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Springing to life

EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459

raditionally, May is the month when (what feels like) the entire population of Cambridge swarms to Jesus Green, to relax on the grass with a pint at our city’s beloved beer festival. Sadly, for a multitude of reasons, the event is unable to take place this year – but for anyone hankering for a hoppy fix, we’ve got news of another booze-fuelled celebration. A collaboration between a handful of favourite watering holes, the Cambridge Beer Quarter presents a perfect excuse for a pub crawl: we find out more and hear from some local brewers making a splash on page 47. Also inside this issue, in celebration of the national Love Your Local Market initiative (13 May to 5 June), we tour the city’s stalls, discovering a fascinating history and, sadly, uncertain future for the traders. We take a deep dive into the city’s cultural scene, too, unearthing plenty of wondrous goings on – from wild card theatre to a bold, bright and beautiful new club night for the queer community. There’s comedy from Patrick Kielty – who tells us why he’s back for his first tour in seven years – on page 41, plus a chat with Jesterlarf founder Andy White, who shares his highs and lows from two decades of bringing laughter to the city (page 25). And don’t miss our interview with legendary local songsmiths Kimberley Rew and Lee Cave-Berry, who explain how they’re keeping the spirit of rock and roll alive right here in Cambridge, on page 37. From street parties to foodie highlights, there’s plenty more to explore and enjoy – see you next month!

Cambridge Edition Magazine Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area. nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Assistant editor Miriam Balanescu Editorial assistant Alex Fice Editorial director Roger Payne Chief sub editor Alex Bell Sub editors MatthewWinney & Harriet Williams ADVERTISING Sales director Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Hannah Gurney 01223 499463 hannahgurney@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Mark Box, Matt Hodgson, Anna Taylor & Elisha Young DESIGN & PRODUCTION Senior designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden &Matt Pluck

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Contents

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04 Starters Our favourite Instagram pics of the month, plus brilliant buys from local indies 07 Culture Club Gigs, exhibitions, great days out and portraits of some colourful Cambridge characters 25 Jesterlarf at 20 We meet talent-spotter extraordinaire and comedy club founder, Andy White 26 On the Box Highlights from the big and small screen, plus a chat with local lad and film star Jonathan Rhodes 29 Festival Guide After a few quiet years, the festival scene is back with a bang – find out what’s in store! 37 The Cambridge Sound Kimberley Rew and Lee Cave-Berry talk music, stardom and cats

39 Lovely Jubilee Ready for a right royal knees-up? We’ve got the lowdown on the best Jubilee parties in town 41 Crossing the Line Ahead of his Cambridge visit, comedian Patrick Kielty discusses his politically charged new show 45 Food &Drink Wine tips, the rooftop spot you don’t want to miss, plus a pint with some Cambridge brewers 55 Love Your Local Market Discover the market ’s unique offering, current inhabitants and deep-seated legacy 61Walk on theWild Side We meet the cute critters and fantastic beasts of Shepreth Wildlife Park 63 Home Edition Kitchen inspo, tips for making your home more eco-friendly and this month ’s garden guide

Cover illustration by Hedzlynn Kamaruzzaman, junior designer at Bright Publishing.

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THIS MONTH’S MUST-HAVES FROM LOCAL INDIES

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1. Play all day artwork, £25, Angela Reed Need a reminder not to take life so seriously? This cute canvas print by Nicola Evans will do just the job! 2. Bardenas Night clutch bag, £44.99, Manor Gift Shop A watercolour clutch bag to bring a touch of spring to your style this May 3. The Lia midi dress, £75, Lilac Rose A floral dress is a spring essential – and this silky number by Hope & Ivy is a sure-fire winner 4. California Bank magnet, £3.50, Curating Cambridge Part of the Hockney’s Eye range, to coincide with the major new exhibition at The FitzwilliamMuseum, you can pick up the fridge magnet from online shop Curating Cambridge 5. Weekend bag, £42, Ark Stylish and functional, this coral-coloured cotton bag has plenty of room for stowing your staycation essentials 6. Naked Clay Ceramics porcelain regular mug, £40, Kettle’s Yard This brand makes gorgeous ceramics, inspired by the colours and textures of the natural world – like this minimalist mug in buttercream and peach 7. Vase, £POA, Cambridge Contemporary Art Trinity Street’s Cambridge Contemporary Art brims with fabulous pieces, including a number by Cornwall-based ceramicist, Craig Underhill

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Culture Club

HIGHLIGHTS Towering talent POLITICAL ART, THRILLING THEATRE,

ECLECTIC MUSIC & MORE THIS MAY

CASCADING COLLEGES

Matthew Ellwood’s intricate depiction of iconic Cambridge colleges is a feast for the eyes – find out more on page 14

© MATTHEW ELLWOOD

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CULTURE CLUB Arts & Culture THE MUST-SEE EVENTS AROUND CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH

SHOWS TO INSPIRE

FAMILY FUN AT CAMBRIDGE JUNCTION Experience an innovative retelling of classic tales like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory , The BFG and The Twits through performance, games and creative play in the thrilling interactive theatre experience, Roald Dahl and the Imagination Seekers on 8 May. On 15 May, discover Indian storytelling, dance and shadow puppetry with Apple ‘n’ Spice . Interactive and multicultural, it tells the story of two stepmothers – one from the East and one from the West – whose stories become entwined in a captivating story. Get lost in a world of pure imagination on 22 May with Mischief and Mystery in Moomin Valley . Young audiences will be enchanted by magical puppetry and an interactive play, with a pop-up book Moomin Valley set – a place buzzing with nature, where everyone is welcome and adventures await! junction.co.uk

3-4 MAY

Wild card NEW HORIZONS What’s life without a few surprises? This month, a handful of unorthodox shows are on the cards, offering thought-provoking and sometimes challenging performances that may take you out of your comfort zone, or lead you to discover something you fall in love with. Here are our top wild card options… Fault Lines Cambridge Junction, 3-4 May, 7.30pm A fashion show that shines a light on the tension between feminism and fabric. Five diverse performers take to the catwalk to parade fashions ranging from haute couture to bargain bin. As you watch, you’ll control the music and stories you listen to using an app on your mobile phone, allowing you to curate your own unique experience.

by Arthur Jeffes, who spent time exploring the Antarctic before settling down to make music, inspired by the vast, silent icy landscapes he encountered on his travels. Secret Cabaret Club The Town and Gown, 14 May, 7.30pm Step into the Secret Cabaret Club , where top-quality performers unite for a melting pot of entertainment. Your host will be the gloriously sassy Gloria Squeezers, who’ll guide you through a series of acts – ranging from burlesque artistes to singers and comedians. Showwomen Cambridge Junction, 17-18 May, 7.30pm Award-winning performance maker Marisa Carnesky is ready to address the untold herstory of British working-class entertainment, giving voice to immigrant, queer, activist and occult perspectives. Featuring performances by hairhanger and comedienne Fancy Chance, sword and spoken word artist Livia Kojo Alour and physical fire performer Lucifire, interspersed by interviews and archival footage.

Penguin Cafe Saffron Hall, 14 May, 8pm

Avant-pop band Penguin Cafe is known for creating stunning soundscapes through a distinctive combination of folk, classical and minimalist styles. The ensemble was founded

14 MAY

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Sword swallowing, thoughtful fashion and classic cabaret – there’s a riot of choice

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CULTURE CLUB

CAMBRIDGE NIGHTLIFE CLUB URANIA ALEX FICE ENTERS THE ORBIT OF CAMBRIDGE’S BOLD, BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL NEW CLUB NIGHT FOR THE QUEER COMMUNITY The cosmically named Club Urania first burst onto Cambridge’s nightlife scene back in

leave behind any expectations of gender or heteronormativity and make our own utopia.” Ema and fellow collaborators Rosie Cooper (director of Wysing Arts Centre), Celia Willoughby, Diarmuid Hester, Hannah Wallis, Chloe Page and Roeland van der Heiden have worked hard to capture the utopic atmosphere of Urania at their first three events. By combining arts and culture with music and dance, Club Urania provides a platform from which people can express themselves freely, in a welcoming setting. “We start with an open-mic slot, offering the opportunity for people to share their work, be it drag, poetry, or stand-up comedy – it’s a real open book.” This is then followed by two programmed performances organised by the Junction and Wysing Arts Centre. At February’s opening event, Wysing brought in Whiskey Chow, who subverted Yves Klein’s blue nudes by dipping the macho children’s toy Stretch Armstrong into blue syrup to make prints on a piece of paper, as footage of Yves Klein making his own prints was projected in the background. “While Club Urania provides a space for fun, silly, frivolous activity, it’s also for contemplative performance. I think it’s really important to have a night that incorporates both,” comments Ema. The evening concludes – as any good club night should – with a couple of hours of joyful, unbridled dancing to live music sets by local DJs – the perfect mixer for the cultured spirit of Club Urania’s opening acts.

February, the outcome of a meeting of minds between Cambridge Junction, Wysing Arts Centre and other local collaborators who had grown frustrated at the lack of queer spaces in Cambridge – despite the city’s liberal heritage. The night aims to provide a much-needed space for members of the LGBTQ+ community to express themselves through performance, reflective contemplation and dance. It builds on the legacy of The Dot Cotton Club, which paved the way for nights like this in the city and has been a staple of the scene for over 25 years. Urania’s ambition is to connect and uplift organisers all over the city to celebrate the creative queer community in Cambridge. Following the sell-out success of its first three events, Club Urania is now preparing to launch its biggest night yet, with an other-worldly extravaganza at the Junction’s main venue on 28 May. The event takes its name from the title of a pioneering feminist journal that ran from 1916 to 1940 called Urania , a publication that rejected traditional notions of gender, fought stereotypes and celebrated same-sex love. Club Urania offers the LGBTQ+ community a space in which to embody the spirit of Urania: “Often, queer people are going against the norms of how we are expected to operate in the world,” says Ema Boswood, arts producer at Cambridge Junction. “This celebrates that, where we

A PLACE TO BELONG Careful planning, personal passion and legacies of legends have all gone into the making of Club Urania

While curating a diverse line-up for each event has been key to establishing Club Urania, another important aspect has been to make the event as accessible as possible – from pay-what- you-feel tickets, to the provision of quiet spaces at the venue. For those who aren’t comfortable entering crowded venues right now, there’s the option to livestream the event from the comfort of your home. Live captions are also provided for both online and in-person events. For Club Urania collaborator Hannah Wallis, this is a significant step forward: “It’s something I would never have dreamed possible in a small club night like this one,” she says. “To have been able to instigate it and see in practice what it means to follow performances by artists I so admire, has blown me away.” As the Junction’s spring season draws to a close, it was vital to Club Urania’s organisers that it should go out with a bang, before taking a temporary pause over the summer. For the final night of the season, it will move from the smaller studio space into J1 – the Junction’s main venue, which has a capacity of up to 1,000 people. There will be performances by artist Harold Offeh and circus specialist Symoné, followed by a showcase of local DJs, plus a headline DJ set. Ultimately, Ema hopes it will provide a stimulating atmosphere in which LGBTQ+ people can gather and connect with a bunch of fellow queers and allies, while cementing Club Urania’s reputation as a welcoming queer venue. “We want people to picture this cool, other-worldly space where anything is possible, everyone is celebrated and accepted for their quirks and queerness – that they feel they can express themselves in whatever way they like,” she says. “We want that to be synonymous with Urania and the whole vibe of the night.” Follow Club Urania on Instagram to keep up to date. Tickets can be purchased from the Junction’s website. @cluburania | junction.co.uk

10 MAY 2022 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

CULTURE CLUB

JOANNE MCNALLY: THE PROSECCO EXPRESS 3 NOVEMBER, 8PM, CAMBRIDGE CORN EXCHANGE, £27 Having arrived at her 30s without securing a husband or birthing a child, Joanne McNally’s head is spinning with prosecco-fuelled questions. Not many answers, but plenty of laughs to be had.

SQUEEZE 28 OCTOBER, 7.30PM, CAMBRIDGE CORN EXCHANGE, £40.50

Join music legends Squeeze as they return on their first major UK tour in three years. They’ll be joined by Dr John Cooper Clarke, who’ll offer a medley of musings, zany humour and chit-chat.

THE CAMBRIDGE CLUB FESTIVAL 10-12 JUNE, CHILDERLEY ORCHARD, CAMBRIDGE, TICKET PRICES VARY

Dance the night away with legends such as Diana Ross, Gabrielle and Corinne Bailey Rae. Visit the auditorium of intrigue for comedy and podcasts, and get lost in The Party-Time Continuum.

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CULTURE CLUB

LOCAL THEATRE In the Limelight

true story traces the talented musician’s extraordinary journey to fame, from co- writing songs with husband Gerry Goffin, to becoming one of the most successful solo artists in the history of pop. Packed with classic hits like You’ve Got a Friend , (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman and The Loco-Motion , this uplifting journey is bound to be a hit! The Arts Theatre will also host inspiring talks frommuch-loved poet Lemn Sissay and national treasure Barry Humphries. On 22 May, hear Lemn Sissay share his moving life story in My Name is Why , featuring extracts from his Sunday Times bestselling memoir. He reflects on his experience of growing up in care and tackles issues such as race, family and the meaning of home, offering a stirring tribute to the redemptive power of creativity. On 31 May and 1 June, Humphries brings his revealing, riproarious show The Man Behind the Mask , sharing stories from his extraordinary life in theatre, from the hilarious to the heart-wrenching.

On 10 and 11 May, The Town and Gown brings us a thought-provoking production set in the Soviet Union at the height of the Space Race. Inspired by true events and untold stories, Tales from Star City follows Polina Semyenova as she reflects on her dreams of being part of the great communist movement, as Cold War tensions escalate to dramatic levels. Also at The Town and Gown, on 17 and 18 May is Somewhere to Belong , a quirky 60-minute piece of theatre that shines a light on the misconceptions surrounding bisexuality. It centres on CK, who finds herself unwittingly taking part in a strange and invasive game show, where she must complete humiliating tasks in a bid to win a grand prize. The play acts as a simile for sexuality, throwing light on hurtful perceptions of the bi+ community and inviting a celebration of queer voices. From 10 to 21 May at the Cambridge Arts Theatre, don’t miss the joyous and uplifting Beautiful – The Carole King Musical , the award-winning West End and Broadway show about the chart- topping music legend. This inspiring

22 MAY

Don’t Miss! ENJOY AMAZING AVIATION, GORGEOUS GARDENS & MAJESTIC MOUNTAINS THIS MAY

SPRING GARDEN TOUR 3 May, 10.30am, Cambridge University Botanic Garden, Friends £10 With spring in full swing at the Botanic Gardens, join this seasonal tour to dig deep into the secrets of the plant world. Sally Petitt, head of horticulture, will be your guide.

FLYING DAYS: VE DAY 7 May, 10am-6pm, IWM Duxford, £30

THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL 28 May, 7.30pm, Cambridge Corn Exchange, £15.50-£17.50 The world’s most prestigious mountain film festival returns for another round of gravity-defying feats.

Raise your eyes to the skies for a spectacular air show, commemorating the role of aviation and RAF Duxford in the fight for peace across Europe. Also, stop along for a classic street party!

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CULTURE CLUB

HAVE A BOOGIE

Musical May

LOSE YOURSELF TO DANCE, BE ENCHANTED BY THE ORCHESTRA AND BOP TO THE BEAT OF THE CITY’S THRIVING MUSIC SCENE

CLASSICAL The halls of Kettle’s Yard will be filled with instrumental ensemble concerts this month, as its 2021-22 Chamber Music Series draws to a close. On 5 May, pianist Melvyn Tan offers a repertoire spanning Schumann and Chopin to Ravel and Dove, while on 12 May, Solem Quartet performmusic by Mendelssohn and Beethoven, plus a new commission by David John Roche. On 19 May, there’s the chance to hear Fenella Humphreys, one of the UK’s most established violinists. Concluding the season on 26 May will be cellist Alexander Baillie and pianist Nigel Yandell, with music by Fauré, Ravel and Rebecca Clarke. At Saffron Hall on 8 May, Saffron Walden Symphony Orchestra presents a commission by young composer Lewis Edmunds. The orchestra will also play work by Rachmaninov and Tchaikovsky. On 29 May, Miloš offers an absorbing 90-minute set of classical guitar, with music by Fernando Sor, Bach, Heitor Villa-Lobos and more. Cambridge Philharmonic also returns to West Road Concert Hall on 21 May, for what promises to be an evening of sensational music by Libby Larsen, Jonathan Dove and Rachmaninov.

ECLECTIC MIX Whether you’re into folk, dubstep or Britpop, Cambridge Junction has something for everyone this month. On 5 May, fiddler Sam Sweeney takes the stage to stir emotions and revive English traditional music. Folk fans should check out The Grahams, a Nashville-based duo whose nostalgic and uplifting tunes are a comfort to the soul – catch them on 9 May. Ana Silvera celebrates the release of her new studio album, The Fabulist , with a concert on 10 May, where sweet melodies and poetic storytelling combine. Then, on 11 May, there’s Brothers Osborne, who meld country and rock to create a fresh sound. For a hit of pop, don’t miss Sleeper on 7 May – after a 20-year hibernation, they’re back to give us a dose of 90s nostalgia. On 12 May, Confidence Man is serving fearlessly self-assured tunes with sassy, tongue-in-cheek anthems on tap. For surreal, dreamlike musings in musical form, Will Varley’s concert on 14 May is sure to please; or for something a little off the wall, enter L’entourloop’s wonderfully unique universe on 22 May, where two inexhaustible seniors command the stage alongside great guests.

BIG HITS Cambridge is fortunate to welcome lots of major names to its stages every month, and May is no exception. The Junction hosts Peter Doherty on 20 May, who’ll be unveiling songs from his upcoming album, The Fantasy Life of Poetry & Crime – his most intimate and revealing work yet. On 23 May, there’s a chance to see soul singer and songwriter JP Cooper for the first time in three years, with songs from his highly anticipated second album, She . On 24 May, masters of Irish folk Dervish bring their spellbinding music to Cambridge for one of seven UK shows. They’ll showcase songs from an extensive back catalogue, including new arrangements from their latest critically acclaimed album. On 30 May, YouTube-made rapper KSI promises mind-blowing production and special guests, plus a chance to sample his latest work. Hot acts at the Corn Exchange this month include Neil Hannon, who’s touring top hits and fan favourites on 5 May, followed by Tony Hadley, celebrating 40 years in the business on 6 May. And don’t miss multi-platinum-selling vocal harmony group, The Overtones, on 30 May.

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT THE TOWER OF CAMBRIDGE COLLEGES Artist Matthew Ellwood has created a spectacular artwork depicting Cambridge Colleges piled up high in a Babel-like tower of brick and mortar, the latest in a series of intricate studies of cities and places around the UK. The Tower of Cambridge Colleges is a unique depiction of the rich array of architecture that comprises the University of Cambridge. Unlike previous projects, Matthew was unable to visit Cambridge during the research phase for the piece due to rapidly rising Covid-19 cases and the lingering threat of lockdown in the run up to last Christmas. Instead, he spent hours hunched over a laptop, roaming the streets of Cambridge and analysing the city’s most iconic college buildings on Google Earth. The final piece is a marvellous representation of some of the city’s best loved buildings in fine line pen, watercolour and gouache. Take a look on page 7! matthewellwood.com

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CULTURE CLUB

Art and politics WHAT LIES BENEATH UNRAVEL THE STORIES WOVEN INTO A SELECTION OF TEXTILES, CREATED BY WOMEN ACROSS THE GLOBE New Hall Art Collection’s latest exhibition, What Lies Beneath: Women, Politics, Textiles , on display at Murray Edwards College until late August, reveals how female textile makers and artists have used their craft to weave identity, construct a sense of community, and bring about political action in a range of contexts around the world. What Lies Beneath is a celebration of traditional crafts – from appliqué to knitting, quilting, rug-hooking, collage and fabric- painting. Skills that have been passed down from one generation of women to the next, frommother to daughter or in sewing groups. The works on display in this temporary exhibition speak of a rich heritage of textile making that has unfolded over centuries and across different continents. The exhibition includes pieces from the New Hall Art Collection by Miriam Schapiro, Permindar Kaur and Francisca Aninat, alongside major loans from artists and galleries. There are also contemporary textile works by Nengi Omuku, Anya Paintsil and Enam Gbewonyo, which fuse traditional and experimental techniques. Important works from the 20th century also feature, including Nicola L’s Nous Voulons Voir , taking the form of a political banner bearing the humorous, yet sinister slogan ‘we want to see’. There’s a quilt by Stella Mae Pettway of the Gee’s Bend Quiltmakers, a group of women in a remote African American community in Alabama that make quilts, often for practical purposes, but which hold exceptional beauty. FABRIC OF THE COMMUNITY The exhibition helps show the significance of traditionally female craft, celebrating the often unappreciated skills of women

ALL IMAGES © WILF SPELLER

WORKS OFFER COMMENTARY ON SOCIETY IN ITS VARIOUS FORMS

she explains. “This same form of resistance exists now within online and social media culture. When everything is mass-produced and commoditised, people want to get back to doing things with their hands. Women are consciously choosing to align themselves within a history of female labour and skill.” What Lies Beneath offers the opportunity to unpick aspects of history, politics and cultural identity from a distinctly female perspective, tracing back threads through time and place and from generation to generation. The exhibition occupies the Lower Fountain Court of Murray Edwards College and is open to the public from 10am to 6pm, every day of the week. To find out more, or to take the virtual tour, visit art.newhall.cam.ac.uk.

The works offer a commentary on society in its various forms, from identity to politics, encompassing issues such as gender, race and class. For example, The Tejedoras de Mampuján, winners of the Colombian National Peace Prize, document human rights abuses through collaboratively sewed pieces, while Anya Paintsil aims to elevate craft-based practices associated with women of colour and working-class women. Textiles have been used as a covert form of activism and protest, centuries before women had a public political voice, says curator Naomi Polonsky. “In the 1970s, embroidery and knitting were central to second-wave feminism’s takedown of traditional, male-dominated art institutions. A couple of decades later – in the 1990s – ‘craftivism’ (craft activism) emerged out of the protests against globalisation and capitalism,”

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BACKSTAGE

A Real Catch MYSTERY MOMENT MIRIAM BALANESCU MEETS THE CAST OF CATCH ME IF YOU CAN, THE CAMBRIDGE ARTS THEATRE’S LATEST PRODUCTION

ew theatre actors are bestowed with the honour of projects custom-made for them. But Patrick Duffy, renowned for his

23-28 MAY

role in global hit Dallas , and Linda Purl, whose appearances range from The Office to Happy Days , star in a new show tailored specifically for the two. “We discovered that we had a mutual friend in Bill Kenwright, a remarkable impresario and theatre producer running Everton Football Club,” Linda says. “Bill had been a mentor to my son when he was playing football in the UK – so he has a godfather status in our household.” When they sent Bill a photo of themselves, a stroke of foresight drove him to create a project for the couple – prior to them getting together in 2020. Trusting Bill completely, they agreed to star in Catch Me If You Can – a show touring the UK over 144 nights – before even reading the script. Set in the 60s, it’s adapted from Robert Thomas’ Trap for a Lonely Man , in which an argument erupts between a husband and wife isolated in the Catskills. She storms off, but on returning, her husband no longer recognises her. After arriving in London, the cast was struck down with Covid-19, forcing them to miss almost a week of rehearsal. The rest went ahead over Zoom. “We would do the whole play in our kitchen with [Scottish actor] Gray O’Brien in his living room, walking around, pretending we were on-set. We had to rehearse every day, no matter what,” Patrick recalls. Getting out on the road has been their highlight. “They were boisterous in Belfast,” says Linda. “They were contemplative in Cardiff; rowdy in Blackpool; in Darlington, they were sophisticated.” “It fits very well in the UK,” Patrick explains. “It is almost a non-entity in American theatre, with a flavour of Agatha Christie.” The play deftly balances humour with intrigue. “We’re having new revelations about the characters on a nightly basis,” Linda says. “Now that we have been on the road together and done as many performances as we have, we are all breathing as one.” “There’s not a single character that’s who they appear to be,” Patrick continues.

DON’T MISS The 25 May show will have a sign language interpreter

ALL IMAGES © JACK MERRIMAN

I’m in love with, and someone who I’m trying to figure out.” For Patrick, fellow cast member Gray (Inspector Levine) is a kindred spirit: “We share a very exclusive membership card, with him being so identified on Coronation Street . I understand we’re dealing in the same way with what the audience sees, how much we try to be different from previous roles and whether it’s part of who we are. That gives me a feeling of brotherhood with him.” Since the screen is more familiar territory for both, the duo are enjoying the feel of theatre. Backstage giggles and theatrical blunders go hand in hand with the play’s quips: one performance saw a prop-gun malfunction, triggering protocols which forced Patrick to leave the stage, while Linda remained. “I fluffed the pillows, watered the plants, and after a while decided to break the fourth wall and say: ‘Guys, this is live theatre, we’ve had a little mishap.’” Every performance so far has been marked with standing ovations. The pair think it’s down to rejoicing theatre’s return. A note sent backstage said: ‘Thank you for letting us forget about the world for two hours and making us laugh.’ Catch Me If You Can will run at the Cambridge Arts Theatre from 23 to 28 May

“We have every type of actor in this show – film, stage and television – each bringing a different approach. We trust each other to the point that there is such flexibility in our portrayals. Whichever way the wind blows onstage, you just go with it.” Being a couple in real life added an extra dimension to their off-kilter husband and wife personas. “We come to work holding hands, being lovey-dovey,” says Patrick. “The curtain comes up, then we’re like fire and water for an hour and a half. The curtain call is when we get to hold hands again and wave to the crowd. It’s so much fun to look into the eyes of a person onstage and see two people: the woman

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STREET STYLE

Cambridge PHOTOGRAPHER MARK BOX SHARES SOME OF HIS FAVOURITE PORTRAITS FROM THE STREETS OF CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH – CAN YOU SPOT ANYONE YOU KNOW?

This is @noah_palombo and their significant other @atalantash, two super awesome, bright and colourful humans!

Humans of Cambridge is an Instagram photoblog by local photographer Mark Box. It began as a ABOUT THE PROJECT lockdown project and has turned into a sensation, featuring an ever-growing number of Cambridge’s colourful characters on the @humanofcambridge grid. Mark is out most days snapping, and can usually be found in the Market Square, on King’s Parade, Burrell’s Walk and Garret Hostel Bridge – your best bet for being papped is to head out around lunchtime wearing something suitably eye-catching!

Je suis Charli!

What an exquisite and modern take on a 60s outfit, worn beautifully by this colourful human.

20 MAY 2022

STREET STYLE

Say hello to Daisy and Sam. Together, they are a beautiful partnership, and equally very talented artists when it comes to photography! Give them a follow, and you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the gorgeous aesthetic of the layout and imagery: @daisyduked and @smadz_ .

When you’re having a green day. I loved this human’s outfit, and their personality was just as much fun – such good vibes!

A truly beautiful human!

Love, love, love this look! Bright pinks, animal print and vibrant reds... it just works!

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ADVERT I SEMENT FEATURE

20 May ENCANTO GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE 24 June THE CROODS 2: A NEW AGE SPIDER-MAN: NOWAY HOME 22 July SPACE JAM: A NEW LEGACY BACK TO THE FUTURE 19 August CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG WEST SIDE STORY (2021 VERSION)

FREE OUTDOOR FILM SCREENINGS

A MOMENT LIKE THIS Nothing brings people together quite like a good show

opcorn at the ready, Cambridge BID’s alfresco cinema returns to the Market Square this summer. In their fourth year, these beloved

summer events animate a usually quiet, unused space at night, bringing it to life with a family-friendly evening of fun. This year, the programme of free films is set to delight all ages, with double screenings in May, June, July and August. Starting from 6pm each evening, two crowd-pleasers will brighten the square. With both classics and fresh hits, there is something for everyone! The season starts on 20 May, with an Encanto and Ghostbusters: Afterlife double-header.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK MAY 2022 23

ANNI VERSARY SPECIAL

Jesterlarf at 20 ONE OF CAMBRIDGE’S BEST-LOVED COMEDY CLUBS CELEBRATES TWO DECADES WITH A BRILLIANT BIRTHDAY SHOW THIS MAY CAMBRIDGE COMEDY

edge off.” He then went on stage and blew the roof off – that’s professionalism for you! And thirdly, we used to run a night called Off The Wall at the Boathouse pub in Cambridge, which was for alternative, wacky acts. One evening, this little old lady turned up; off stage she was delightful, but on stage she was mad as a box of frogs! Turns out she was one of the country’s top criminal forensic scientists who worked on heinous murder cases. HAVE THERE BEEN ANY LOW POINTS FOR YOU? Fortunately there haven’t been too many, but one low that turned into a high was at an horrendous corporate event in some swanky hotel. The audience hated the closing headline act and the CEO kept heckling and doing his own awful jokes… obviously the act destroyed him, but the gasps of disgust were palpable. The performer did his stage time, returned to the dressing room and wanted to get away as quickly as possible. However, the only way out was through the room where

the audience sat. But then he spotted a dumb waiter lift. It was a real squeeze, but he just managed to fit, so we sent him up to the second floor – only imagine his horror when he arrived to discover that the audience had moved from the comedy room to the breakout room on the second floor, for champagne and nibbles! WHAT CAN PEOPLE EXPECT FROM THE ANNIVERSARY SHOW? It’s going to be a cracker. Tom Davis is stepping back into stand-up comedy after a few years away to concentrate on hit FROM THE GROUND UP Andy’s hard work has really paid off, with Jesterlarf becoming a staple of the UK comedy scene

ack in 2002, fed up with factory jobs and site lackey work, Andy White decided to book out his old school in St Neots and put on a

comedy night, featuring little-known acts ready to make a name for themselves on the comedy circuit. The evening included stand-up from Russell Howard and Gary Delaney, and was such a success that the audience drank the bar dry! This gave Andy the nudge he needed to become a full-time comedy promoter. He started Jesterlarf ’s Cambridge club two months later at the Grad Pad on Mill Lane, where it stayed until 2007, before moving to the Junction J2. Flash forward 20 years and Jesterlarf is still filling the venue with laughter. Ahead of its 20th anniversary show this month, we caught up with Andy to share his memories from over the years. WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF THE FUNNIEST MOMENTS SINCE JESTERLARF STARTED? There’s been a lot, but three stick out for me. Firstly, an 18-year-old Kevin Bridges did a ten-minute open spot that stretched to 30 as he was so funny – everyone in the room could’ve listened to him all night. Secondly, when my headliner for a sold-out Stevenage gig never showed, I had to call in a hungover Micky Flanagan on his night off. When he arrived, he said, “Andy, get me two pints of Stella Artois to take the

BBC show King Gary . He’s invited top comedians, with Geoff Norcott and Suzi Ruffell doing a rare club set, now that they are established theatre-filling acts. We’ve also got two brilliant new performers – Dinesh Nathan and Joseph Emslie – who have won a host of awards. Book tickets now for the anniversary show on 21 May, at jesterlarf.com I HAD TO CALL A HUNGOVER MICKY FLANAGAN

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK MAY 2022 25

SCREEN T IME

FROM THE SMALL TO BIG SCREEN, HERE ARE YOUR APRIL ON-SCREEN ESSENTIALS ON THE BOX

A Class Act LOCAL HERO WITH ROLES IN BELGRAVIA AND THE CROWN UNDER HIS BELT, JONATHAN RHODES LOOKS FORWARD TO LEARNING EVEN MORE, HE TELLS MIRIAM BALANESCU

I first started, I’d be so keen and full of collaborative instincts that I would bring to working with independent filmmakers. It makes me hungry for more. “I spent four hours improvising with Richard Gere,” Jonathan continues. “We found all the comedy in the scene that wasn’t there. There was a wonderful moment when the director came over to shape the scene and Richard just put his hand out and said: ‘We’re actors, let us play.’ I was like: ‘Oh, he means me.’” From Life’s Too Short, co-directed by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, to The Crown , Jonathan has had a myriad of experiences. “ The Crown was a behemoth. One of my days on that, we were on location at a huge building in Holborn and there were 100 extras, period vehicles and a punch that had to be managed.” Together with Nick Scott, whom he met in 2007 at the Berlinale International Film Festival, Jonathan has worked on several of his own projects – Big Society follows a war veteran with an unhealthy obsession with littering, while School Portrait is about a begrudging photographer. “You put a pompous, straight character in a situation where the rug is pulled from under his feet, and the comedy is in his downfall. That’s the kind of character I naturally play very well.” Jonathan’s first television role on children’s hit M.I. High had a comedic bent, although he didn’t take it any less seriously. “It was all pretty high stakes, undercut by silly moments, of course, like running into a pile of manure. All the crew were just as committed to shooting that as any adult programming. “Having funny bones gives your drama work a certain edge,” he says of his upcoming appearance on Stonehouse with Matthew MacFadyen, with whom he has much in common. “He’s my age, grew up in Norfolk and we both have a son called Ralph. We were like: ‘Nobody’s called Ralph – wow!’” Proving there’s always more to learn, Jonathan has started going back to acting workshops: “That’s kept me sharp. I often feel like I’m at the beginning of my journey, even though I’m 22 years in.”

rowing up in St Ives, Jonathan Rhodes, an actor who has bagged parts in big-set productions – among them Breaking the Bank,

Misbehaviour and MotherFatherSon – began his career relatively clueless. He knew that theatre was his passion, but didn’t know where to take it: “I thought – this is where it’s at, but none of my family are in the business at all.” Jonathan enrolled at Dartington College of Arts, followed by a master’s in Birmingham. “The industry was this huge monster that I didn’t know how to navigate,” he says. Forced to throw himself into it, over ten years he worked on 35 shorts and 18 independent features, while working in events and hospitality. It was after this period of honing his craft that Jonathan broke into bigger shows. “I discovered very quickly I am a creature of set,” he says. “I love everything about it, how things materialise out of chaos. All the preparation that you’ve done as an actor can get condensed down to five minutes if they run behind – so learning how to save energy is important.” Jonathan has recently worked as a day- player on multiple grand-scale productions. “The time they allocate to your character is done in one or two days,” he explains. “You’re exposed to the top end of the industry, but you’re in and out. When

SCREEN AND STAGE With 22 years in the acting business, Jonathan has experience of multiple platforms, across TV, film and theatre – from big-budget hits to indie shoots

26 MAY 2022 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

SCREEN T IME

After the rampant success of Normal People last year, another Sally Rooney adaptation arrives this summer. Where toWatch: BBC Three and Hulu When: May, release date TBC CONVERSATIONS WITH FRIENDS

ELIZABETH: A PORTRAIT IN PARTS

Roger Michell’s posthumous film picks apart the longest-reigning British monarch’s rule. Where toWatch: In cinemas and on Amazon Prime When: 3 June

STRANGER THINGS Everyone’s favourite 80s-set sci-fi returns, as a group of high- schoolers handle the fallout of the previous season’s battle. Where toWatch: Netflix | When: May 27 Racking up an impressive number of awards, this is a poignant study of the criminalisation of love. Where toWatch: Mubi | When: May 6 GREAT FREEDOM

Cambridge jazz musician Robin Phillips heads out on the road, from Chicago to New Orleans, in this documentary filmed by Domininkas Zalys. Where toWatch: YouTube, available now BACK TO THE SOURCE

Picturehouse Picks FROM A SEASON PRESENTED BY GASPAR NOÉ TO THEATRE FIRSTS, THERE’S LOTS TO LOOK FORWARD TO AT THE PICTUREHOUSE THIS MONTH GASPAR NOÉ PRESENTS: BIRD WITH THE VAMPYR 90TH ANNIVERSARY Celebrate nine decades of

THIS MUCH I KNOW TO BE TRUE Andrew Dominiks follows in the footsteps of his last Nick Cave feature, One More Time with Feeling. The film captures Nick Cave and Warren Ellis’ exceptional creative relationship, as they form their albums. May 11, 8.30pm

NT LIVE: STRAIGHT LINE CRAZY Spearheaded by Ralph Fiennes as Robert Moses, David Hare’s play deconstructs the concept of democracy in a New York setting. Broadcast live from the Bridge Theatre in London and directed by Nicholas Hytner. May 26, 7pm

CRYSTAL PLUMAGE As part of a new season, ‘Culture Shock’, Gaspar Noé unveils films that fed into his own latest, Vortex , starting off with Dario Argento’s gem. May 16, 8.30pm

Carl Theodor Dreyer’s creepy, spine-tingling, black and white classic. A traveller arrives at a countryside inn – and is pulled into a mystery that crosses the realms of the living and dead. May 22, 3pm

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK MAY 2022 27

PARTY SEASON

The Ultimate

RED ROOSTER 2-4 JUNE

With a Grammy award- winner, Cedric Burnside, on the roster, and Seasick Steve, Nick Waterhouse and Sugaray Rayford in tow, head here for a taste of cajun, soul and rock ‘n’ roll.

FROM FOLK SHINDIGS TO POP PARTIES, THERE’S SURE TO BE AN EVENT FOR EVERYONE THIS SUMMER

28-31 JULY

ST NEOTS FOLK FESTIVAL 10-12 JUNE

Showcasing the best of St Neots’ local artists and venues, Spiers & Boden and Gaelforce headline at this fiddle-fuelled event that will leave you reeling. Saturday also hosts a Day of Dance, with traditional Morris troupes.

Cambridge Folk Festival This behemoth of the international folk scene goes from strength to strength, bringing an ever-more impressive line-up of talent to its picturesque setting of Cherry Hinton Hall. This year’s bill is typically diverse, featuring names like Suzanne Vega, Gypsy Kings and Billy Bragg, as well as a host of local acts. This is the Kit – with an irresistible, folk-infused sound and captivating lyricism – promise to be a highlight. As frontwoman Kate Stables explains, part of their music’s appeal lies in how open it is to interpretation. “The way I write is quite collage-y – very rarely does it happen that I write a song about one thing,” she explains. “Words are this offering with a loose shape. It’s the listener or the reader who gets the final say. If everyone had the same experience with every

that out – because otherwise I’d be a hermit, not getting the musical benefits from people I love.” This also influences Kate’s choice of instrumentals: “There are a few horn players that I love so much, I want them to be on the album. Whatever they were playing, I would want them in the room.” Kate’s inspirations are as much literary as musical. Ursula K Le Guin has recently been a key muse. “I’ve got a big sack of words that I tip out over the floor and I have to find what’s linked to what,” she explains. “I search about on instruments to find musical bits that go with the words, or vice versa.” She adds: “You could say that this album has been in the making since the beginning of my brain.” Crossing genres, This is the Kit have paid a visit to Cambridge Folk Festival twice previously. “For me, the word folk just means people – folk music is just people music,” Kate says. “That’s its essence: the acknowledgement of each other.” On returning to live performance, she says: “It feels like when you’ve got to stop eating something to work out what impact it’s having. When you start again, you notice the effects. For me, and a lot of people, doing gigs is our primary nutrition.”

8-10 JULY

ELY FOLK FESTIVAL

song, then I think I’d be doing something wrong.” Their latest album – and perhaps best yet – deals with themes of illness, sadness and the human (and female) condition. “I had been thinking about human patterns, the stopping and starting of life and behaviour,” Kate says. She and her bandmates retreated to Wales to polish their arrangements for Off Off On before recording. “I’m a bit of a lone wolf. I like writing for me and can only do it properly on my own, so it’s important to balance

Morris dancing, real ale and roots music meet at this knees-up, with rising folk talent gracing the stage across three days. There will also be kids activities, ceilidhs and workshops for those wanting hands-on fun.

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK MAY 2022 29

PARTY SEASON

25-28 AUG

WE OUT HERE Taking place at the same site as Secret Garden Party in Abbots Ripton, We Out Here offers a genre-spanning, four-day celebration of jazz, soul, hip-hop, house, afro and electronica. Among this year’s acts is Emma-Jean Thackray – who has been lauded as one of the UK’s freshest jazz talents. Winner of multiple awards, a Mobo-nominee and hotly tipped by Jools Holland, her musical roots stretch far back. “Hearing my family singing along to stuff and seeing the joy that it brings people – that’s what captured my imagination,” she says. “My mum liked a lot of 80s soul, my dad is into pop-rock and my granddad is obsessed with Santana,” Emma-Jean continues. “He’s got 20 different Santana T-shirts that he wears every day.” Emma-Jean’s musical influences are multifarious. “Brass is such a ubiquitous sound in Yorkshire,” she explains. “The community feel that it brings has been something I’ve taken forward throughout my musical life.” Channelling John Coltrane and her Daoist beliefs, her music is spiritually slanted. “If you want to bring meaning to stuff that you’re doing, it has to be about something you believe in authentically. Tomorrow, I could make a techno record, the day after I could make free jazz. Both are just as much me.” The positivity of Daoism has seeped into her music. “I hope I can bring people along in a positive way. That would be the ideal world, if we were all aware of our universal oneness – but then again, on paper, I probably look like a bit of a hippie.” A multitalented performer, Emma-Jean leaps between playing instruments (among them cornet, trumpet and piano), producing and band-leading. “All these different hats are coming from the same place: I have an idea in my head of a song, the colours are there – I just need to make it happen,” she says. “If I ever have to do the same thing, my attention span starts to wane. “If you’re always waiting for a muse, that can be naive,” Emma-Jean adds. “You need to have the stuff in your toolkit to develop ideas. I can wake up in the night with a song in my head, like you see in films; sometimes it’s a lot of graft.” Looking forward to the full return of live performance, Emma-Jean has taken to the stage at all We Out Here festivals to date. “It’s got this intimate feeling. It’s very much about the music, which not a lot of festivals are.” Expect the unexpected: “Improvisation is where the jazz is: the language that you have, the way that you’re listening to each other, the way you’re responding – that’s jazz. It has to be in real time.”

10-12 JUNE

Cambridge Club Festival

For Corinne Bailey Rae, who performs at this year’s Cambridge Club, lockdown – returning home to Leeds after a spell touring the world – was strange to say the least. “Music is about being inspired in front of an audience, fed by the reaction of people. I’m not the sort of artist that will work on their own. I like to be around people and other musicians,” she says. Hopping across continents with her four- year-old daughter, she performed in Japan, South Africa, South America and the US. “It was weird to have a couple of years where that didn’t define me.” Taking a slice from psychedelia, she says: “As my career’s unfolded, I’ve felt more freedom to express the music that I love. I came from a background in indie guitars with the band Helen. Playing my first record, it was almost the opposite – I was used to shouting over guitars and it was amazing to play with a more conversational, gentle style.” On the comeback of 2000s music, the era when her single Put Your Records On became a smash hit, she says: “The vibe was emotional, all about deep feelings. Sometimes you go through phases where everything’s more cool, distant and even medicated. I can see why people want to go back to that era. I’m all about thinking about music in a non-linear way.” Performing at Cambridge Club Festival, she is expecting to be invigorated: “At a festival, you spin the wheel. I quite enjoy that energy, because I like to try and win people over.” She will be joined by iconic acts including Diana Ross, Nile Rodgers and Chic, The Jacksons and TLC, while other festival highlights are sure to include talks and stand-up in the Auditorium of Intrigue, as well as family fun ranging from den making to dodgeball! Both day tickets and weekend tickets are available for the event, which runs from 10 to 12 June at Childerley Orchard.

30 MAY 2022 CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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