who can bear and birth life herself needs a little something… extra. Every daughter is born of an element, infused with its own particular powers.” A novel full of fallen stars, thieves and possible murderers, a reminder that without the darkness, there can be no light. So that’s settled then. In dark times let’s hear it for love and optimism. Enjoy Cambridge Queer Valentines at Cambridge Junction on 13 February, in aid of the Kite Trust. A night of acrobats, comedy and contemporary dance – this sounds brilliant. Or watch out for arts charity Rowan’s next exhibition at Chesterton Community College. After the success of their first charity art exhibition in February 2019, over 120 canvases have been created by artists keen to get involved with Rowan, which supports adults with learning disabilities. The event shows a range of artists from all backgrounds, working across many media on 120 16x12in canvases – an invitation for artists to celebrate their worlds – whether a person, place, occasion, hobby, love or passion. With the last show raising £5,000, this is a fabulous way to support Rowan – a Cambridge-based arts centre and charity where artists and craftspeople work with people with learning disabilities. They provide a safe, creative and unique environment where students thrive and grow artistically and in confidence and self-esteem. Visit rowanhumberstone. co.uk for more information, or support the exhibition to help create a better world, on 8 and 9 February.

balanced, but they need to be resolved. That’s the best way to go through life, a bit like a builder would do, but with abstract language rather than bricks and mortar.” Bright bold colour fills Espresso Library, singing with the joy of fresh renewal. “That constant change, trying to balance things. Resolve things. Making those priority decisions, harmonising and balancing the abstract – is what I am reflecting,” Steve says. Visual slices of optimism, perhaps reflective of Steve’s rejection of the echo chamber, a boombox, it seems, of modern-day life’s ‘series of crescendos’. “I don’t understand why I am so unusual in rejecting it all,” he says, genuinely mystified. “I need solitude to make art.” Go visit – you’ll forget about Armageddon. Another welcome, magical treat for your diaries is a talk with Menna van Praag at Waterstones on 5 February. She’ll be discussing her new book The Sisters Grimm , a feminist retelling of fairy tales. Part of a rising literary trend that also gave us Madeline Miller’s Circe ; this space where magic and ancient myth meets feminism and fiction is exactly what we need in a world dominated by warring patriarchs. Menna’s writing has long sung with a touch of the ethereal, taking us off to a Cambridge that is full of magic, but with The Sisters Grimm you can feel poetry, too, pushing through the prose – a fresh edge to her work, emboldened, perhaps by its sparkling, feminist undertones. As “The Sisters Grimm are daughters of air – at least they begin that way – born of dreams and prayer, faith and imagination, bright- white wishing and black-edged desire,”

t’s February, a month of renewal – and love, apparently. Hard to remember these things, when we are reminded, every nanosecond it seems, of an impending apocalypse. Even if you are canny enough to avoid social media, you’ll still be subject to streams of interruptions. Exploring these themes is the show It’s

Here Somewhere . “In the middle of trying to figure out what to say to you about this, I could hear my mum asking me about insurance. It’s modern-day life,” laughs artist Steve West as we talk about the show, which takes place at Espresso Library and runs until 20 February. “That change of concentration and situation is magnified with social media. I don’t subscribe to that, I try to minimise my own exposure to it,” he says. Luckily for us, Steve has been able to step away and is back making new art after a ten-year break, using the floor to work and using acrylic, spray paint and screen print to create his stunning abstracts; work that somehow transforms the complex nature of life today into pieces that invite synergy, edge and originality. A visual sound clash of harmony meeting chaos. “I like the finished pieces to have some sort of rhythm, to be in some sort of balance, yet with a narrative running through – to keep the eye moving,” Steve says. “My paintings are possibly too

“February is a month of renewal – and love, apparently”

23

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

TWI L IGHT AT THE MUSEUMS

Twilig h t at t h e M useums CAMBRIDGE’S MUSEUMS ARE ALWAYS EXCELLENT, BUT BECOME EVEN MORE EXCITING UNDER COVER OF DARKNESS!

WORDS BY FRANCES MCNAUGHTON

There are additional activities at the Polar Museum on Lensfield Road, as well as more events at venues further afield. The Cromwell Museum, Chatteris Museum, The Norris Museum, Wisbech & Fenland Museum and the National Heritage Centre for Horseracing and Sporting Art are all offering events for you and your family to enjoy. Susan Miller, University of Cambridge Museums Events administrator, says: “Twilight is one of our most popular family events and it’s easy to see why! It’s an evening that brings the whole city to life and the atmosphere is always brilliant. The event offers a great opportunity to explore our museums in a fun, out- of-the-ordinary context. This year, we would love to encourage families to seek out somewhere new – we have some real treasures to discover. We are proud to offer such a rich variety of activities for free.” Twilight at the Museums is set to be a fun-filled evening of after-hours exploration. You can download a copy of the what’s on leaflet from the University of Cambridge Museums’ website. museums.cam.ac.uk/twilight

Museum has a fantastic collection of fossils. As if that wasn’t enough, there’s also an array of animals to discover at the Museum of Zoology. A selection of stories, interactive theatre and sensory activities will take you on a journey through light and dark at The Fitzwilliam Museum, or there’s the illuminated Glasshouses at Cambridge University Botanic Garden just down the road. There, you can find out more about the seriously strange side of plants. The Museum of Cambridge is hosting some spookily haunted happenings on Castle Street, with Kettle’s Yard offering clay-clad sensory fun in an especially themed trail just next door. Down the road you’ll find a UV torch trail at All Saints Church, or you could head to Great St Mary’s Church for an atmospheric twilight discovery. If you plan on wandering a bit further, how about ‘shining a light’ on the Cambridge Museum of Technology’s marvellous machines? There’s also a chance to learn about light’s mysterious qualities with some hands-on science at the Cambridge Science Centre.

n Wednesday 19 February, University of Cambridge Museums’ annual Twilight at the Museums is back. Fifteen

local museums open their doors after dark, welcoming explorers of all ages to wander the darkened galleries by torchlight. Offering free drop-in and bookable activities, along with outside entertainment and refreshments, there’s plenty for all the family to enjoy. Many of the venues are only a short walk apart, meaning that – between 4.30pm and 7.30pm – you can wander through whichever Twilight events take your fancy. At the Museum of Classical Archaeology, you can uncover The Secrets of the Statues, before heading down the road to the University Library to find out more about the world of trailblazing women. If you happen to be in the Downing Street area, there’s plenty for you to see; Whipple Museum of the History of Science has some illuminations and projections on show from sundown, the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology’s masks and headdresses are dazzling after dark and the Sedgwick

25

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

MUSEUM OF CAMBR I DGE

THIS CHARMING LOCAL MUSEUM IS THE PLACE TO BE FOR A SPOT OF REGIONAL REMINISCING, DISCOVERS FRANCES MCNAUGHTON

“We’ve had visitors come in and say they half expected to be served a pint when they sat down,” laughs Lesley Whittaker, active volunteer at the museum. “People really feel like they’ve been transported back into the past when they walk in. It’s lovely to see multiple generations experience the museum. The kitchen always seems to get a great reaction; some of our older visitors are reminded of their childhood or their grandmother’s house. There’s a real sense of nostalgia about it.” Among the assorted artefacts in the museum, there are stories of some remarkable local personalities. These

domestic dwelling, it has served several purposes in its long history, resulting in an eccentric layout that gives the museum a distinctively quirky character. “The museum is as much the building as what’s inside,” explains museum officer Jan Wheeler. “It’s a wonder that it’s still standing. We’ve got a bit of the wall exposed and on display so visitors can see the original pine timber frames.” The museum, the former White Horse Inn on Castle Street, is divided into nine atmospheric rooms, each displaying a selection of everyday objects from times gone by. The bar is particularly striking:

epresenting the history and heritage of Cambridge and Cambridgeshire over the past 400 years, the Museum of

Cambridge showcases an impressive collection of artefacts that shed light on to the customs and traditions of our ancestors. This small, independent museum is steeped in local heritage – the richness of which is well worth a visit. With its winding staircases and uneven floors, the 17th-century building’s eclectic history makes for some endearing interior design. Originally used by the townspeople of Cambridge as a

26

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

MUSEUM OF CAMBR I DGE

“People feel like they’ve been transported

back into the past”

include Elizabeth Woodcock, a farmer’s wife from Impington, who became trapped in deep snow for eight days, surviving on nothing but chestnuts and the brandy in her hip flask. “We have Elizabeth’s nutcrackers in the museum,” says Jan, “and even though she didn’t survive long after the snowdrift, her story is one of our favourites.” The guest room celebrates the many colourful characters who visited the pub over the years, ensuring they will be remembered for generations to come. The museum’s collections are characterised by the work of its longest- serving curator, folklorist Enid Porter. Enid spent the best part of three decades curating the collections at the museum, gathering objects that have provided us with unique insight into the past. “Enid was amazing,” says Lesley, “she basically collected most of what we have in the museum today on her own, as well as running the place – she even lived on- site!” The museum’s Enid Porter Room pays homage to the integral role she played in the museum’s curation, celebrating her legacy and the countless stories and memories she recorded. By continuing to collect stories of change and development in Cambridge, the museum hopes to revive her ethos and ideas in order to preserve local heritage for future generations. One project doing just that is Capturing Cambridge, a local initiative working in partnership with the museum to piece together the mosaic that makes

IMAGES The Museum of Cambridge not only contains various artefacts, but stories of local personalities

pass, so you can come back as many times as you like. Children aged 12 and under are free when accompanied by an adult, or are otherwise eligible for a lower concessionary fee. Now well on the way to its 90th birthday, the Museum of Cambridge continues to provide visitors with a sense of place and identity. Being independent, the museum survives on funds raised through admission charges, shop sales and fundraising – along with a few charitable donations – and receives no core funding. Many of its staff members are volunteers. “Currently we have around 70 or 80 volunteers, but we’re always encouraging more people to join us,” says Jan. If you’d like to get involved with volunteering, you can visit museumofcambridge.org.uk

up Cambridge’s intricate social heritage. Featuring stories from as far afield as North Yorkshire and Kent, the project aims to put local history on the map in and around Cambridge. You can have a look through some local stories and even contribute some of your own on the website: capturingcambridge.org With the future of Cambridge folklore in mind, the museum is keen to get the younger generation interested in local heritage, offering plenty of events in the school holidays. “We’re planning lots of activities in the February half-term, so you can keep an eye out for those,” enthuses Lesley. “Our exhibitions are always changing, too. We don’t like to be stagnant.” Best of all, the £6 museum entry ticket doubles up as an annual

27

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

BOOK CLUB

CAMBRIDGE EDI T ION

BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS THE SISTERS GRIMM BY MENNA VAN PRAAG THIS NEW NOVEL FROM THE CAMBRIDGE-BASED AUTHOR IS A FANTASTICAL FAIRY TALE FOR THE MODERN FEMINIST AGE the tale of four sisters, their fates laid out before you even open the book in bold text on the beautifully-gilded cover: “Three will live. One will die.” Billed as a feminist fairytale for the modern age, this hugely imaginative and vast-in-scope story follows a quartet of women on the edge of 18 – Goldie, Bea, Liyana and Scarlet. They are half-sisters, all born on the same day to different mothers and who all possess forgotten magical abilities. As they struggle with the realities of regular day-to-day life – ageing relatives, minimum-wage work, parenthood, sexuality – they must also come to terms with their own identities, rediscover their inner abilities and ultimately do battle against their golden- eyed father, Wilhelm Grimm, who wants he Sisters Grimm is the latest novel and first in a new fantasy trilogy from Cambridge-based author Menna van Praag, which tells

while dreaming of her girlfriend, and Scarlet is taking part in a blacksmith’s experience day. Their individual tragedies and backstories unfold swiftly in short, bite-sized chapters, racing between the sisters’ different perspectives and two timelines in increasingly popular present tense. In Goldie’s chapters, her story is told in first person present, which further heightens the sense of intimacy and immediacy that’s signposted by the constant presence of the countdown. Early in the book Goldie meets the enigmatic Leo, a gifted student at Cambridge’s St John’s College – whose parallel identity is that of a lumen latros, an otherworldly Star Soldier who needs to vanquish the Grimm sisters in order to survive. Goldie soon develops a crush on this handsome young man, but Leo knows Goldie’s true identity as a Grimm even before she does: it turns out there are not just four Grimm sisters, and the Grimms and Star Soldiers have been at war for generations. It’s Leo’s task to make

his powerful daughters to join him on the dark side and inflict devastation on the world. The book opens 33 days before an as-yet-unspecified event, and we’re introduced to the four women in quick succession: Goldie is trying to make ends meet and fending off the unwanted advances of a co-worker; philosophy student Bea is relishing the experience of flying a glider across the Fens; Liyana is in her literal and figurative element, swimming in a hotel’s luxurious pool

“The whispers that speak of unknown things, the signs that point in unseen directions”

28

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

BOOK CLUB

LOOK OUT FOR THE CAMBRIDGE EDITION BOOK CLUB STICKERS IN HEFFERS AND GET MONEY OFF OUR MONTHLY PICK HEFFERS IS LOCATED AT 20 TRINITY STREET, CAMBRIDGE, BLACKWELLS.CO.UK

sure that this set of sisters don’t realise their powers. As with the majority of Menna’s other works, most of this book is set in Cambridge, which is an added treat for local readers: the fictional Fitzwilliam Hotel is the setting for the early sections of Goldie’s tale, and is inspired by the Hotel du Vin on Trumpington Street – the real hotel’s library is where a large proportion of the book was written. Other locations familiar to Cambridge residents make regular appearances: the first meeting of the four sisters occurs in Fitzbillies, while a thinly-disgused Agora At The Copper Kettle appears as No.33 Cafe, owned by Scarlet’s grandmother. The other key location is Everwhere, a fantasy land accessible only via the Grimms’ dreams and ancient gates – an architectural feature that Cambridge is rich in, thanks to its many colleges and historical buildings – and to which the sisters must return if they’re to fully realise their powers before the battle to come on their 18th birthdays. The theme of unleashing one’s concealed power runs through the marrow of this book: in the prologue the narrator speaks of their hope that by the time the reader finishes this tale, they’ll “start listening to the whispers that speak of unknown things, the signs that point in unseen directions and the nudges that suggest unimagined possibilities” – and discover their own inner magnificence. This is Menna’s first official foray into fantasy: her previous books, including her debut The House at the End of Hope Street and The Dress Shop of Dreams among others, contain elements of magical realism and are warmly loved by her many fans worldwide, selling 150,000 copies across the globe. This new book is also dedicated to anyone who is ever awake at 3:33am, and the nocturnal leanings extend to the author herself, who admits in a Facebook post that she wrote much of The

ABOVE The book’s beautiful cover offers readers a big clue as to how the story will unfold

From poetry to politics, fiction to finance, history to hip-hop and comedy to current affairs, Cambridge Literary Festival brings an eclectic mix of today’s best writers, thinkers and speakers to Cambridge all year round. The next festival takes place 16 to 19 April and booking is now open. cambridgeliteraryfestival.com CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL

Sisters Grimm during the night – crafting sentences after dark, she says, “gave a more enchanting and ethereal quality to the words…”. Menna’s writing is incredibly visual, and the UK edition of the book also features four specially commissioned illustrations by fellow Cambridge resident Alastair Meikle. The Sisters Grimm is one for fans of Menna’s distinctive and fast-paced writing style, and will also be popular with all those readers who are fans of fantasy tales and young adult fiction. Knowing there are two more books to come will no doubt delight readers keen to spend more time in the world of the Everwhere with the three remaining characters as they strike out to seek their sisters throughout the world – after all, now they’ve realised they are who they truly are, nothing can stand in their way…

29

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

NIGHT L I F E

THE NIGHTLIFE EVENTS NOT TO MISS THIS MONTH

GENTLEMAN’S DUB CLUB

BOYZLIFE

Festival favourites across the UK and Europe, Gentleman’s Dub Club are one of the most hard-working bands around. Seemingly forever on the road, when they opened the main stage at Boomtown nearly 100,000 people were watching, and they have been on the bill at all major UK festivals. With seven albums to their name and their unique take on dub music, they’ve become part of the fabric of the UK dub/ ska/reggae scene, championed by the likes of legendary DJ David Rodigan and his contemporaries at Radio 1 and 1xtra. The band have worked with Bitty McLean (who is on their most recent single), Fat Freddy’s Drop, Prince Fatty, Hollie Cook, Lady Chan, Horsemen and Shapeshifter, and have recently supported UB40. Catch them doing their thing at Cambridge Junction on 20 February, with tickets at £20.50. junction.co.uk

Combine two of the biggest boy bands in history and what do you get? Boyzlife! Westlife’s Brian McFadden and Boyzone’s Keith Duffy star together in this theatrical show at Cambridge Corn Exchange on 26 February, featuring all the classics you’d expect from their impressive, hit- filled back catalogue. Together the Irish groups had 18 No 1 UK singles and nine No 1 albums. You’ll hear No Matter What , World of Our Own , Mandy , Queen of My Heart , Picture of You , Flying Without Wings , Father and Son and many more faves. Tickets start at £32.50. cambridgelive.org.uk

33

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

NIGHT L I F E

NOW BOOKING RIVERDANCE 25TH ANNIVERSARY 27-29 MAR, CORN EX, FROM £40.50 Dance spectacular with four shows in three days. Tickets have sold well, so be quick! JOHN SHUTTLEWORTH’S BACK! 28 MAR, JUNCTION, £22.50 His back is giving him trouble. You’ll certainly hear about it. NEON MOON: GALACTICA 25 APRIL, JUNCTION, FROM £18 Venture into outer space for burlesque Barbarellas, twisted aliens and hunky spacemen. THE BOOMTOWN RATS 24 APRIL, CORN EX, £33 Bob Geldof-led group return, with big hits and new tracks.

Since John Peel opened the doors on Valentine’s Day in 1990, Cambridge Junction has established itself as a leading arts hub for the region. Thirty years on from its launch night, the venue is hosting a birthday party to celebrate the more than three million uniquely entertaining moments that audiences have experienced at the venue over the last three decades. The Junction is currently running a reminiscence project, Lost Night & Love Songs, pulling together oral and written histories and ephemera to commemorate the rich history of the venue and the impact it’s had on the lives of the people of Cambridge. If you have memories of events that you’d like to share, you can email the venue, join the Facebook group or go along to one of the memory cafe events; details are on the website. The bash on 14 February features DJs, bands and more, and tickets are priced at £19.90. junction.co.uk JUNCTION 30TH BIRTHDAY PARTY

Watch a video or old programme on YouTube or Vimeo and chances are you’ll start reading the comments underneath. It can be enriching, but more often downright annoying, as comments full of vile invective fill the screen. One person who’s taken a stand against internet trolls is David Baddiel. He hasn’t followed standard advice – to not get involved – as he sees them as akin to hecklers at a comedy show. So he answers them, tries to reason with them and the exchanges that follow, the strange, surreal online paths he’s led down, are the framework for his new show, Trolls: Not the Dolls : a comedy journey into culture’s most dank virtual underground. He’s at Cambridge Corn Exchange on 5 February, with tickets at £30. cambridgelive.org.uk DAVID BADDIEL

34

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116

cambsedition.co.uk

Powered by