DEFINITION September 2018

IBC’S ONES TOWATCH GET READY FOR THE BIG SHOW

September 2018 £4.99

TRANSFER MARKET SAMSUNG SHOCKS WITH NEW 2800MB/S SSD

FIRST TEST KINEFINITY

BIG SHAKERS MAVO POINTS TO LF FUTURE V a n it Fa ir BLACKkKLANSMAN DOP CHAYSE IRVIN INTERVIEW The contemporary drama from the 1800s

KIT REVIEWS | Q&A WITH HEAD OF KINEFINITY | THE CONFESSION TAPES DARK HEART | LARGE-FORMAT SHOOTING WITH LYREBIRD | YARDIE MOVIE

WELCOME

EDITORIAL Editor Julian Mitchell 01223 492246 julianmitchell@bright-publishing.com Editor In Chief Adam Duckworth Contributors Phil Rhodes , Zena Oliani, Madelyn Most, Adam Duckworth Senior Sub Editor Lisa Clatworthy Sub Editors Siobhan Godwood, BRIGHT PUBLISHING LTD, BRIGHT HOUSE, 82 HIGH STREET, SAWSTON, CAMBRIDGESHIRE CB22 3HJ UK mattsnow@bright-publishing.com Sales Manager Krishan Parmar 01223 499462 krishanparmar@bright-publishing.com Key Accounts Nicki Mills 01223 499457 nickimills@bright-publishing.com Sales Executive Ryan Hinchcliffe 01223 499461 ryanhinchcliffe@bright-publishing.com DESIGN Design Director Andy Jennings Design Manager Alan Gray Designer Lucy Woolcomb Ad Production Man-Wai Wong PUBLISHING Managing Directors Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck SOCIAL MEDIA Facebook @definitionmagazine Twitter @definitionmags Instagram @definitionmags MEDIA PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS OF Felicity Evans ADVERTISING Sales Director Matt Snow 01223 499453

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A s with a previous period drama production that we have covered in Definition called The Woman In White , the director and the DOP for Vanity Fair wanted to move away from the seemingly slow pace of the costume dramas that have littered the channels of terrestrial television for decades. For Vanity Fair it wasn’t the Dutch angles and extreme close-ups of The Woman In White but it was the pace and ‘realness’ of the dialogue (people actually talking across each other), it was the lighting of the anti-heroine Becky Sharp, it was the lens rotation in and out of every episode and it was the breaking of the fourth wall. DOP Ed Rutherford got his reference from the French new wave, the control of the zoom and of course that electric stare straight to camera from The 400 Blows movie, directed by FranÇois Truffaut. Vanity Fair 2018 is a feast of colour encouraged by RED cameras with helpful back filtering and refined in the DI from Technicolor. The Panavision Primo lenses complete the picture of a lively, funny, beautifully shot new drama for Sunday nights.

JULIAN MITCHELL EDITOR

Definition is published monthly by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Definition is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Definition that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. Prices quoted in sterling, euros and US dollars are street prices, without tax, where available or converted using the exchange rate on the day the magazine went to press.

DEF I N I T ION | SEPTEMBER 20 1 8 03

SE T- UP 06 After her role as The Queen, actress Claire Foy turns nasty as Lisbeth Salander. 08 Dr Jonathan Wardle of the NFTS claims that his film school creates industry leaders. 10 Jihua Zheng CEO of Chinese camera company Kinefinity states his intentions. 14 As the annual gear fest of IBC beckons we look at some companies you should visit. SHOOT STORY 40 How Fujinon lenses helped Timeline TV capture the joy of The Chelsea Flower Show. 50 As a true life crime doc this Netflix original used subtle shooting techniques. 56 A new ITV drama uses some new production gear to gain new perspectives. 62 Actor Idris Elba’s direction debut has DOP John Conroy calling the shots. FE ATURES 45 For our biggest issue of the year we look back at some production story highlights. 70 Spike Lee’s best movie in years had a hard message conveyed by DOP Chayse Irvin. 80 Large format is here and has to be understood, its first movie is Lyrebird . CONTENTS SE T- UP TITLE SEQUENCE Afte h r role as th Queen, actress Claire Foy turn nasty as Lisbeth Salander. I KNOW THIS MUCH Dr Jonath n Wardle of the NFTS claims that his film school creates industry leaders. FIVE MINUTES WITH CEO of hinese cam ra o p ny Kinefinity, Jihua Zheng states his i tentions. IBC ONES TO WATCH As the nnu l g ar fest of IBC beckons we lo k at some companies you should visit. SHOOT STORY 4K BROADCASTING BLOSSOMS How Fujinon lenses helped Timeline TV capture the joy of the Chelsea Flower Show. THE CONFESSION TAPES As a true l fe crime doc this Netfl x original u ed subtle shooting techniques. DARK HEART A new ITV drama uses some new production gear to gain new p rspectives. YARD LIFE Actor Idris Elba’s d rection debut has DOP J hn Conroy calling the shots. FE ATURES STORY ARCHIVE For our biggest issue of the y ar we loo back at some production story highlights. BLACKKKLANSMAN Spike Le ’s best movi in ye rs had a hard m ssage conve ed by DOP Chayse Irvin. LIVING WITH LARGE Large-format is here nd has to b understood; its first movie is Lyrebird .

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GE AR TESTS 84 Sincium quiat. Orem faccuscia autem. Dam, ut iducipsam id et et ut ut eum quas nova. 90 Sincium quiat. Orem faccuscia autem. Dam, ut iducipsam id et et ut ut eum quas nova. 91 Sincium quiat. Orem faccuscia autem. Dam, ut iducipsam id et et ut ut eum quas nova. 95 Sincium quiat. Orem faccuscia autem. Dam, ut iducipsam id et et ut ut eum quas nova. 96 Sincium quiat. Orem faccuscia autem. Dam, ut iducipsam id et et ut ut eum quas nova. 98 Sincium quiat. Orem faccuscia autem. Dam, ut iducipsam id et et ut ut eum quas nova. GE AR TE TS KINEFINITY MAVO The Kinefinity M vo i the company’ latest mod lar digital camera. SAMSUNG X5 SSD Sa s ng’s p vious SSDs wer fas enough but h r comes the 2800MB/s X5! IB/E RAPTOR LF LENSES These macro lenses have been designed for the large-format market and they’re beautiful. BLACKMAGIC EGPU Blackm gic Design ha te med up with Apple to prod ce his graphics powerhouse in a box. ROTA POL POLARISER This new polariser from Lindsey op ics is ideal for wide lens s and fits most pro matte boxes. 4K CAMERA LISTINGS Our famous ca era li ting now concentrates on 4K and above camera systems.

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ON THE COVER VANITY FAIR The classic Victorian social mobility story shot in a new wave style.

DEF I N I T ION | SEPTEMBER 20 1 8 05

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In a move that will surely shake up her image after portraying the Queen in Netflix’s The Crown , actress Claire Foy takes on something completely different in the form of punk hacker Lisbeth Salander. If you’ve read the Stieg Larsson books or seen the Swedish films or the Fincher remake, you’ll know the character. DOP Pedro Luque chose the ARRI Alexa 65 large-format camera system with ARRI’s new Prime DNA lenses. Pictured is Foy as the highly antisocial Lisbeth in The Girl in the Spider’s Web , while director and screenplay co-writer Fede Alvarez hides behind the Alexa 65 camera. QUEEN ON THE RUN

DEF I N I T ION | SEPTEMBER 20 1 8 07

SET- UP | I NTERV I EW

Dr Jonathan Wardle is director of the National Film and Television School and his vision includes making its students ready to be industry leaders I KNOW THIS MUCH... LEARNING ON THE JOB

I n a world where some would question whether study or experience is the best way to break into the filmmaking industry, the National Film and Television School (NFTS) claims to offer the best of both worlds, with a lineup of courses that are carefully geared towards delivering the skills and contacts that specific roles demand. Heading up the school is Dr Jonathan Wardle, whose previous experience includes establishing postgraduate partnerships with the BBC, Guardian and Sony Computer Entertainment Europe at Bournemouth University, and writing the Creative Skillset ‘Build Your Own MA’ framework. Made director of the NFTS last year, he’s responsible for developing a number of

new courses working in partnership with organisations including Sky, Channel 4, Discovery Networks International, the BBC and Aardman. We caught up with him to hear his take on the world of filmmaking and education. 1. WE TEACH WHAT OTHER SCHOOLS DON’T It was a huge privilege to get the job of director last year after working at the NFTS since 2012. When I first joined the School it had 240 students and taught a very core set of courses, but now we’ve got over 500 students and teach more behind-the- camera courses than any other film school in the world. We teach everything from assistant camera to production accounting

and script supervision, which are areas no other film school teaches. So the School changed and strengthened in that period by having that diversity of students. 2. YOU NEED TO FOCUS TO THRIVE We’re postgraduate, so that means, although it’s not a prerequisite, that most students have already done an undergraduate degree in a generalist area. What they come to us for is to build a portfolio and specialise in a particular area. The film and television industry is not a generalist discipline – you build a career and life in a particular area. And it’s only because of the specific nature of what we do and because people spend two years building a portfolio that within a few weeks of graduating they have the potential to get top jobs. For example, one of our 2017 composing graduates, Segun Akinola, has just been announced as the new composer for Dr Who , which I don’t think would have happened if he’d done a bit of sound, a bit of editing and a bit of composing. He got that

The... industry is not a generalist discipline – you build a career and life in a particular area

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I NTERV I EW | SET- UP

short courses and they are very practical.

6. YOU HAVE TO BUILD UP A TRACK RECORD The fact is that you’re never going to get given the gig of shooting a high-end TV drama or a feature unless you’ve done it before, so you have to build a portfolio and track record as a DOP, which is different to being an assistant in the camera department. You need a slate of work where you’ve made the choices. By coming to film school you get to do that, and a lot of our students come because they’ve tried to work their way up. They might have finished their undergraduate degree at 21 and worked for a couple of years in the industry, but they can’t seem to make that jump to the next level of their career; they come here and spend two years building a portfolio. 7. EXPANSION IS THE KEY TO SUCCESS My mission is to build on the national element of the school’s name and to do more in the nations and regions. We’ve already opened a base in Glasgow and are thinking about where else we might operate from. We are also considering the outreach work that we do, and what we might do to support people at a lower entry point as we do with the BFI Film Academy, which is aimed at 16 to 19-year-olds. All in all, it’s an exciting moment in time for the School.

job because he focused.

animations, fictions and documentaries. The teaching and the workshops wrap around that rather than workshops running separately. Every course has great exposure to the industry so, on screenwriting for example, they don’t do work experience but spend a lot of time with production companies interfacing with development people; on the ProductionManagement Diploma, students do month-long placements, so it depends on the discipline. 5. YOU CAN ALWAYS LEARN SOMETHING We’re probably the biggest provider of short courses for the film and television industry in the UK and have a reputation for being able to support people at an early or mid-career stage. The short courses are not for people who know nothing: they are for people who are already working but want to expand their skill set. For example, someone may have been working in development for some time but they want to understand production more so they go on a short course to expand their horizons. We work with about 700 people a year on

3. BE CLEAR IN WHAT YOU WANT TO ACHIEVE

We also run diplomas, which are typically a year long, in particular in areas such as production management, because there would be diminishing returns in areas like that if students were here for two years. A one-year Production Management diploma is just as valuable as a two-year MA in many ways because graduates are going to join at a junior level anyway, whereas with directing you’re using the second year to create a set of original films and work which becomes a way of getting hired on top shows. I always say at open days: “Only come here if you’re really clear where you want to be as we can help you achieve that.” 4. EXPERIENCE AND LEARNING WORK TOGETHER The whole philosophy of how the courses are taught is learning by doing. Students learn how to be a production manager by production managing multiple films. They learn how to be a composer by doing the music for games,

ABOVE Students working on-set for their graduating film Blood Type .

DEF I N I T ION | SEPTEMBER 20 1 8 09

5 MINUTES WITH | J I HUA ZHENG

Name: Jihua Zheng Age: 40 Location: Beijing Job title: Chief Executive of Kinefinity Years in the job: Six BIOGRAPHY Background: University degree majoring in electronics and design of integrated circuits. Then I got a Masters degree and spent six years in Integrated Circuit design engineering Previous employment: QHYCCD astral cameras as project leader of the cinema camera team

Kinefinity is prospering and already has its own large format camera in the wings; CEO Jihua Zheng explains WORDS & PICTURES ADAM DUCKWORTH CHINESE CHARACTERS MAKING IT MODULAR

PERSON IN THE KNOW: JIHUA ZHENG

F rom a start-up with zero experience in the cinema camera manufacturing industry, it’s taken just six years for Chinese brand Kinefinity to make an impact. As a young company staffed by the latest breed of tech and marketing-savvy engineers and managers, this go-ahead firm is turning heads with its new range of three modular cameras that shoot in Raw and ProRes. The Terra 4K has a sensor that’s just slightly larger than Micro Four Thirds, the Mavo 6K is a Super35 camera and the forthcoming 6K Mavo LF has a full-frame chip. And all are at prices that are a fraction of their Japanese and American rivals. We caught up with the chief exec Jihua Zheng at Kinefinity’s UK distributors ProAv to learn about the company and his plans for the future.

How did the the whole Kinefinity project start? In about 2009 I had some close friends who are cinematographers

who talked about how much the new digital technology was bringing to filmmaking. Arri had launched the Alexa and the RED had been launched as a digital 4K camera shooting Raw. Then the Canon 5D Mark II came out – it was a very exciting time. The Arri and RED were very expensive, and the 5D Mark II could not provide ProRes or Raw. So there was a big chance for a Chinese company to fill that gap.

What was the progression from that point?

The co-founders of Kinefinity, myself included, were working on astral and industrial cameras for QHYCCD so we had some experience as camera makers. QHYCCD started a cinema camera

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5 MINUTES WITH | J I HUA ZHENG

project and I was the leader. After two years research and prototyping, we proved it could be viable so we started Kinefinity as a spin-off company in 2012. QHYCCD is a shareholder, along with other investors. We have no government backing.

How big is the company now? Is everything in-house? We have two teams, one in Beijing for R&D and marketing, and one

in Shenzhen working on manufacturing, supply and calibration. There are fewer than 50 employees but we need to increase production to satisfy the demand. We also needed to work with distributors around the world to give filmmakers the confidence that they could get local support.

Do you get involved much with camera design? My role is as product manager. A cinema camera is a complicated

ABOVE Jihua Zheng and fans with one of his company’s modular cinema cameras.

product – from hardware design, engineering design, software and

all over the world as that’s the best way to do it. We source our sensors from specialist manufacturers rather than making our own. How have your products developed? What was the user feedback? Our prototype camera was the KineRaw S8, with a very small Super 8 2K sensor, but our official first generation product was the KineRaw Super 35, a 2K Raw recording camera that we launched in late 2012. Our first cameras were larger than the current ones. Our customers, especially independent filmmakers which are the biggest group of buyers in most countries, wanted cameras that were more compact. In the UK and USA, the cost of hiring people is very high. In China it’s easier to hire more assistants to carry the cameras for you! Back in 2014, we launched the KineMax which was one of only two 6K cameras, the other being the RED Dragon. Ours shot 100fps in Raw Cinema DNG. to flagship. We aim to keep focusing on these models, improve the firmware and make them easier to use. So we have not finished yet. The Mavo 6K and LF share the same 444XQ and Cinema DNG files with variable compression ratio. For 4K they shoot at 100fps, 66fps at 6K, and have 14 stops of dynamic range. The Terra 6K has been discontinued in favour of the Terra 4K. The Mavo has an improved rolling shutter over the Terra. And, with the What about the current range? What features stand out? We now have the Terra, Mavo and Mavo LF that go from entry level

Kinemount, you can choose from fitting PL, passive E mount, EF or Nikon lenses. Do you plan to include ProResRaw in future? Raw is the future as it gives so much more flexibility. We have Cinema DNG and soon we will have our own new Raw format, KineRaw II. But for speed of grading and for the right compression, ProResRaw is something I think might take over. So, we are in contact with Apple as we would like to have ProResRaw in the future as I see it as the way forward. How did you arrive at the idea of modular design? We held focus groups and what was clear was that colour science and convenience of use were priorities. We asked them about the first Kinefinity S35 which was a big machine and not modular. In 2015, we realised we had to make the camera more compact and lightweight for some users, but other users need more functions. So modularity is the evolution. We designed it with good interfaces so later models can be compatible. We provide a very reasonably priced upgrade to the newer camera and accessories. It’s a good way to protect our customers’ investment. I hope the image quality will be what filmmakers choose our cameras for, as well as ease of use and the modularity. As well as the cost, of course. Arri has a very long history, Sony is huge in broadcasting, RED made the first 4K Raw digital and Canon and Panasonic are giant. But we make better and more affordable tools for filmmakers. Why should a cinematographer choose Kinefinity?

mechanical design to mass production. So we need the best professionals to focus on their area of speciality. At the beginning I was more involved in product design but very quickly I focused on the management. Did you hire any camera engineers from other companies? No. They don’t need to have a camera background. They are very good programmers and hardware designers. It was important that we could design something from a different perspective. For example, our camera has very good image quality but requires much less power than other cameras. Both Terra and Mavo cameras can be powered from only one small battery so it can be stripped down and used as a very small package. And our camera is the only 6K ProRes camera to record internally. It was a difficult job but we did it and we’re proud of that. Who makes the sensors used in your cameras? Electronics is a global market now and everyone buys components from We aim to keep focusing on these models, improve the firmware and make them easier to use

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CONVENTION CORNER | I BC 20 1 8

IBC CONVENTION 2018 If you're heading to Amsterdam for the annual gear fest take a look at our selective preview of some of the stands ONES TO WATCH

COOKE

www.cookeoptics.com

For over 100 years, Cooke has been at the centre of the filmmaking business. This is a company steeped in tradition that has been listening to the community it serves for generations, and while it’s hugely aware of its legacy it’s also remarkably frontiers of technology to offer new and innovative products. On the stand at IBC will be one of these, /i Technology, which enables film and digital cameras to automatically record key lens data for every frame shot and provide it to post-production teams digitally, a process that is invaluable to post- production teams and which greatly speeds up the editing process. Visitors will be able to handle and experience the likes of Cooke S7/i Full Frame Plus and Cooke Panchro/i Classic prime lenses, Cooke S4/i, Cooke Anamorphic/i, Anamorphic/i SF (‘Special Flare’ - pictured) optics and the Cooke S4/i and miniS4/i lenses with and without coatings. forward looking and is constantly pushing the

MOTION IMPOSSIBLE www.motion-impossible.com

Set up in August 2014 by BAFTA award- winning cameraman Rob Drewett and experienced product design engineer Andy Nancollis, Motion Impossible is an equipment manufacturer and production company that has as its remit a passion to create new and innovative ways to move cameras in film, TV and 360° VR. The company is the creator of the Agito Dolly system, which moves and stabilises VR/360º and film cameras, and MI’s filming side, MI Films. At the show the company will be showing its Agito Sports and Trax platforms. Whilst earlier models have already made its mark within the VR/360° market, Motion Impossible has made it its mission to continue the development of the product for the broadcast market. This has culminated in the launch of Agito – a robotic dolly system that can make recordable moves on the ground.

DMG

www.dmglumiere.com

The Mini Mix is a 205x885mm (8x23in) panel rated at 100W output. It will find a use lighting anything from the smaller corners of a film set to a sit- down interview, with a useful ability to create accent coloured backlights or illuminate blue or green screens effectively using highly saturated light. Removable diffusion panels offer control over the output pattern, and the light is compatible with DMG’s add-ons for its existing SWITCH lights, including dome, snapbag and grid accessories, as well as its app. In general it is a diffused soft light with a beam angle near 180˚. The larger SL1 Mix is twice the length and is rated 200W; the even larger Maxi Mix is planned.

SEAGATE AND LACIE www.lacie.com

Encased in the famous orange rubber shell, the Rugged RAID Pro offers up to 240MB/s in RAID 0 and RAID 1 for peace of mind in having a second copy in the field, as well as when transporting content back to the editing studios. With the integrated SD card reader, creative professionals can quickly offload content with the quick import toolkit. The Rugged RAID Pro is designed with the latest USB-C connector and compatible with next-generation Thunderbolt 3 computers but also backward compatible with USB 3.0. While the drive is also shock, dust, crush and water resistant, LaCie includes a three- year limited warranty with Rescue Data Recovery Services.

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I BC 20 1 8 | CONVENTION CORNER

TERADEK

www.teradek.com

At IBC2018, Teradek will be showcasing the latest in zero- delay wireless video systems: the Bolt XT. Completely reimagined, the XT combines great wireless performance with smart design to give cinematographers incredible flexibility on set. Real-time 1080p60 video offers pristine image quality, and powerful software features like a built-in 5GHz spectrum analyzer and 3D LUTs allow professionals to monitor the feed with complete confidence. The Bolt XT receiver features a newly-integrated NATO rail, while the transmitter includes an ARRI Pin-Loc for fast and easy mounting on set. Available battery plates include Gold or V-mount for the Bolt 1000/3000 XT, as well as Sony L-series or Canon LP-E6 plates on the Bolt 500 XT. Bolt XT is compatible with all third-generation Bolt 500, 1000 and 3000 models, as well as 703 Bolt, 10K and Sidekick II units.

ZEISS

www.zeiss.com

At IBC2018 Zeiss will be showcasing a large portfolio of full-frame lenses, including the Cinema Zoom CZ.2 range and new Compact Prime CP.3 XD range. Thanks to their interchangeable mounts and full-frame coverage, these lenses are believed by many filmmakers to be as close as it’s possible to get to the ultimate future-proof investment. The Zeiss Cinema Zoom lenses feature exquisite optics in a robust, durable package. Affordable, flexible and offering the highest quality, the Zeiss Cinema Zoom lenses are an invaluable addition to any film set. Meanwhile the new Zeiss CP.3 and CP.3 XD lenses offer the perfect combination of high image quality and reliable usability. They exhibit the clean, crisp characteristics Zeiss is known for, together with groundbreaking lens data technology in the XD versions, designed to speed up and simplify the workflow on-set and in post-production.

P+S TECHNIK

www.pstechnik.de

P+S TECHNIK will show its anamorphic lens series, Evolution 2X as well as its scope of lens rehousing to visitors at IBC2018. Says MD Anna Piffl: “NAB Show 2018 showed us already that the demand for anamorphic lenses is still increasing. We are ready to provide professional solutions here while keeping in mind larger sensors.” Since 2017 the company has delivered the Evolution 2X anamorphic lenses (for S35 format). Over 100 lenses with the focal length 40mm, 50mm, 75mm and 100mm have already been delivered. The success of the Evolution 2X lenses, which match the look of the original KOWA, encouraged the company to make the 135mm a perfect match. The 135 mm has new front anamorphic elements, to reach the light intensity and a compact design.

BOXX TV

www.boxx.tv

Boxx TV will demonstrate its new Atom and Atom Lite systems. The Boxx Atom system provides a high performance HD wireless solution with an uncapped range in a small and lightweight form factor. New for IBC2018, the Atom range now includes time code and record trigger on all systems and a new smaller form factor premium receiver, all with backward compatibility. Compact and lightweight, the Atom Transmitter offers an SDI loop and HDMI input, ideal for use with Steadicam, portable field monitoring, and UAV video links. For 2018, Boxx TV is attending IBC as part of the Great Britain & Northern Ireland pavilion.

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CONVENTION CORNER | I BC 20 1 8

DEJERO

www.dejero.com

For IBC Dejero has partnered with FileCatalyst, a pioneer in managed file

transfers with a world- leading accelerated file

transfer solution, to enable broadcasters to move large data quickly, securely, and reliably back to base while in the field. A combination of the Dejero GateWay mobile Internet connectivity solution and FileCatalyst Direct enables remote reporting teams to access their station’s media asset management (MAM) systems – to source B roll or background video – to create fully packaged reports, news clips and to upload complete stories faster. The combination of Dejero GateWay mobile Internet connectivity solution and FileCatalyst Direct will be demonstrated at Dejero’s IBC Stand.

PANASONIC

www.panasonic.com

IBC2018 will see Panasonic display the latest innovations in film and TV production. Panasonic will showcase the full VariCam line-up – the flagship VariCam 35, the compact VariCam LT and the VariCam Pure, which provides 4K uncompressed Raw at up to 120fps, all of which can be configured to meet a variety of production scenarios. In 2017 a number of productions shot with VariCam aired, including ITV Studios’ The Moorside in the UK and The Deuce for HBO. The VariCam is also proving popular with Netflix, with productions including Orange is the New Black and Master of None all being shot with the VariCam series. The relatively recently launched AU-EVA1 will also be on show. Thanks to a newly-developed 5.7K Super 35mm sensor, dual-native ISO sensitivity and lightweight design, EVA1 fulfils a wide range of run-and-gun and handheld shooting styles.

PAG

www.paguk.com

PAG will spotlight its unique and revolutionary intelligent linking batteries for high-end cameras and accessories. PAGlink is one of the industry’s most technologically advanced portable power system, available in V and Gold mount formats. Linking batteries combines capacities for longer runtime and a higher current draw (12A) – ideal for powering a camera and multiple accessories simultaneously. The 150Wh PL150 battery offers 50% more capacity than the 96Wh PL96, with no increase in size. Two linked PL150s provide 300Wh. PAGlink means no more time-wasting camera reboots on set. Linked battery charging, developed by PAG, is more efficient and results in smaller, travel-friendly chargers, such as the new pocket-sized Micro Charger. PowerHub is a power distribution plate for camera accessories. It is used sandwiched between two PAGlink batteries. PowerHub is smarter than built-in battery D-Taps because it lets you choose the outputs: D-Tap, Lemo, Hirose or USB, and it keeps accessories powered-up when you hot-swap batteries.

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CONVENTION CORNER | I BC 20 1 8

BAND PRO

www.bandpro.com

Band Pro will be showing the entire range of new IB/E Optics Large Format (50mm

image circle) 1:1 Raptor Macro cine lenses plus

accessories (60mm, 100mm, 150mm, 180mm plus VVx2 Extender and x0.8 Velociter Reducer). Built for the large- format camera world.

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN www.blackmagicdesign.com

There was a time a few years back that Blackmagic launched a camera nearly every year, maybe those times are back as the company has just updated its pocket cinema camera with a 4K version. The all-new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K has a similar handheld form factor to its predecessor with full Four Thirds HDR sensor, automatic dual native ISO with up to ISO 25,600 for low-light performance as well as a claimed 13 stops of dynamic range. The new camera is looking to eliminate external recorders, as it features a USB-C Expansion Port. This allows customers to record using the internal SD/UHS-II and CFast recorders or directly to the same external disks they use for editing and colour correction. The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K will be available from Blackmagic Design resellers worldwide later this year for only US$1,295. www.blackmagicdesign.com

SCHNEIDER schneiderkreuznach.com/en

GF-SLIDER SYSTEM www.g-f-m.net

Visit the Schneider-Kreuznach booth at IBC2018and you’ll be able to find out more about the company’s extensive lens and filter portfolio. Learn how to handle new filter lines like the Radiant Soft or RHOdium Full Spectrum ND, and find out how it’s possible to tell your story in a new emotional, sensational or technical way. This is also a golden opportunity to get hands on with the highly innovative Xenon FF-Prime Cine-Tilt, which was voted best prime lens in our sister title Pro Moviemaker ’s Gear of the Year Awards 2017. Unleash the focus with the first dynamic tiltable lens set and pay attention to the creamy and organic out-of-focus areas of the six-lens Xenon FF-Prime set. Schneider works closely with DOPs to provide great and useful tools to create individual possibilities of storytelling, so go along and say hello and find out what the company might be able to do for your business.

The GF-Slider System is available in seven lengths from 2ft to 10ft. The modular design allows you to swap the precision rails depending on the size of slider required for the shot. The tracking carriage accepts a Mitchell (also 4-Way Leveller available) Bowl and a 80mm Euro-adapter tube mount. As a base mount you can decide between Mitchell and Euro-Adapter. Side plates offer you an unique and fast way for horizontal repositioning. A wide range of accessories, end mounts (lighting stand, levelling legs, scaffold mounts etc.) and 3/8in holes on the rails complete the system. With its very flat profile, smooth tracking, versatility and outstanding reliability the GF- Slider enjoys great popularity among grips and operators.

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CONVENTION CORNER | I BC 20 1 8

VOCAS

www.vocas.com

After many years Vocas redesigned its range of shoulder rigs. The result is a multifunctional camera rig. The new camera rig will function with all kinds of cameras ranging from a Canon EOS 5D or Panasonic AG-UX180 to the Sony PXW-FS5. The shoulder rig is designed in a way that cameras can be operated on top of your shoulder and in an offset position. This flexibility offers shooting options for using both the camera’s external viewfinders and LCD screens. The rig has a 15mm height adjustable rails support which enables compatibility with almost any camera. The ARCA sliding system offers quickly adjustable balancing options.

JVC

www.jvc.com

JVC will demonstrate its range of professional camcorders at IBC2018, which deliver complete end-to-end live production solutions, ideal for news, events, filmmaking and studio production. These include the new GY-HC900 CONNECTED CAM – a 2/3in broadcast camcorder, designed as a news-over-IP workflow solution for live ENG reporting – along with a range of handheld 4K cameras, featuring 3G-SDI, live streaming and graphic overlays. JVC will also show its PTZ cameras and controllers, 4K and UHD production monitors and broadcast studio equipment, along with live streaming solutions from Streamstar.

ARRI

www.arri.com

Celebrating its 101st year in the film business, ARRI will be showing its range of digital cameras including the new LF large- format camera with the new range of Signature lenses designed for exclusive use with the new camera. Also on show will be the new wireless system, high-end lenses, professional camera accessories and growing stable of lighting including the latest SkyPanel S360 LED light. Products include the ALEXA 65, ALEXA SXT, ALEXA Mini and AMIRA cameras, Master Anamorphic lenses and SkyPanel, L-Series and M-Series lights. A major new software update for the SkyPanels will also be on show with updated FX and extended colour control. There is also a new stage mode with smooth dimming to zero.

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ADVERTI SEMENT FEATURE | G -TECHNOLOGY

When you’re on a hectic location shoot involving several cameras, you need a straightforward backup solution. Enter G-Technology’s new Pro SSD range... THE NEED FOR SPEED

T he modern commercial filmmaker is likely to find themselves regularly on the road, tackling large-scale jobs that could involve everything from handheld cameras through to gimbals, drones, B-cameras and everything else in between. All the time the pressure is on to stay organised and achieve ongoing backups of every bit of footage in the field – knowing that one slip could lead to disaster. For seasoned filmmaker Nino Leitner it’s all in a day’s work – he learned early in his career that time spent at the end of the day downloading everything to multiple backup discs was just part of the job. It was a tedious task; the huge files associated with shooting in 4K could take an age to transfer to traditional drives, and someone had to be there at all times to change cards and make sure everything was going smoothly. “Not so long ago this procedure could drag on for hours,” says Nino. “Now, the SSD has come of age and it’s signalling a big change in the way we work. Whereas once they were prohibitively expensive and didn’t

have the capacity to suit our needs, now the latest Pro SSD range from G-Technology is within the budget of many professionals and it’s revolutionised the way we do things, making life on the road so much simpler.” ON THE ROAD Nino has just finished an extensive shoot in Italy and Switzerland, undertaken on behalf of a Miami-based real estate company, the aim being to throw a spotlight on the quality of some of the bespoke accessories that will be going into the company’s properties. The end result is a film destined to be shown to the company’s potential customers, to give a behind-the-scenes feel for the luxury they’re buying into. “It was such a varied job that we had to come at it from all angles,” says Nino, “using a wide variety of cameras such as a Sony A7S, a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and my Mavic drone to meet the brief. Given the fact that we were predominantly shooting with Sony FS7 cameras that were outputting in 4K, using a high bit rate ProRes 4444 codec, we had to have storage that could

cope. We also needed something that would be considerably faster to download to than a hard drive on a laptop, and there was, of course, a need for the drives themselves to be totally reliable and capable of taking the kind of knocks that happen on location.” The freshly arrived G-Technology range of professional-grade SSDs ticked all the boxes and provided solutions at every level, whether for immediate backup in the field or an end-of-day download to a bigger device in the peace of a hotel room. Facing a shooting schedule that involved nearly two weeks away from base, and aware of the vast amount of footage they were going to produce, Nino and his team took all three of the products in the G-Technology Pro SSD range with them. ABOVE Nino Leitner’s shoot for a big US client was the ideal test for the new suite of G-Technology SSDs .

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G -TECHNOLOGY | ADVERTI SEMENT FEATURE

“ THE G -TECHNOLOGY RANGE OF PROFESS I ONAL- GRADE SSDS T I CKED ALL THE BOXES ”

the shoot and – happily for filmmakers on the go – it comes complete with a handle on top to facilitate easy movement. Set up in a hotel room for the evening, alongside the G-DRIVE Pro SSD, all of that day’s material could be transferred over quickly, saving hours of time and giving the team a chance to take a break. Given that some members might have been hard at work capturing the light at sunset through to sundown, creating a 14-hour shooting day, anything that takes away some of the stress is to be welcomed. “We keep three backup copies of everything,” says Nino, “and also have the potential to use the ev series bay on the Shuttle to write to ev series drives, so that we can send footage back to base for the initial edit to begin.” Nino appreciates the opportunity, as he did on this shoot, to work with his own hard drives and SSDs, but there are times when a client might prefer to provide their own backup – and then it’s a case of going right back to the bad old days. “If you’re saving to slow hard drives then someone will have to sit there and input everything,” he says, “and you could be looking at a two-hour job, which then gets charged to the client so it’s doing them no favours either. “The fact is that with these new products from G-Technology, SSDs have effectively come of age and it’s made all of our lives a very great deal easier.”

the back allow multiple daisy-chaining. The G-DRIVE Pro SSD can also achieve up to 2800MB/s transfer speeds, ideal for intensive production schedules – this equates to as much as a terabyte of content transferred in seven minutes or fewer. The G-DRIVE mobile Pro SSD does what it says on the tin, in that it’s portable and robust enough to go anywhere and yet, via its single Thunderbolt 3 port, can still achieve the same lightning-fast speeds as its bigger brothers. “The G-DRIVE mobile Pro SSD is the one we had with us at all times,” explains Nino. “It’s small and light enough to fit in a pocket, has plenty of capacity in 500GB or 1TB models and comes wrapped in a durable case, making it crush proof and shock resistant. This means that should it get accidentally dropped from a height of anything up to three metres, then both the data and the device will survive and, for me, this is a huge reassurance.” The G-SPEED Shuttle SSD was used as the master storage device for the whole of

The daddy of them all is the G-SPEED Shuttle SSD, a scorchingly fast RAID powerhouse in either 8TB or 16TB, with transfer speeds up to 2800MB/s. The eight- bay Shuttle has a built-in hardware RAID controller that ships configured in RAID 5 for maximum performance, but is easily changed to RAID 0, 1, 10 or 50 to provide a versatile and flexible storage solution. Dual Thunderbolt 3 ports allow daisy-chaining to up to five additional devices so it’s possible to stay connected to multiple drives, 4K displays and more through a single connection to a laptop. Meanwhile, the G-DRIVE Pro SSD is an aluminium desktop SSD available in 960GB, 1.92TB, 3.84TB and 7.68TB capacities and, once again, dual Thunderbolt 3 ports on

MORE INFORMATION: www.ninofilm.net www.g-technology.com

IMAGES The G-Technology SSDs could be easily used alongside each other for speedy transfers.

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SHOOT STORY | VAN I TY FA I R

T h e g i rl c a n’t h elp i t

ITV Drama has produced a feast for our televisions with a seven-episode retelling of Vanity Fair

WORDS JULI AN M ITCHELL / PICTURES ITV DRAMA

I TV’s drama offering is on the rise again with a new adaptation of WilliamMakepeace Thackeray’s Vanity Fair . Production company Mammoth Screen has made this episodic for ITV and Amazon Video but how is it different from any other British made period drama? DOP Ed Rutherford was sent the script while he was still shooting another ‘of the time’ dramas, Victoria . “You could tell by the script, the way it was written, the projection of character, the sense of the epoch. We’re talking about 1815 to 1823, we’re on the edge of the industrial revolution with all that social change about to happen, so a gender protagonist story was extremely exciting. James Strong the director certainly didn’t want a period drama in the sense that you might expect previously of terrestrial TV shows. It would be contemporary visual storytelling.”

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VAN I TY FA I R | SHOOT STORY

DEF I N I T ION | SEPTEMBER 20 1 8 25

SHOOT STORY | VAN I TY FA I R

NON-PERIOD PERIOD DRAMA So Director James Strong was never a massive fan of period drama – it was down to him then to move away from that style. “The Jane Austen stuff doesn’t immediately appeal to me so the first big challenge was to produce a period drama that appealed to those who didn’t like them, like me. Also I wanted to shoot in a contemporary drama way, it just happens to be set in the 1800s. It’s easy to say that but what does that mean? It ends up with the choice of cameras and lenses being very important. We went for RED and the Primos as I wanted a modern scale so we got big 10mm lenses to give our locations scale; but it has intimacy also with some handheld shots. We wanted a slightly beautiful reality but sort of with a realness to it. The contemporary feel was reflected in all aspects including the performances. Where in real life people talk fast and interrupt each other, I wanted that in this period drama. I just wanted to give it a bit of attitude and a bit of swagger.” Director and DOP were therefore on the same page as far as the look went; they wanted this ‘bold beautiful reality’, a strong colour palette, a dynamic, fluid camera. “We didn’t want to be afraid of pointing the camera towards what was important in the frame,” continued Ed. “We didn’t want a style that would overpower, but to have a slightly new wave feel. We wanted a certain freshness, an ability to break the rules. A bit like the main character Becky Sharp who was very much a rule breaker herself in a time when there was no social mobility. To get the chance to tell that story now with the gender politics of our time was very timely and exciting.”

We wanted a certain freshness, an ability to break the rules

SETTING THE STYLE Ed and James encouraged each other to push the look, not in an overbearing style way but more in its confidence in colour palette, camera work, optics and lighting style. Both were agreed on the tone of the piece they wanted to make but at the heart of this boldness must be a strong set of rules to stop the look running away with itself. Ed describes James’ set of rules for the shooting. “It’s fine to de-construct something but you have to be judicious with that so it has intent. When you do something that is episodic, like Vanity Fair ’s seven episodes, it’s about staying true to the rules you are adhering to so the style is consistent and coherent as you move through the various story arcs. I really felt that we did that. “James had this note, a Goethe quote, which he sent to me which read ‘As soon as one becomes aware of the intention the senses are numb’. He wanted us not to be ‘tricksy’ but he wanted us to be confident. My interpretation of that was to take Becky’s character and have a new wave feel. I thought of The 400 Blows movie directed by François Truffaut; the last shot of that film on the beach where the camera pans and then it zooms in to the kid. He then looks back and breaks the fourth wall. I can’t remember when I first saw that film but I do remember getting goosebumps with that new wave zoom if you like and then the breaking of the fourth wall. I’ve always loved that but it’s not very fashionable,

ABOVE Director James Strong. BELOW Camera Operator Roger Tooley with the RED Dragon camera.

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VAN I TY FA I R | SHOOT STORY

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SHOOT STORY | VAN I TY FA I R

THE COLOUR OF VANITY FAIR

the zoom certainly isn’t fashionable and breaking the fourth wall is controversial and can get you sacked if you do it at the wrong time. So we took that and it was controversial breaking the fourth wall, it provoked discussions with the executives but it’s been really exciting to see the cuts as we had options. It’s a little construct that’s run through; every now and again her character might do that look to camera. But it’s very fitting in a contemporary way as a revelation of her character against the maybe sombre character of the ensemble.” Breaking the fourth wall was always in James’ mind. He got a bit of resistance initially to the idea but when it started coming through in the edit it was clear that it was making all the difference. “It makes you feel you’re with her and on her side. How do you manifest the feeling of a fun, maverick rule breaker? This was the only way I could think of: when she looks at you in key moments. It was so popular with the executives then we had to manufacture a few more by moving her eyes in post.” NEW WAVE ZOOM This encouraged Ed to use the zoom more, but in a way that tried to hide it, by using it on a Steadicam for example. “This isn’t done very much but is very exciting to do. When for instance we do a master for a scene we might use a Steadicam and push the zoom in to a character; generally that is Becky as she’s in most of the scenes. We would use it subtly, not in a dramatic way, just move the focal length but use it as a zoom rather than a track adjustment. Rather a camera that uses a zoom because you haven’t necessarily got a dolly; we’ve tried to use it with dramatic purpose like on the emotional beat of the scene. One of James’ rules was he wanted a zoom in every scene so pretty much we did that. Interestingly in the cuts we dialled back from this a bit.” With the zooms the camera would always find Becky in the scene and something that was significant in the frame. James didn’t want a wandering camera;

Definition: In terms of colour, what was the look that James and Ed wanted to achieve on Vanity Fair ? Dan Coles, senior colourist: I’ve graded some amazing period dramas before, but having the chance to work with James and Ed on Vanity Fair at Technicolor was a very exciting opportunity! Ed and I did some pre-production camera tests together where we effectively began our first discussions on the look of Vanity Fair – not just the grade itself but we also discussed cameras, lenses, filtration, costume, make-up, lighting, sets, locations, production design etc. The process was an immensely collaborative one – and was invaluable in helping to create the look for Vanity Fair . When it came to the grade itself James, Ed and I all felt that colours should not be subdued as is so often the way in period drama. On the contrary in fact, we felt we wanted them to pop – the red uniforms of the soldiers being the best example of this – and for there to always be a sense of richness to the on-screen image – rich in colour and also rich in contrast. Some scenes, particularly night scenes, have a stronger sense of blue and other cooler tones but still retain a fairly strong sense of overall colour. We wanted a filmic feel, and used

shapes, diffusion and grads to add depth to the image whenever necessary. So really we ended up with a rich, glossy and saturated look – which totally suited the overall aim – to give a newer, much more modern feel to this classic. Def: How would you sum up the majority of the work you did on the show? DC: The majority of the work I did was in finessing the images and helping to achieve a really authentic and believable look for the period that suited our overall brief. Once the look of any particular scene is established then continuity is the most important part of the grading process – and also the most time consuming. Def: Was there a deliberate plan not to follow the ‘dark and candlelit’ feeling of traditional period drama? DC: It is fair to say we wanted to move away from the more traditional period drama look to achieve something that feels newer, exciting, ‘pop-y’, rich, vibrant and with a modern twist, however – not all of the time. Vanity Fair still has elements of darkness and moodiness – there are quite a few scenes in which darker and more muted colours work well and suit the narrative of the overall piece perfectly.

BELOW Olivia Cooke as Becky Sharp breaks the fourth wall with one of the show’s signature looks to camera.

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