Cambridge Edition February 2019

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YOU R MON T H L Y F I X OF LOCA L L I F E

E D I T I O N

CITY FROM FOOD & DRINK TO ARTS & CULTURE: YOUR MONTHLY GUIDE TO LIFE IN CAMBRIDGE LOVE Your

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EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459

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nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editor Felicity Evans Junior sub editor Elisha Young ADVERTISING Senior sales executive Lee Fifield 01223 492240 leefifield@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Cathy Moore, Cyrus Pundole, Charlotte Griffiths, Siobhan Godwood, Daisy Dickinson, Elodie Cameron, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Anna Taylor, Charlotte Phillips DESIGN & PRODUCTION Senior designer & production manager Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong 01223 499468 manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area. FIND US @CAMBSEDITION

ebruary may be a short month, but it’s promising to be a good one here in Cambridge. After a sleepy January, the events calendar begins to stir as we look forward to new events, such as the Cambridge Song Festival, and welcome back old favourites like Twilight at the Museums. The latter – a chance to explore the city’s museums by night, joining in with activities, marvelling at light displays and more – is not to be missed for

families. For grown-ups in search of a twilight adventure though, I wholeheartedly recommend Botanic Nights, which sees the Botanic Gardens transformed by spectacular illuminations you can enjoy while strolling about, glass of wine in hand! Find out more on page 6. If you’re experiencing a bit of winter fatigue, head to our arts column, where Ruthie Collins suggests some reinvigorating and revitalising creative experiences to be had in Cambridge, or get back to nature with Anna Taylor, who’s got the low-down on garden jobs and joys for February. Speaking of the great outdoors: have you ever wondered about the story behind the handsome cows that roam the city’s green spaces? Wonder no more and flick to page 48, where we meet their caretakers and explore our city ’ s unique collision between urban and rural ways of life. Elsewhere, we chat to writer Katri Skala about her stunning new novel A Perfect Mother in our Book Club (page 23), while Dolly Alderton – Times columnist and bestselling author– talks work, love and rosé-fuelled girls’ nights out over on page 32. There’s also ideas for Valentine’s meals (page 56), plus a fantastic line-up of gigs to help you dance away these chilly

nights. Whether you fancy some raucous brassy fun with the Hot 8 or a laid-back evening of exquisite folk with the Transatlantic Sessions collective, turn to our After Hours pages and get inspired. Enjoy the issue and see you next month! Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Flo Thomas . See more of Flo’s illustrations on Etsy at HeydayDesignsUK or at heydaydesigns.co.uk

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

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C ONTENTS

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l STARTERS Top things to do and see in the city, plus our favourite social media pics 9 l ARTS & CULTURE Exhibitions, concerts and theatre highlights to enjoy in February 21 l ART INSIDER Ruthie Collins, founder of Cambridge Art Salon, shares her arty picks of the month 23 l BOOK CLUB Book recommendations, special offers and author interviews 27 l AFTER HOURS Comedy, festivals, gigs and more nightlife fun to seek out this month 32 l HELLO DOLLY Edition chats with Dolly Alderton, who speaks in Cambridge this month 37 l FAMILY Kid-friendly activities to keep your brood entertained in February 39 l LISTINGS Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this month 44 l FOOD NEWS All the latest news and gossip from the Cambridge culinary scene 48 l CATTLE CLASS We meet the bovine residents of the city’s green spaces

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76 l INDIE OF THE MONTH We meet the local company reaching dizzying heights with their aerial experiences business 78 l FASHION Inspired by the Spring/Summer 2019 catwalk shows, we’re going mad for leopard print 81 l BEAUTY & WELLNESS Beauty products you need on your radar, a new ethical hair salon and more 87 l EDUCATION We talk to local schools about maximising school open days to aid your decision-making 103 l GARDENS Anna offers tips and advice on what’s happening in the garden this month 107 l INTERIORS Angelina on creating cosy corners: aka the perfect spots for hibernating

l MAKE THE BEST A quick, tasty recipe for a Sichuan-inspired beef and celery dish 55 l CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer uses his powers of reduction to create the ultimate comfort food 56 l THE FOOD OF LOVE Get set for a delicious Valentine’s Day with these romantic dining spots and tasty gifts 61 l NATURE’S LARDER The Gog farm shop on creating the ultimate Valentine’s feast at home 62 l DRINKS TROLLEY Wine tips, cocktail recipes and our favourite hidden drinking dens 65 l WEDDINGS Inspiration for planning your perfect big day, from venues to dresses

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FEBRUARY ESSENTIAL

BOTANIC NIGHTS

The much-loved Cam Lates series continues on the 21st with Botanic Nights: a chance to see the city’s Botanic Garden in a whole new light. Grab a mulled wine or craft beer from the Thirsty bar and go on an after-dark adventure exploring the famous gardens, which will be illuminated by magical light displays. Take in the 80-metre range, which houses displays showing how plants have evolved to survive in different environments across the world. From icy mountains, oceanic islands and arid lands to the nicely heated tropics, wander the specially lit changing climates. It runs 6.30pm to 8.30pm and tickets are £18, which includes two drinks. Over 18s only. museums.cam.ac.uk

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STARTERS

GET ON BOARD DR AGON BOAT FEST I VAL Now’s the time to gather together your team for the Cambridge Dragon Boat Festival 2019: a fun-packed day of river racing all in aid of a great cause. This year’s event will take place on Saturday 7 September on a stretch of the River Cam out at Fen Ditton, and more than 40 teams are expected to compete over the 200m race course, watched by hundreds of spectators. Up to ten people paddle each boat with a drummer at the front beating time and a helm at the tail steering a straight course. No previous experience is required, just plenty of team spirit! dragonboatfestivals.co.uk

The club night for the not-so-nocturnal returns this month for a cocktail-and-cake-filled tenth birthday bash at La Raza on 15 February. The event was founded by Alex Ruczaj and Nick Welsh, who wanted to create an event especially for an older crowd who still love to go out dancing. “It started as a random idea of wanting to go out ourselves. I tried a couple of normal clubs, but found them empty at 10pm. With young kids at home, I had to be leaving just when these places were getting going, not to mention we were at least a decade older than most of the other clubbers and felt very out of place,” commented Alex. “I started to think there was a market for a club night that started early and finished early. Just shifting everything up a few hours – either for parents or for older professionals, anyone that would rather be in bed by midnight, but still wanted to party!” ENC was born: a fun party which starts early and finishes early, and always has a packed dancefloor. It’s definitely captured people’s imagination, with each event swiftly selling out. “There is a real buzz about the event, a real excitement amongst the punters. It has become far more than a night out. I would go as far as to say that it is a lifeline for many people – a release from the drudgeries of life, a chance to reconnect with who you once were, who you really are – and just let go on the dance floor. Be with your friends, and have a laugh.” Usually on a Thursday night, ENC will be celebrating its decade milestone with a Friday night outing – so if you do want to stay and celebrate the fact that you don’t have to be up for work or the school run, the venue will be open until 1am. It’s priced at £10 per ticket, which includes cake and a glass of fizz. earlynightclub.com EARLY NIGHT CLUB TURNS 10

ONE TO TRY WYLDE SKY BREWING

Craft beer fans: make a beeline for Linton, where Wylde Sky Brewing is making waves with its super-cool microbrewery and taproom. Sip on a delicious American Pale Ale, slurp your way through a couple of refreshingly tart Saisons, or have a go on the gently smoky Scottish 60 – you can enjoy them fresh from the brewery in the taproom, which also hosts live music and street food trucks at the weekends. Keep up to date with the beer-fuelled adventures on Twitter at @wyldeskybrewing. wyldeskybrewing.com

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Culture Club

ART EXHIBITIONS • THEATRE • BOOK CLUB • CONCERTS

Explore the city ’ s museums by night at Twilight at the Museums this month

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ARTS & CULTURE

ILLUMINATING CAMBRIDGE LIBRARIES Libraries, those keepers of knowledge and places of quiet work, are celebrated this month in an exhibition at the Heong Gallery featuring Sara Rawlinson’s photography. Illuminating Cambridge Libraries, from 11 to 17 February, showcases the tangible materials, textures and ephemeral light that work together to create the contemplative spaces where knowledge thrives. It features libraries from 25 colleges at the University of Cambridge and also features lecterns designed in the late 17th century by Christopher Wren, on loan from the Wren Library at Trinity College. Rawlinson spent much of her childhood in her grandmother’s darkroom in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and now runs a fine art photography studio from her home in Cambridge. Last year, she had three images shortlisted for Historic Photographer of the Year 2018. sararawlinson.com

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TWILIGHT AT THE MUSEUMS

Botanic Garden provides a quest for the long-term survival of some of the world’s most endangered plants. Jenny Bull, University of Cambridge Museums engagement co-ordinator, says: “We hope children and parents join us for another action-packed evening exploring their local museums and collections after dark. We’re delighted that other collections across Cambridgeshire, as far as Wisbech & Fenland Museum, are joining in by hosting their own after-dark adventures on the same night again this year.” Among the non-university bodies taking part are Cambridge Science Centre on Clifton Road and All Saints’ Church on Jesus Lane in Cambridge, the Cromwell Museum in Huntingdon, Newmarket’s National Horseracing Museum and the Norris Museum in St Ives. Pick up a copy of the Twilight What’s On leaflet or visit the website for full listings. www.museums.cam.ac.uk/whats-on/ twilight-at-the-museums

trail through darkened galleries and for real adventurers, the Museum of Cambridge hosts a hunt for treasure and promises secrets – if you can find them! As darkness falls, creatures of the night come out to play, so hunt for lurking rodents at the Museum of Technology, discover all kinds of nocturnal animals at the University Museum of Zoology and watch out for a giant spider, rumoured to be creeping around the light displays at Kettle’s Yard. If exploring isn’t for you, treat your ears at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, with a magical mystery tour featuring music from Beats of Polynesia, while the University Library displays its collection of manuscripts by candlelight, accompanied by authentic music from the time. There’s a chance to meet some of the great historical explorers at The Polar Museum, or look further into the past at the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. With a foot in the future, the Cambridge University

After-dark openings return at 14 collections across Cambridge museums this half-term. Uncover buried secrets with members of your family and watch as children discover fascinating objects and start a journey of discovery. Twilight at the Museums is on 20 February, from 4.30pm to 7.30pm, with many of the venues close to each other – making multiple short trips a possibility on the night. Perhaps a trip through time, followed by a torch-lit treasure trail? Or maybe a quest to find fluorescent creatures, before a mesmerising voyage through the stars? Shine a light on something new: an amazing fact, event or object – with free special trails and games, outdoor entertainment and pop-up food stalls to keep you going. For those in search of wonder, The FitzwilliamMuseum is collaborating with the Whipple Museum to create a starry night of light displays and astronomy. For mystery and the strange, pop over to the Museum of Classical Archaeology for a spooky

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ARTS & CULTURE

THE CAMBRIDGE SONG FESTIVAL The Cambridge Song Festival takes to the stage for the first time this month with three recitals celebrating the meeting of words, music, voice and instrument. Directed by pianist Ceri Owen, the programme features both acclaimed and up-and-coming singers and pianists in song recitals across three colleges. “Through words and music, we’ll be telling stories, creating characters and exploring a huge range of human emotion and experience,” explains Ceri. It launches on 15 February with A Cambridge Songbook , in the atmospheric chapel at Jesus College. Award-winning young singers Jess Dandy, James Way and Jennifer Witton will perform songs by composers with ties to the city, from Ralph Vaughan Williams to leading contemporary composers Richard Causton, Cheryl Frances-Hoad and Graham Ross. Internationally acclaimed tenor Robert Murray and pianist AndrewWest perform Schubert’s Winter Journey on 16 February at St John’s College Old Divinity School. The 24-song cycle is interspersed with extracts from Captain Scott’s Antarctic diaries, read by actor and poet, Seán Street. Closing the festival is Folklore and Fairytales , featuring two Jette Parker Young Artists at the Royal Opera House – Dominic Sedgwick (baritone) and Jacquelyn Stucker (soprano, pictured right) – who join Ceri Owen to perform songs from Hugo Wolf’s Italian Songbook and from George Butterworth, Alban Berg and Claude Debussy on 17 February at Sidney Sussex College Chapel. Tickets £5 for students and under 35s, other tickets from £10. cambridgesongfestival.co.uk

BEANS ON TOAST Beans on Toast is something of a cult national treasure on the alt-folk scene. What seemed a throwaway festival act in the mid-noughties has evolved into a voice of truth and honesty. For his tenth album, Beans – real name Jay McAllister, who comes from Braintree – has gone back to the man who produced his first offering, Ben Lovett, of Mumford & Sons. At the time, Mumford & Sons were recording their own album at Paul Epworth’s The Church Studios, where Bob Dylan, Radiohead and Adele have recorded. During the band’s days off, or in between their sessions, Beans and Ben snuck into the studio to create A Bird in the Hand . The album is a celebration of love, life, family and the world we live in. Expect the show to provide the same ethos. Catch Beans on Toast at the Junction on 4 February. Tickets £17. junction.co.uk

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BANFF MOUNTA IN FILM FEST I VAL

And for those who can’t get out of bed to do Parkrun, meet 97-year-old George Etzweiler. He started competing in the annual 7.6 mile race up Mount Washington when he was 69. The star of For the Love of Mary , he carries something special in every step: the memory of his late wife of 68 years, Mary. Tour director Nell Teasdale says: “We guarantee that the tenth anniversary atmosphere at the shows will be buzzing – and that audiences will go home inspired to have an adventure of their own as well.” Tickets are £16.50, £29 for both evenings, £15 concessions, with films given a 12A rating. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

committee in Canada’s Rocky Mountains. It features two collections of new films (one each night at the Corn Exchange) from the most intrepid filmmakers, starring pioneers and explorers in the wildest corners of the planet. Film highlights include This Mountain Life , featuring Martina and her 60-year-old mother, Tania, on an epic ski crossing from Vancouver to Alaska that took six months through relentless mountain wilderness. RJ Ripper is a fascinating blend of mountain sports, scenery and culture, as mountain biker Rajesh (RJ) Magar explores his homeland, Nepal – from the chaotic streets of Kathmandu to the Himalayan mountains beyond.

Aiming for adventure but a little too cold just now to go out and do it yourself? Or perhaps you’re out climbing in all types of weather? Either way, this month sees the return of the jaw-dropping, spellbinding cinematic treat that is the Banff Mountain Film Festival – a collection of the best documentary films about people pushing their boundaries, with fantastic, challenging landscapes guaranteed. The festival embarks on a world tour every year and this is its tenth anniversary. Taking place over three months, the tour stops by at the Corn Exchange on 15 and 16 February. The films in the tour are selected every November from hundreds of entries by a

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ARTS & CULTURE

CAMBR IDGE QUEER VALENT INE’ S See comedians, slam poets, dancers, DJs and more this Valentine’s Day, at an evening celebrating queer love at Cambridge Junction. The event is organised by the Kite Trust, Cambridgeshire’s leading organisation working with LGBT+ young people, and features a line-up of talent that includes critically acclaimed comic Jen Brister, who you might know from Live at the Apollo and who Time Out described as “gorgeously talented”. She’s joined by multi-award- winning UK National Poetry Slam Champion, Toby Campion – “the voice of a generation” according to Sunday Politics . Singer-songwriter Grace Petrie (pictured above) will charm with her music and there’ll also be a chance to learn to dance with London’s Queer Tango. Lara Jaffey, executive director of the Kite Trust, says: “Valentine’s is a day to celebrate love and, for us as a charity, this is crucial, as we work to ensure that all young people, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity, can live in a world free from discrimination and judgement about who they are attracted to.” She adds: “We’re thrilled to be bringing together a message of love and acceptance with our major annual fundraiser. With ever-shifting political and financial climates, having a local support base enables us to continue to provide crucial services to LGBT+ young people. This event will be a great way to show your commitment and have a fantastic evening out.” £20 for a table seat or £13 for a balcony seat. junction.co.uk

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ARTS & CULTURE

ARTS THEATRE NEW SEASON The new season at the Cambridge Arts Theatre features something for everyone, whether you like crime mysteries, great impersonations, wicked witches, classic musicals or cool jazz, with Noël Coward and a bit of the Bard thrown in, too. Ian Rankin’s acclaimed Rebus book series has dominated detective fiction in recent years, now it’s adapted for the stage for the first time, as the Arts Theatre presents its own co-production Rebus: Long Shadows , starring Game of Thrones actors Ron Donachie and John Stahl, plus Mona Lisa actor Cathy Tyson from 11 to 16 February. For a game of spot the voice, head along on 3 February for a show by Rory Bremner and Jan Ravens, two of Britain’s finest impressionists, as they join forces, together with special guest Jo Caulfield. For more laughs, there’s world-famous student comedy troop Cambridge Footlights, featuring Sunday night stand-up, sketches and songs on 10 and 17 March. Those shows come either side of The Comedy About a Bank Robbery , from 19 February to 2 March, by the team that created The Play that Goes Wrong . Matthew Cottle and Charlie Stemp feature in Tom Stoppard’s Rough Crossing , from 8 to 13 April, as playwrights headed for New York on an ocean liner, while Josie Lawrence and Freddie Fox star in Edmond de Bergerac , a multi-award-winning comedy that has gone down a storm in France, from 15 to 20 April. Mark Benton and Nigel Harman star in David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross , a tale of stress, not success, for Chicago salesmen facing high stakes from 11 to 16 March. Meanwhile, acting royalty, in the shape of Simon Callow and Jane Asher, star in A Song for Twilight , by Noël Coward, from 4 to 9 March. Another national treasure, actor Ian McKellen, performs as part of his birthday tour, talking about his prolific career on 10 and 11 May. The Worst Witch leaps from the page to the stage in an adaptation of Jill Murphy’s books, featuring songs, music and magic perfect for anyone aged seven and up, from 6 to 10 February. Ballet Black return on 7 and 8 May, contrasting dramatic and inventive storytelling in a lively showcase of modern ballet, while jazz fans can see Cambridge- based saxophonist Dan Forshaw and his sextet pay homage to a pivotal year for the genre on 3 March, in 1959: The Year That Jazz Changed . From 2 to 6 April, opera fans can enjoy English Touring Opera’s season of Kings and Queens in the battle for love, loyalty and power, with three operas: Giuseppe Verdi’s Macbeth , Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Idomeneo and Gioachino Rossini’s Elizabeth I . A new take on Shakespeare’s Richard III is promised by Headlong, from 24 to 27 April, while renowned historian David Starkey presents an evening exploring the marriage customs of the British monarchy, from the Middle Ages to Meghan Markle, on 28 April. Whodunnit fans can feast on Agatha Christie’s The Mirror Crack’d , adapted by Rachel Wagstaff (19 to 23 March), while there’s intrigue of a psychological kind in Equus (26 to 30 March). For fans of horror, The House on Cold Hill , adapted from the novel by Peter James, is a tale of intrigue and mystery with a terrific cast (20 to 25 May). cambridgeartstheatre.com

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Talk about forward planning! Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox are touring with the goal of preparing the world for the next decade – one that Bradlee hopes will see a return to the style that typified the music of past generations. “Last time around, the ’20s gave us jazz, America’s one true art form. Who knows what is possible in the 2020s?” asks Scott. “There are a lot of folks tired of the clickbait headlines, mindless reality TV, and smartphone addiction that has only served to divide people in the last decade. We’re using our small corner of the pop culture space to tell people to forget their troubles and join us for a night of celebrating true musical talent.” The Welcome to the Twenties 2.0 tour visits 250 venue and stops by at the Cambridge Corn Exchange on 21 February. “Get ready for the most sensational ’20s party this side of The Great Gatsby ,” says Scott. Tickets start at £30.50. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk SCOTT BRADLEE’S POST MODERN JUKEBOX

WHISTLER & NATURE A revolutionary attitude towards the natural world is behind a new exhibition, Whistler & Nature, at The FitzwilliamMuseum. James McNeill Whistler produced paintings ranging from his celebrated London Nocturnes to European and pastoral scenes. The museum focuses on 90 oil paintings, drawings and objects (such as his sketchbook) to show how his vision of nature was underpinned by a kinship with the makers of railways, bridges and ships. He came from a family of soldiers and engineers, as well as being a military map-maker. Expect an exploration of the contrast between the natural and the man-made world. Whistler & Nature continues until 17 March. fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

ACADEMY OF ANCIENT MUSIC The cello’s human voice comes alive when played by Nicolas Altstaedt, who brings out the colours of the instrument in the latest concert from the Academy of Ancient Music on 27 March. He performs Haydn’s Cello Concerto No. 1 in C major , a lost work for nearly 200 years until the ’60s, at West Road Concert Hall, in a work that stretches the form of the baroque concerto to its limits. aam.co.uk

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ARTS & CULTURE

The Art Insider RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH

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ebruary arrives, bringing with it fresh energy for 2019. Now is the perfect time of year to reinvigorate your life with art

The place has a lovely feeling, it’s not competitive like a gym might feel. People are good to each other.” The initiative has really taken off, with evident demand, but Hemming says the plan is to grow membership and plans slowly. “We intend to limit membership so there will always be a wheel if someone wants it. We want everyone to have a great experience. We’d like to build things up slowly but surely and eventually host masterclasses, getting a well-known potter in to do specialist classes; glazing, or maybe throwing with porcelain. We will be running at least two exhibitions a year, too.” Hemming continues: “Kiln Cambridge feels a great place to be – we’re getting really positive feedback. For some people making things with their hands is really important; pottery can get you hooked.” Technician and artist in residence Tarragon Smith, educated at Central St Martins School of Design, says Kiln Cambridge is “a safe place for artistic exchange”. He adds: “All ideas are welcome. We hope and trust it will turn into a place of fruitful productivity.” Kiln Cambridge has given potter David R Stonehouse what he describes as ‘that freedom to explore’.“You can learn from each other instead of working alone at the end of the garden! To start the year with a new space is exciting.” Those seeking a new read to get stuck into this spring, let’s hear it for the

long-awaited release of the first in Gytha Lodge’s murder mystery series, She Lies in Wait , published by Harper Collins. With ‘Six friends, one killer – who can you book club. Cambridge itself seems to produce an alarmingly high number of crime writers – myself included, ahem – so for anyone out there penning their own, it’s great to hear Gytha’s encouraging words. “I used to think of writing novels in terms of overnight success,” she tells me. “It’s only gradually that I’ve realised overnight success doesn’t really happen. Writing, like everything else, is a craft, and you learn it, you work at it, and you build opportunities for yourself. For everyone who’s struggling and feels like giving up, don’t. It’s taken me 20 years to even get this far. Keep writing.” I first met Gytha at a night by experimental art collective SHINDIG. Her story-to-publication journey is a total must-read for any artist needing encouragement (read it on her blog imperfectsingleparent.blog). Or check out wattpad.com/GythaLodge – where she’s had six million reads of her young adult/kids fiction. It just goes to show that sometimes the most tenacious thing you can do as an artist is diversify into new territories. Keep going. So, if you’re getting that instinct to experiment, why not take up throwing a pot? Or going in a new direction? As novelist Elizabeth Speller, who teaches creative writing at the University of Cambridge, said to me trust?’ as its punchy hook, this seems like the perfect read for a

or creative expression. Artists who work with clay, ceramicists, potters or perhaps those that simply want to try something new – check out Kiln Cambridge, a new addition to the city’s arts infrastructure. This is a well serviced, open access pottery studio, with three kilns, plenty of natural light and space to work. It’s a resource that’s long been needed in the city, so it’s no surprise it’s flourishing. “Kiln Cambridge was set up towards the end of 2018 by my partner, who’s a part-time potter, and myself,” explains painter Stephanie Hemming. “He was looking for a studio and the thought of working alone hit him – the reality of that. So to have a space with other potters that’s open and light, with decent facilities, is amazing. “We had our open evenings in November and December and virtually everyone who came signed up. We had a party. I’m very proud of what we’ve achieved,” she continues. “We wanted to create a beautiful space and give the community access to it. A studio has a high start-up cost, so not everyone can do this for themselves. “The only thing people won’t be allowed to do is fire the kiln; there’s a technician who does that. Otherwise, it will feel like their own place. People who are stuck get support and coaching.

recently, talking about the various art forms there are – ‘they’re all connected’. All part of the fun. Whatever you do, have an

“Kiln Cambridge is a safe place for artistic exchange. All ideas are welcome”

inspiring and experimental February, all! l

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BOOK CLUB

CAMBRIDGE EDI T ION Boo k Clu b BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

A PERFECT MOTHER BY KATRI SKALA INTERVIEW BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS THIS MONTH’S BOOK CHOICE EXPLORES RELATIONSHIPS, LOVE, PARENTING, VIOLENCE AND LEGACY, ALL SET AGAINST THE UNCERTAINTY OF WHETHER A CRIME HAS BEEN COMMITTED

F irst published in September 2018, A Perfect Mother by Katri Skala is a gripping, complex and rewarding existential novel. It explores the universal themes of ageing, people’s relationships with their parents and the stories we choose to tell about our lives – all set against the stunning and richly textured historical backdrop of Trieste. Oh – and there’s even a book club. The storytelling in A Perfect Mother is so accomplished, the plotting so deft,

that it comes as quite a surprise to discover this is Katri’s first novel – but the author has had some time to work on this particular story. “I started way back in 2010, then had a critical mass of the book by 2013,” she says. “I revised a lot over the following years, helped by a few readers and my editor at Hikari, and by an MA in 20th-century literature at UEA. It really honed my skills as a close reader and helped me formulate what it is about good writing that I value.”

Katri finds routine essential when working on a book, with as few interruptions as possible. “I work best in sprints of several days when I do nothing but immerse myself in the writing,” she says. “That’s not to say I’m scribbling away every minute, accumulating word count – on the contrary, often I might be doing household chores, or walking or doodling in a notebook – just that I write best when no other major demand is made of my brain. When I’ve got u

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BOOK CLUB

a critical mass, I can do the revisions anytime, anywhere. But the tough stuff of working the imagination and breaking the white page requires, for me, a lot of empty space. I’ve actually just started work on another novel that’s historical fiction – something I thought I’d never write! But I had an idea, several years ago, and the idea has stayed with me and I’ve done quite a bit of research so, we’ll see… It’s an experiment, as writing always is.” A Perfect Mother is written entirely from the perspective of its main character, Jacob, who visits Trieste in northern Italy to research his great-grandfather, who went missing in the city in 1938. “I had no idea where the novel was going when I first started,” Katri reveals. “I had some characters, a place and a few ideas I wanted to explore. As the characters evolved, through writing and research, the story began to take shape.” On why the real-life Trieste captured her imagination, Katri says: “It’s at the crossroads of Europe, a place where writers and exiled royals washed up through the centuries – James Joyce lived there for many years – and is a city associated with exile.” involving the meeting of strangers. Katri wanted to explore how strangers have a useful habit of telling each other secrets that they don’t normally reveal to those who know them well. In A Perfect Mother, the reader is only ever told what Jacob knows and experiences, and meets other characters at the same time that he does, which keeps a tight focus on his storyline. In order to plot the book, Katri actually wrote a great deal of first-person narrative from the viewpoint of the other two central characters, Jane and Charlotte. “Most of which was not used in the actual novel,” explains Katri. “So Jacob’s interactions with them, through talking, texts and email (and then of course what he actually feels and thinks about them) is a sifted version.” The novel asks big questions about parenting, histories and personal identity, and touches on huge universal themes that could easily overwhelm the reader – so having a single narrator keeps the story under tight control. But this required a lot of groundwork during the book’s construction. “I was keen to keep central the idea that we only know each other and love each other through the stories we hear and tell,” Katri says. “So Jacob comes to Trieste because of the stories told to him by his grandfather and he comes to know both women as they tell him stories about themselves – and each other. He is a somewhat passive character, who gains more agency as the events of the novel unfold. I felt I fully had to know all the characters and the She decided to use this historic location as the setting for a story

events that informed their lives and their pasts before I could more formally ‘plot’ the novel. This only happened after I’d written a draft.” And the meaning of the title? “I was interested in exploring questions and assumptions about parenting, so the title is an ironic riff on the idea of the perfect mother and the nuclear family inspired by DW Winnicott’s phrase, ‘good enough mother’,” Katri says. “It wasn’t intended to appeal directly to any one particular group over another – other than hoping that the narrative suspense would keep people reading who might otherwise find the material too dark, or too layered in a literary sense. I think it’s up to each reader to have their own experience of the novel. For me, the moment it was published, it became about those who bought and read and talked to each other about it – it’s not about me. I think this is the enormous value of book clubs.” l

LOOK OUT FOR THE CAMBRIDGE EDITION BOOK CLUB STICKERS IN HEFFERS AND GET MONEY OFF OUR MONTHLY PICK

Heffers is located at 20 Trinity Street, Cambridge. blackwells.co.uk

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CATHY MOORE , DI RECTOR OF CAMBRIDGE L I TERARY FEST IVAL , ON A PERFECT MOTHER This is a highly accomplished first novel, with a compelling story that explores relationships, love, parenting, violence and legacy, all set against the uncertainty of whether a crime has been committed. It beautifully evokes Trieste, with all its cultural and political complexities, as well as the sense that everything is at a crossroads – much like the history of Trieste itself. The novel is narrated by Jacob, who visits Trieste to research his long-lost great-grandfather. There, he meets Charlotte and Jane and begins a relationship with one and forms a friendship with the other. For me, the joy of A Perfect Mother is as much to be found in the haunting plot and sense of place as it is about the precise, mature and clear-eyed prose style that would suggest a writer at the peak of their career and not, as is the case, a debut novelist.

COMING SOON! CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL

A highlight of the local calendar for book lovers, Cambridge Literary Festival returns for its spring outing from 5-7 April. As ever, the line-up offers diversity of speakers – from the hottest novelists to political commentators, activists, thinkers, entertainers and children’s authors. Names already confirmed include Labour Party MP Hilary Benn, The Times columnist and former speech writer for Tony Blair, Phil Collins, and a brilliant array of fiction writers that includes John Lanchester, Ali Smith, Madeline Miller and Simon Mayo. Not to mention a constellation of scientists, such as the Astronomer Royal, Sir Martin Rees, Adam Rutherford and Giles Yeo. Booking opens on 5 February. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

UP NEXT MONTH CIRCE BY MADELINE MILLER Escape to an ancient land of gods, heroes, magic and monsters with next month’s book club pick: Circe by Madeline Miller. The latest offering from the award-winning author of The Song of Achilles is a powerful story about the goddess Circe. The novel takes readers to the house of Helios, god of the sun, where a daughter is born – but Circe has neither the look nor the voice of divinity and is scorned and rejected by her kin. Isolated, she turns to mortals for companionship, leading her to discover a power forbidden to the gods: witchcraft. When love drives Circe to cast a dark spell, Zeus banishes her to the remote island of Aiaia, where she learns to harness her occult craft. There is danger for a solitary woman in this world and Circe’s independence draws the wrath of men and gods alike. To protect what she holds dear, Circe must decide whether she belongs with the deities she was born from, or the mortals she has come to love...

CIRCE CAN BE PURCHASED FOR £16.99 IN HARDBACK. READ ALONG AND TWEET US YOUR THOUGHTS @CAMBSEDITION, WITH THE HASHTAG #EDITIONBOOKCLUB FOR A CHANCE TO FEATURE IN THE NEXT ISSUE.

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After Hours THE NIGHTLIFE EVENTS NOT TO MISS THIS MONTH

NEON MOON CLUB CIRQUE Throw away your inhibitions and leap into the glamorous world of the Neon Moon club next month when Club Cirque arrives on 2 March. As usual with this flamboyant burlesque and cabaret club, you can expect dazzling performers, a night of dancing to intoxicating tunes and plenty of incredible outfits to feast your eyes upon. The crowd helps make the party and always look sensational; join the fun and unleash your inner pin-up, vintage starlet, cyber punk, rockabilly, circus freak or cosplay queen, then dance the night away to retro tunes with a modern flavour. The event runs from 9pm to 3am and early bird tickets are available starting at £22.50. junction.co.uk

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NOW BOOKING

KT TUNSTALL 14 MAR, JUNCTION, £27.50 Following the release of her sixth album Wax at the tail end of 2018, Scottish singer-songwriter KT Tunstall heads out on the road, stopping in Cambridge in spring.

HOT 8 BRASS BAND A riot of screaming trumpets and roaring horns will reverberate around Cambridge Junction this month when the Hot 8 Brass Band touch down on 19 February. Hailing from the rich musical landscape of New Orleans, this popular band are known for their boundless energy and raw, funky sound. They combine elements of a traditional marching brass band with hip hop, funk and jazz, and are known for covers of tracks like Snoop Dogg’s What’s My Name and The Temptations’ Papa Was A Rolling Stone . Most famous of all is their joyous take on Marvin Gaye’s Sexual Healing , which was the track responsible for getting their name out and securing them a record deal. They always put on a great show, and you can join the fun for £20 per ticket. junction.co.uk

TOM WALKER 2 MAY, CORN EX, £20.50 A huge voice and minimalist, rap-style production have earned TomWalker an army of fans – catch him in Cambridge performing tracks including Leave a Light On in May.

SPOONFED RE TURNS Cambridge’s legendary drum and bass night Spoonfed returns this month, bringing a line-up of genre heavyweights to Fez Club on 7 February. The brainchild of local producer and DJ Logistics, aka Matt Gresham, and his older brother Dan (Nu:Tone), together with Saikon & In:Most, the night runs from 10pm until 3am and offers a chance to see some of the biggest names in DnB in an intimate setting. This month’s special guest is SpectraSoul. Snap up a third release ticket for £8.50. fixr.co

JOHN GR ANT John Grant, known to shop at Mill Road’s Relevant Record Cafe when he’s been in town in the past, returns to play the Corn Exchange on 7 February. His latest album Love is Magic captures, says Grant, the closest sound yet to how he wants his records to be. His inventive, heartfelt, sometimes whimsical lyrics, mixed with a range of musical styles, have made him a must-see for many. Tickets from £28. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

J IMMY CARR 7 JULY, CORN EX, £32.50 The sharp-tongued comedian is back in Cambridge for more witty one-liners and close-to- the-bone gags as part of his Terribly Funny tour, which also returns in December.

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A t the Blue Moon this month you’ll find the unusual line-up of two singing drummers. It sounds like it can’t be done, but Rattles, performing on the 1st, use the limitations of their arrangement to create pieces of intertwined, flowing, textural percussion, while threading sublime melodies through the gaps. The same venue also sees the return of Cambridge’s eclectic night of electronic music, Theo Sayers & Friends on the 15th with COIN OP headlining and hosts History & Lore on the 23rd. Our top Blue Moon pick, however, comes courtesy of Leeds noise-rock and DIY linchpins Bilge Pimp, who released their first record ten years ago. They will be performing on the 21st. ...And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead are one of the best live bands we’ve seen, and they return to the UK this month to celebrate 20 years since the release of their seminal sophomore album, Madonna . The band is performing it in full, alongside a host of songs from their other studio albums, at Storey’s Field Centre on the 10th. After a gap of ten years since their last album ( Varshons , released in 2009), alt-rockers The Lemonheads perform at the Junction on the 14th, in support of their new album Varshons 2 . Like Varshons , the new record is dedicated to covers. The same venue hosts White Lies on the 13th, who are celebrating an entire decade as a band. They return with their new album, Five , and a headline tour to flaunt it on. The record sees the indie trio reaching new creative heights that’s bolder and more complex than previous efforts, and sure to cement their status as one of the most important bands on the scene. Canadian hardcore legends Cancer Bats (7th) and New Orleans street brass legends Hot 8 Brass Band (19th) complete our Junction recommendations. Our Portland Arms tip this month is Kevin Krauter on the 11th. An insightful songwriter with a lyrical style that is both economical and evocative, Krauter crafts unique soundscapes that scramble a range of influences: 1960s flower pop, 1970s easy listening, 1980s New Wave, 1990s alt-radio and 2000s indie rock. Also at Portland this month are John Smith on the 1st, Kris Barras on the 13th, Kulk on the 16th and Sean McGowan on the 20th. Always popular in Cambridge, John Grant Gig Guide JORDAN WORLAND FROM LOCAL MUSIC WEBSITE SLATE THE DISCO GIVES HIS TOP LIVE MUSIC PICKS FOR THE MONTH AHEAD

TR ANSATL ANT IC SESSIONS

A tonic for the bleak days of winter, Transatlantic Sessions is serving up a soul-warming evening of exquisite folk music on 6 February. Celebrating the unique connections between Celtic and US musical traditions, this touring concert features an ever-changing line-up of special guests playing together with back-porch informality. Nearly 25 years on from the original TV series, screened on the BBC, the live show has become an eagerly anticipated annual highlight of many folk fans’ musical calendar. The setlists are chosen by guest performers, with solo and ensemble instrumentals from the programme’s joint musical directors, Scottish fiddler Aly Bain and Nashville legend Jerry Douglas, and their long-serving eight-man house band featuring Russ Barenberg, Phil Cunningham, John Doyle, Michael McGoldrick, John McCusker, Donald Shaw, Danny Thompson and James Mackintosh. The guests for 2019 include AMA award-winning Gretchen Peters and the great TimO’Brien, whose new release, Where the River Meets the Road , covers songwriters from his native West Virginia. Also on the line-up is Californian wunderkind Molly Tuttle, who at 25 years old was crowned the first-ever female International Bluegrass Music Awards Guitar Player of the Year, plus won Song of the Year at the International Folk Music Awards 2018 – all before releasing her debut album. Celtic voices among the line-up include the peerless Cara Dillon and Scotland’s own Paul McKenna, considered to be one of the finest young singer-songwriters on the scene. Tickets for the show are £24-£32. cornex.co.uk

returns to the Corn Exchange on the 7th. Grant laces sumptuous soft-rock ballads with an array of spacey, wistful synthesiser sounds, increasingly adding taut, fizzing sequencers, nu-synth disco settings and icy soundscapes to the incredible sound mix.

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CAMBR IDGE CLUB ANNOUNCES ACTS A day of music, family entertainment, and tasty food and drink in the Cambridgeshire countryside, The Cambridge Club Festival returns on 16 June. Taking place at Haggis Farm, this one-day festival is now entering its third year and will feature over 20 artists across two stages, ranging from bonafide legends to up-and-coming local talent. Headlining are disco queens Sister Sledge, the sibling hitmakers responsible for He’s The Greatest Dancer , We Are Family , Lost in Music and Thinking of You . They will be joined by Cambridge Club Festival returnee Craig Charles, who will bring his much-loved Funk & Soul Club show featuring 70s grooves, vintage soul and brand new beats. Uncle Funk & The Boogie Wonderband, Swagger and JJ Rossa will also be doing their thing on the main stage, while on the second stage, guests will be treated to performances fromGeorgia and the Vintage Youth, The Trials of Kato, Woodley Taylor and more. As well as plenty of top tunes throughout the day, there will be a kids’ entertainment tent and a whopping selection of local food and drinks vendors serving everything from boutique spirits and craft ales to jerk chicken and tasty vegan treats. Tickets are available for £25. thecambridgeclub.co

NEWMARKET NIGHTS 2019

hit that has now been seen by more than five million fans across the globe. The show takes you on an electrifying visual and audio journey through Michael Jackson’s staggering musical career, paying homage to his live performances, innovative dance moves and revisiting hits including I Want You Back , ABC , Smooth Criminal , Bad , Thriller and many more. Rudimental, the genre-defying, Brit Award-winning band who burst onto the scene in 2013 with their debut album Home , will take to the stage on 26 July. Then, on 2 August, it’s over to dance music pioneer Pete Tong for a night of Ibiza classics, with live accompaniment provided by the

Enjoy a flutter on the horses followed by an evening of top live music at Newmarket Nights, which returns to the town’s racecourse this summer. Combining thrilling racing and A-list artists, who perform to the crowd as dusk falls, this series of concerts runs from June to August and will feature stars including Pete Tong and Rudimental for its 2019 outing. Up first, on 21 June, are Madness, one of Britain’s most treasured bands. Blending ska, reggae and pop, Suggs and co have delivered historic performances at events including the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee concert and at the London 2012 Olympic Games closing ceremony. Next up, on 19 July, it’s the turn of Thriller Live, the West End smash

Heritage Orchestra. thejockeyclub.co.uk

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ournalist and author Dolly Alderton is in Cambridge on 20 February as part of a UK-wide tour to mark the paperback release of her bestselling debut, Everything I Know About Love . Her wildly successful book is best described as a series of chronological essays, charting Dolly’s experiences from her early 20s through to almost 30, and includes her ever-evolving thoughts on friendship, love and growing up. There’s also laugh-out- loud sections on the horrors of event- organising group emails and a very reliable recipe for macaroni cheese, Hello DOLLY Though the live event is hooked on the themes of the book, it’s not directly about the book itself: “It’s more about us talking through the millennial female experience and growing up: it’s nostalgic and anecdotal, and looking to the future,” the author says. The audience is invited to ask questions, which again, tend to spin off into wider themes. “Most of that section [of the show] ends up being women looking for advice, which I often feel like I’m in no position – in terms of experience or expertise – to advise on. I think it feels like a really supportive space – Lauren and I try to set the tone of it being honest and irreverent, but also safe. It does turn into a bit of group therapy and the section often goes on for twice as long as you think it will, because women just aren’t really afforded space a lot of the time, where they’re allowed to talk about their experiences in a way that’s taken seriously and J EDITION CATCHES UP WITH BESTSELLING AUTHOR DOLLY ALDERTON AHEAD OF HER LIVE SHOW IN CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS which means the book, in short, wholeheartedly deserves a space on your bookshelf. Owners of the hardback copy may want to seek out the paperback for a new chapter, Everything I know at thirty , which Dolly describes as having been “a total joy” to put together. “I loved writing that chapter,” she says. “The thing uninterrupted. The rooms we’ve done those shows in have felt really magical: there’s normally thousands of women and one begrudging husband,” she laughs. One of the most appealing aspects of Everything I know about love is the honest documentation of both peaks

and pitfalls of the modern experience. “It’s the journey of a woman getting older and realising what’s important in life,” Dolly says. “It’s exposing the journey of self and growing up, and the mistakes we make, and the things that we come to realise are what matters, and the things that don’t – and that means there are going to be uncomfortable chapters. I’m against the idea that when women are on the page or screen they have to be bastions of puritanism, and always behave in this exemplary, compassionate, well-mannered and beautiful way – that’s just not how life goes. I don’t know any 21 year old that

that no one tells you is that you write a book because you love writing, and then you publish a book and you’re basically not allowed to write, because you’re doing Woman’s Hour, or interviews with charming journalists from Cambridge, or you’re doing tours, or promotion – and all these opportunities come up that are nothing to do with writing. It amazes me how little of my life I spend writing now: I feel like every day, my life is a battle to push stuff back so that I can do what I love doing, what makes me happy, which is writing.” Dolly finished writing her book two years ago, and now feels as though it’s

“It does turn into a bit of group therapy”

wasn’t a bit of a twat.” Dolly continues: “With women, we always talk about transgressions as evidence of poor morality or self- indulgence, but what we don’t leave room for is what we leave so much room for when we’re talking about male flâneurs or anarchists or bon viveurs. “First of all, life is really hard, and life is difficult when you go from childhood to adulthood, and you have to face the reality of what this experience is going to be until the day you die, and the way a lot of us cope with that is in oblivion. If you’re not an addict and you’re not harming

from a different life. “I think that’s just the nature of your 20s: it feels like dog years, to borrow a metaphor from Nora Ephron,” she says. “The difference between a 21 year old and a 26 year old is just enormous. I already feel like I would have written it so differently. I’m still so proud of the book, of course, but it just feels like such a long time ago. I got the [paperback] proofs through and it’s like a different woman’s writing this new final chapter.” When she comes to Cambridge, Dolly will be sharing the Corn Exchange’s stage with writer and director Lauren Bensted, her best friend and former teenage bandmate.

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