Cambridge Education Guide Spring:Summer21 Web

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Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com SUB EDITOR Elisha Young elishayoung@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTOR Charlotte Phillips ADVERTISING GROUP AD MANAGER Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com SALES EXECUTIVE Lucy McNally 07377 653 430 lucymcnally@bright-publishing.com DESIGN & PRODUCTION DESIGNER Emily Lancaster emilylancaster@bright-publishing.com AD PRODUCTION Man-Wai Wong manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com

nything related to the pandemic can make for grim reading. Sifting for positives feels not just hopeless, but even trite. When it comes to education, however, the news – if not of the three-cheers, primary- colours variety – isn’t an unmitigated black, either. Yes, schools have been closed and face-to-face adult education largely shut down. But, despite this, the sense of community that’s sprung up to try and make lockdown learning as positive as it can possibly be has been extraordinary. The message for battle-weary parents, whether grappling with tearful toddlers or disenchanted teens (you can lead a child to textbooks, but you can’t make them think), has increasingly been one of reassurance, in our region and the country as a whole. It may not impact the day-to-day drudge, but when even a polymath like Professor A

Brian Cox is telling the nation that he, too, is struggling to home educate his children, parents can at least feel that they’re in good company, since even the exalted are experiencing their pain. Similarly, a widely shared head teacher’s email to parents, saying she’d had a desperate week with her own children, did wonders to boost the sense that we’re all in this together. There are so many big questions and very few answers. We just don’t know how much ground future generations will have lost after missing so much school, or whether there will be a lasting impact on mental health. It’s a safe assumption that official help will never be enough, but school communities have already shown an indomitable spirit when it comes to addressing and overcoming problems like getting to grips with the technology required to deliver online learning. It’s a given that the same determination will get us through the next phase.

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Contents

12 | CULFORD SCHOOL Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk IP28 6TX | 01284 385308 | culford.co.uk Set in 480 acres of beautiful parkland with an 18th-century mansion at its centre, Culford provides first-class boarding and day schooling for more than 670 children aged from 2¾ to 18. With a strong emphasis on sport, Culford believes in educating the whole person to deliver awell-rounded, fulfilled individual with excellent academic results.

18 | ST FAITH’S Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 8AG 01223 352073 | stfaiths.co.uk

St Faith’s School is an independent preparatory day school for boys and girls aged four to 13. The school prides itself on its dynamic community and warm, welcoming personality. It has a reputation for excellent standards, academically and across a huge breadth of subjects and activities. 20 | FELSTED SCHOOL Felsted, Essex CM6 3LL | 01371 822600 | felsted.org Only 45 minutes south of Cambridge, Felsted School offers families contemporary boarding options with a choice of three, five or seven nights a week. Pupils can access a wide academic curriculum, balanced with a rich programme of co-curricular activities to suit their talents and interests, all available on-site. 26 | GRESHAM’S Cromer Road, Holt, Norfolk NR25 6EA | 01263 714500 | greshams.com Set in 220 acres in beautiful north Norfolk, Gresham’s provides a high-quality, fully rounded, excellent education to boys and girls from the age of two to 18. 30 | ST JOHN’S COLLEGE SCHOOL 73 Grange Road, Cambridge CB3 9AB | 01223 353652 | sjcs.co.uk St John’s College School is an independent co-educational day and boarding school, which offers an exceptional educational experience to pupils aged four to 13. The college has won of the national Best Prep School and Best Prep School Head in the Tatler Schools Awards, and it also offers a Flexible Learning Programme.

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32 | KIMBOLTON SCHOOL Kimbolton, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 0EA 01480 860505 | kimbolton.cambs.sch.uk An independent co-educational day and boarding school, Kimbolton School offers a busy and stimulating environment for pupils between the ages of four and 18. 40 | KING’S ELY Old Palace, Palace Green, Ely CB7 4EW | 01353 660707 | kingsely.org A day and boarding school, King’s Ely offers an outstanding education for children and young people aged one to 18. The school provides a broad and balanced curriculum, with a focus on nurturing the abilities of each pupil. 44 | LANDMARK INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL The Old Rectory, 9 Church Lane, Fulbourn, Cambridge CB21 5EP 01223 755100 | landmarkinternationalschool.co.uk Landmark is a small, co-educational, non-selective, non-denominational school for children aged from six to 16 years, serving the educational needs of the south Cambridge area. 50 | MANDER PORTMAN WOODWARD 3-4 Brookside, Cambridge CB2 1JE | 01223 350158 | mpw.ac.uk MPW is a small, independent fifth and sixth form located in the heart of Cambridge, offering a range of courses. For children at other schools, it also offers popular Easter revision courses.

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52 | ST MARY' S SCHOOL Bateman St, Cambridge CB2 1LY | 01223 224167 | stmaryscambridge.co.uk An independent day and boarding school for girls aged four to 18, St Mary’s is located near the Cambridge Botanic Garden and offers GCSEs and A-levels.

58 | STOKE COLLEGE Stoke by Clare, Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 8JE 01787 278141 | stokecollege.co.uk

Stoke College is a day and boarding school for pupils from reception age to sixth form. With an average class size of ten, Stoke prides itself on its excellent pastoral care and strong academic success.

60 | THE LEYS The Leys, Cambridge CB2 7AD | 01223 508900 | theleys.net The Leys is a co-educational independent day and boarding school in Cambridge for 11 to 18 year olds. The school offers a close-knit, engaged and friendly community in which pastoral care is a top priority.

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Green shoots E D U C A T I O N I S A V I T A L P A R T O F E N S U R I N G E C O N OM I C G R OW T H A S W E E N T E R P A N D E M I C R E C O V E R Y – A N D C A M B R I D G E H A S A K E Y R O L E T O P L A Y

ecent research from The Centre for Cities, which releases regular reports measuring the economic temperature of cities around the country, including ours, makes no ensuring that underperforming areas start to grow and flourish as they should R bones about the importance of education in getting us back on our feet. Once we’re in recovery from the pandemic, boosting the economic health of the nation and

performed and the salaries they command. Perhaps unsurprisingly, our city offers more well-paid roles than many other areas. For this to remain the case, however, it means equipping the future workforce with the required skills to take up the opportunities on offer. The onus, as always, is on our education providers to make that happen. Nobody could deny the quality of teaching and learning on offer, from pre-school to post-grad, basic skills to Bachelor of Arts degrees (and way beyond).

needs to be a priority. As the springboard for growth, cities like ours have a key role to play. Ensuring that they continue to be successful requires a well-educated population, as well as the appropriate support for job creation. While there’s no cause for complacency, our area is one of those – again, according to the Centre for Cities – with a stronger local economy and a greater ability to weather the effects of Covid-19. A major aspect of the city’s success relies, in part, on the types of jobs

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However exceptional a lesson or tutorial is, though, its impact is inevitably diluted if there are barriers to learning, and pupils of any age are suffering the fallout from previously disrupted education in lockdown. Students may be anxious or grieving if, like so many, they’ve lost loved ones to Covid-19. Someone who’s sad, worried or lacking in confidence finds it far harder to learn effectively, so once they’re back in the classroom or lecture hall, students are going to need plenty of support and understanding. While investment in education is a hugely important topic, the issue for the future is deciding what the exact role of educators needs to be. Because of the emotional impact of the past 15 months, they may need to be counsellors and motivators, in addition to subject specialists. Their remit will be to help pupils emotionally, as well as intellectually, so learners of all ages can enter the right frame of mind to engage (and, in some cases, re-engage) with learning and education. The desire is certainly there. According to The Literacy Trust, children’s love of books and reading, which had reached a 15-year low, has increased during the periods of lockdown. Fortunately, planning for an uncertain future is something our area is notably good at doing. Schools, colleges and employers were thinking years into the future even before the pandemic struck. One local scheme, Cambridge LaunchPad, had been bringing pupils – aged eight to 18 – from local schools together with local firms that have harnessed science, technology, engineering and maths to become leaders in their areas. Children were given the chance to explore all these areas out of the classroom with hands-on activities, showing them how school studies have the potential to lead them into exciting and innovative careers. Specifically,

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the goal is to help develop the skilled workforce that our area needs – now more than ever. Assuming that becomes a reality, opportunities are sure to be out there for the upcoming generations. Optimism might feel in short supply, but it’s there if you look for it closely. While it may seem surprising to some, the number of start-up businesses in the UK has actually increased during the pandemic, as entrepreneurs spot new opportunities; many of these are closely linked to the surge in consumer demand for online goods and services. In our area, the figures were particularly encouraging. Despite the limitations of the pandemic, more businesses were registered in Cambridgeshire in 2020 than ever before, attesting to our area’s will to innovate. Even before Covid-19 struck, educators were reminding us that schools were having to prepare pupils for jobs that didn’t yet exist. The past year – with everyone having to get used to new ways of doing things and mass uncertainty around how much everything would change – has demonstrated the truth of that saying. But, in an area where innovation is almost baked into the community psyche, it’s easy to feel that if anywhere is able to adapt to new ways of thinking, working and being, it surely has to be here. “Children’s love of reading and books, which had reached a 15-year low, has increased during the periods of lockdown”

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Culford School B U R Y S T E D M U N D S

the pupils, who go on to excel in both their academic and sporting pursuits. Indeed, Culford School itself is just as unique as its staff and pupils. A blend of the historic and the modern, the school is set in 480 acres of beautiful Suffolk parkland, with an 18th-century mansion at its centre. It also boasts modern academic and sporting facilities that are the envy of schools and academies across the UK. No matter a pupil’s interest or passion, Culford School provides the foundation for them to flourish. Pupils have secured places at the most respected universities in the world, competed at national and international golf championships, and have been

here are few places quite like Culford. It is a school that places the individual at its heart, where teachers are committed to helping every child realise their potential and become the best they can be. You can see such dedication run throughout the school. Whether your child is one or 18 years old, Culford provides a high-quality education and the dynamic support needed to open up opportunities for every pupil. These combine into a highly personalised learning programme that helps each child achieve their aspirations. The Pre-Prep and Nursery, Prep and Senior Schools combine to offer a superb through-school experience for children. The school takes enormous pride in all

CULFORD SCHOOL, BURY ST EDMUNDS, SUFFOLK IP28 6TX

01284 385308

CULFORD.CO.UK

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“Pupils demonstrate excellent attitudes to learning as a result of a supportive and caring environment” Independent Schools Inspectorate

VIRTUAL OPEN MORNING available at culford.co.uk

KEY FACILITIES State-of-the-art library

ranked among the top ten junior tennis players in the UK. To that end, it is no coincidence Culford is currently ranked the top co-educational school for tennis in the UK by the Lawn Tennis Association. The school sees education as a transformational process that guides pupils toward academic success, gives them clear moral values and develops their leadership qualities in readiness for the adult world. SUPPORTING BUSY FAMILIES At Culford School, an Extended Day Programme is provided that has been designed to help busy working parents by giving them extra flexibility. The programme allows pupils to come into school as early

as 7.30am and leave as late as 6pm for Pre-Prep, 8pm for Prep pupils and 8.30pm for Senior pupils. Culford also offers full, part and flexible boarding options, which can be a great solution for busy families. CAMBRIDGE CONNECTION There is a shuttle service for pupils who live in and around Cambridge, leaving from Park & Ride stations and delivering pupils to school within 40 minutes. If you would like to learn more about the school or organise a personal visit, please visit the website or contact the admissions team on 01284 385308 or email admissions@culford.co.uk

Championship- standard indoor

tennis centre 25m heated swimming pool Football programme Indoor golf studio Drama theatres and music studio Dance programme

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Planning for a post-pandemic world W H E T H E R S C R A P P I N G G C S E S O R C R E A T I N G A N O P T I O N T O R E P E A T S C H O O L Y E A R S , T H E P O S T - C O V I D E D U C A T I O N L A N D S C A P E R E Q U I R E S R A D I C A L T H I N K I N G

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ith unimaginable events dominating life for us all during the past 15 months, we’re probably harder

to surprise than we used to be. Like the White Queen in Alice through the Looking- Glass , we’re becoming experts in believing six impossible things before breakfast. Chancellor Rishi Sunak teaching maths to primary school classes via video link? Why on earth not? Children regressing in lockdown – forgetting how to use a knife and fork or going back into nappies? In normal times, it would be a national scandal. Now, it’s just one more dismal example of how damaging these long months of isolation have proved. We will eventually emerge into a world where, if not vanquished, Covid-19 will become a chronic, but manageable problem. When we do, the ability to embrace the unusual or radical when it comes to education appears to be a must-have national core competency. School leaders, government and policy groups are coming up with ideas, some radical in approach. Some are new, others have been popping up on left-field agendas

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“Proposals that would previously have been dismissed out of hand are now getting serious consideration”

for eons. Currently, though, it feels as if the collective mindset has changed, with proposals that would previously have been dismissed out of hand, now getting serious consideration. It’s a sign of the times when keeping things the same (or close) is probably the most revolutionary thing you can do – like the decision by those in charge of the International Baccalaureate to continue offering final IB Diploma summer exams as usual in 2021 (though there is also an alternative model based on coursework and teacher-predicted grades where this isn’t possible). Thinking the unthinkable (and showing the workings behind their answers) are organisations like the Education Policy Institute (EPI). Its plan is that children who have experienced what it describes as ‘extreme learning loss’ should be able to repeat the school year. While not open to all pupils, it would help those who had fallen most behind during lockdown to

make up lost ground over the rest of their school career. This kind of flexibility has been something that many parents have dreamed of, particularly where their child is a summer-born baby who is very young for their chronological year. Though supported by the government (with further legislation planned), the final decision has always rested with schools and admissions authorities, and the complexities involved can put parents off. If this isn’t quite radical enough, how about scrapping one of the pillars of the current education system, the GCSE? There have been many critics of this venerable exam. It’s been renamed, diminished (because of grade inflation), changed from one-off exams to a modular structure, then largely back to once-and- for-all exams again. But, the fundamental notion that we need to test pupils at 16, and then again at 18, has remained largely unquestioned.

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Critics of the current system come from state and independent schools, with a good smattering of politicians, such as former education secretary Lord Baker, among their number. Now that the pandemic has compelled educators to find different ways of measuring children’s progress, achievements and readiness for the next stage of their education, it’s argued that it’s time to dispense with GCSEs for good. According to critics, these exams generate pressure and overt competition. Once a way of sending children out into the world with tangible proof of their achievements when the leaving age was 16, they serve little purpose now that children must stay in education or training until they reach 18. Other organisations want a fundamental reimagining – not just of how we measure children’s engagement with education, but its purpose, goals and structure. Unesco, stressing the need for nations to work together, has produced nine ideas on planning for post-pandemic education. The organisation stresses that, while online learning has taken off during the pandemic, physical schools still have a unique role to play. It wants teachers and students to be able to access free and open-source technology, so they’re not dependent on limited or paid-for resources developed by others. It also reiterates the vital need to rethink the curriculum, so that scientific literacy becomes a priority – vital, it says, at a time when there is so much misinformation and denial of science out in the world. Schools in our area are already hard at work planning for the best possible outcomes for current and future pupils. We can’t expect anyone to have the answers yet. But it’s fair to assume that – given the quality of many school leaders – they will begin by asking the right questions, however difficult and disruptive, as the starting point in planning the best way forward for our school-age population.

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St Faith’s C A M B R I D G E

here are many reasons why the Times Education Supplement named St Faith’s Pre-Prep/Prep School of the Year in 2019. Not least, according to the judges, because of the school’s innovation, commitment to sustainability and narrative of excellence in a number of key areas of school life, but also because: Ƚ Ƚ Opportunities to learn, explore, create and think abound in every classroom, from English to engineering, science to sport and classics to computing. Ƚ Ƚ Children at St Faith’s are developed, nurtured and taught to equip themselves well for life. Ƚ Ƚ World-class teachers tailor their styles to meet each child’s individual needs, making lessons accessible, engaging and challenging for every pupil.

Ƚ Ƚ The school’s academic curriculum (including computing and engineering) is groundbreaking in its innovative content, resulting in an average of 28 senior scholarships awarded annually. Ƚ Ƚ Future-facing academic subjects are interspersed with numerous sporting endeavours, musical experiences, artistic creations and dramatic performances. Ƚ Ƚ Children have the space and time to express themselves away from the classroom, thanks to a spacious site, carefully planned timetables and holistic pastoral care structure. Ƚ Ƚ The school follows an accelerated curriculum across all subjects, thanks to small class sizes, talented teachers and pupils’ above-average abilities.

VIRTUAL TOURS:

Tour the school online with the headmaster: stfaiths.co.uk/ admissions

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In 2018, the Times Educational Supplement awarded St Faith’s the Strategic Education Initiative for the introduction of engineering. The Good Schools Guide said: “Overall, a very impressive school. Plenty of space, an excellent innovative education but, most importantly, a joyous place to be.” The Week Independent Schools Guide 2019 selected St Faith’s as the Best for Innovation, referencing the STEM facilities. Finally, Tatler commented: “The school’s strong academic ethos is driven by an innovative future-focused curriculum and an emphasis on engineering, which gives pupils invaluable problem-solving skills and a confidence that’s evident across the board.” But don’t just believe what you read – see for yourself on a virtual tour with the headmaster. Drop in on lessons, observe children engaged in their learning and feel what it’s like to be part of this award-winning school. Please contact the registrar, Anna Cornell, on 01223 229421 if you would like to speak to a member of the admissions team over video call.

Ƚ Ƚ Every classroom is equipped with the latest teaching technologies, while screen-free days ensure teaching is not digitally reliant. Ƚ Ƚ The library boasts over 12,000 volumes relevant to all readers, from the youngest to the most advanced. Ƚ Ƚ Plentiful sporting opportunities – not just a focus on glory and trophy collection. Sport empowers mental as well as physical fitness, resilience and team spirit, and is an emotive demonstration of getting out of life what you put in. Ƚ Ƚ The engineering and computing facilities are equipped beyond many inventors’ wildest dreams, complete with virtual reality studios and an astronomy suite. Ƚ Ƚ A state-of-the-art STEM Hub provides expansive indoor space for large-scale interdisciplinary projects, including wave machines and suspension bridges. Ƚ Ƚ St Faith’s performing and creative arts develop self-belief and confidence and give children a lifelong appreciation of the arts.

TRUMPINGTON ROAD CAMBRIDGE CB2 8AG

01223 352073

INFO@ STFAITHS.CO.UK

STFAITHS.CO.UK

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Felsted School N O R T H E S S E X

ore and more children are reaping the benefits of going to school outside Cambridge, where they can take advantage of wide open spaces, countryside air, academic excellence, superb on-site extracurricular activities and modern boarding facilities. Situated only 40 minutes south of Cambridge in the picturesque north Essex countryside, Felsted offers families a variety of flexible boarding options to suit modern family life. With a school bus leaving Trumpington on a Sunday evening for weekly boarders, such a flexible approach has encouraged many families to choose Felsted as the right option for their child. M

A SUPERB ALL-ROUND EDUCATION Every child is exposed to a wealth of opportunities and developed on their intellectual, emotional, social, physical, artistic, creative and spiritual potentials. Small class sizes taught by highly qualified and dedicated teachers ensure talents are nourished and every child’s personal growth is encouraged. With pupil wellbeing at the heart of Felsted, pupils flourish in an atmosphere of diversity and excellence, intellectual curiosity and challenge. A broad curriculum in balance with a rich programme of co-curricular activities is on offer to suit individual talents and interests, all available on-site. Felsted focuses on building each child’s character to become happy,

FELSTED SCHOOL, FELSTED, ESSEX CM6 3LL (40 minutes south of Cambridge)

01371 822605

FELSTED.ORG

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well-rounded and confident young adults and to empower them to believe that they can really make a difference in the world, whatever path they choose. ACADEMIC CHOICE Felsted offers sixth-formers a choice of A-levels or the International Baccalaureate Diploma to suit their individual strengths and interests. Alongside a superior work education programme and a robust parent/former pupil network offering top work experience opportunities, most pupils gain access to their first choice university or on an increasingly popular degree apprenticeship programme. TOP RESULTS Felsted offers a holistic education to children of all abilities, priding itself on providing exceptional added value through outstanding pastoral care. Felsted is proud to have pupils go on to attend top universities around the world, including those in Canada, USA, the Netherlands and in the UK, including Cambridge, Oxford, Durham, St Andrews and Exeter, among others. NATIONAL SPORTING REPUTATION Shortlisted for Sports School of the Year 2019 by Tes , Felsted has an enviable reputation both locally and nationally for the high quality of its sporting teams and the dedication and expertise of its coaching staff. All abilities are catered for and every pupil is encouraged to enjoy a recreational interest in individual or team games, while developing a healthy attitude to fitness and exercise. Close professional links with clubs such as Essex Cricket, Saracens and Northampton Rugby, London Pulse Netball, and Old Loughtonians and Cambridgeshire Hockey ensure a pathway of excellence is in place for those excelling in their field. JUNIOR GUILDHALL PARTNERSHIP In addition to a fantastic music school with numerous opportunities to perform, those showing outstanding talent may study at the Junior Guildhall in London in partnership with Felsted. This combination of top-level tuition in music and academics offers an exceptional educational package for top young musicians. “A school that brings out the best in everyone” The Good Schools Guide

SHORTLISTED FOR THREE AWARDS

@FELSTEDSCHOOL

@FELSTED_SCHOOL

Prep School of the Year

Boarding School of the Year

INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Central to the international ethos that permeates all areas of Felsted life, an active Model United Nations programme ensures students leave school as informed global citizens. As a global member of the Round Square Organisation, students have the additional opportunity to exchange with partner schools around the world. SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES Felsted offers a number of scholarships and awards in academia, sport, music, drama, art and design technology from the age of 11, with the opportunity to access a top-up bursary on a means-tested basis. Several 100% means-tested bursaries may also be offered each year. Felsted hosts a number of open mornings and taster days each year, but also welcomes families on an individual basis. Further details can be found on the website felsted.org or by contacting the admissions office on 01371 822605.

Sports School of the Year

A-LEVELS & IB DIPLOMA

AGES FOUR TO 18

CO-EDUCATIONAL

DAY & BOARDING

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Bridging the inequality gap

W I T H A W I D E N I N G C H A S M B E T W E E N C H I L D R E N O F D I F F E R I N G B A C K G R O U N D S , I N I T I A T I V E S A R E H E L P I N G D I S A D V A N T A G E D P U P I L S R E A L I S E T H E I R P O T E N T I A L

hile many statistics related to the pandemic are startling, those around children’s education and wellbeing are more jaw-dropping than most. With the education of 10 million school-age pupils disrupted by the pandemic, there is a growing need to identify what the effects are, who’s been worst affected, as well as the consequences for these children and, ultimately, the economy as a whole. One way of working out how people progress in later life is to add up the time they spent in school. Statistically, the shorter the time in education, the lower their earnings. According to one study, children who have missed half a year of school during the pandemic are set to earn £40,000 less throughout their lives than if they had stayed in school. Inevitably, the impact is greatest on children who were already disadvantaged. Teachers worry that, as a result of lockdown, the gap in educational achievement between these children W

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“While there’s a belief that it’s just the elderly left behind by the online revolution, inequality is also having a devastating effect on young children in poorer families”

and others from more affluent backgrounds could widen further over time. One of the biggest issues relates to technology. There’s a deep-seated digital inequality in this country that predates the pandemic. With children relying on technology to learn from home, this disparity has become even more apparent. While there’s a common belief that it’s just the elderly who have been left behind by the online revolution, this isn’t the case, say researchers from Cambridge University. Digital inequality is also having a devastating effect on young children in poorer families. Brutally, the more you earn, the better your internet access. While almost every high-earning family has a good level of access, that drops to just half for low-earning families. Cost, unsurprisingly, is the problem: for some families, going online can mean going hungry – a choice between Wi-Fi or feeding the family. It’s no wonder that, according to social mobility group The Sutton Trust, just 5% of teachers were confident that all their pupils would be able to access online learning. What’s also become abundantly clear is that when it comes to meeting children’s basic needs, some are suffering far more than others. Trussell Trust, which operates food banks across the nation, states that 1.9 million people used a food bank in 2019/2020 – 300,000 more than the previous period. That increase also applies to our area, where 80,000 of the 200,000 visits to local food banks involved children. Closing the gap between the haves and have-nots may be a long-term ambition, but plenty of organisational and individual initiatives are making a difference now. When the first lockdown began, some schools and colleges struggled with the move to online teaching. This time, they should be cheered to the rafters for everything they’ve done to support children who required most help. With each successive lockdown, online learning has happened faster and more smoothly. Staff in our area have pulled out all the

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numeracy in schools. The government has also looked at sending in a small army of private tutors to help. School leaders are broadly supportive – as long as this is the start of a long-term programme, and not a flash in the pan that ends when the immediate crisis is over and society looks as if it’s back to normal. Though inequalities in our society are nothing new, the pandemic has served to bring them to our attention once more. If the will, resources and funding are brought together, perhaps this represents a defining moment in the way we confront inequality in society.

mental-health programmes, allowing local children from disadvantaged backgrounds to catch up and realise their full potential. There’s much more to come. As schools reopen, large-scale operations offering catch-up tuition are planned, aimed specifically at disadvantaged pupils. It’s likely to take the form of one-to-one or small-group tuition, something that’s already being trialled with encouraging results, suggesting that pupils are capable of making huge progress in a short time. Another not-for-profit scheme trains students and recent graduates so they can offer individual tuition in literacy and

stops – with lessons learned throughout the past year, many now have a slick operation in place, making life for home-educating parents that bit easier. They’ve reached out to families quickly, providing the lowdown on lockdown learning. Most importantly, they’ve explained how lessons will work effectively. Some schools have handed out devices to children from struggling families, including iPads and Chromebooks, ensuring they can still access their virtual classrooms. Other groups in our area have also stepped in to help. New local charities have raised money to fund wellbeing and

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Gresham’s H O L T , N O R T H N O R F O L K

Image: Wilkinson Eyre Architects

resham’s is a historic and vibrant co-educational school, founded in 1555, providing a fully rounded education to children aged two to 18. The school has

at the school, is enabling the innovative new centre for science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) education. The building of a dedicated centre for STEAM subjects disrupts the established narrative that young people must choose between science and the arts at an early stage of their life. By teaching the subjects side by side, pupils can begin to see how the knowledge gained from one discipline can be used in a creative way in another. Creativity and original thinking have always been the cornerstones of a Gresham’s education, and the Dyson Building will establish state-of-the-art facilities to see this continue into the mid-21st century.

AGES 2 TO 18

excellent facilities spanning 200 acres, set in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty just four miles from the north Norfolk coast. Gresham’s holds an ‘excellent’ rating across all nine categories from the Independent Schools Inspectorate, which is testament to the high-quality teaching and outstanding pastoral care. THE DYSON BUILDING The Dyson Building will open at Gresham’s in September 2021. Sir James Dyson, a former pupil

CO-EDUCATIONAL

DAY & BOARDING

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ADVERT I SEMENT FEATURE

“Hard to think who would not thrive in this happy,

well-run school” The Good Schools Guide

Spaces will be equipped with the latest technology, with art hubs, IT points and open-stair seating areas, turning the spine of the building into an area for collaborative studies. The provision of these spaces recognises that learning does not stop outside of the classroom, nor should it be confined to examined curriculum, and the aim is to create a hub where pupils can come together to share and exchange ideas in social learning spaces. Pupils will also have the time and space to engage in creative projects and, in the process, take different approaches to problem-solving; learn to work collaboratively with others; start to understand how to turn an idea into reality; and develop their decision-making skills. There is no doubt these skills will be very important throughout their lives and future careers. REMARKABLE ALUMNI Gresham’s provides a broad and enriching education, enabling pupils to discover their own talents and

develop into confident, well-rounded individuals. The school has a tradition of producing outstanding achievers in all walks of life, including architects, diplomats, engineers, musicians, sportsmen and sportswomen, plus many more. Old Greshamians have been inspiring others for generations, from composer Sir Benjamin Britten to poet W H Auden. More recently, Old Greshamians making their mark include international rugby players Tom and Ben Youngs and Academy Award-winning actor Olivia Colman. A PERFECT LOCATION North Norfolk is a beautiful place to live and learn. A weekly bus operates to and from Cambridge, leaving school at 4.45pm on Saturdays and dropping at Trumpington Park and Ride at 6.45pm. Pick-up is from Trumpington Park and Ride at 6.45pm on Sunday, arriving back at school for 8.45pm. Academic, art, music, drama and sport scholarships, and bursaries, are available.

GRESHAM’S, CROMER RD, HOLT, NORFOLK NR25 6EA

01263 714614

ADMISSIONS@ GRESHAMS.COM

GRESHAMS.COM

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EDUCAT ION T IMEL INE

THE EDUCATI O N

AGE 4½–7 Talk to your child’s current school about their progress and ask for advice on future schools. Visit prep schools (usually from year 2) and note registration deadlines (normally the autumn term of the preceding academic year). Check details and dates of assessments.

AGE 7–11 If your child attends a fee-paying school, use teachers as a sounding board for possible senior schools. Attend any meetings covering future schools (normally from year 4). Visit senior school open days (from year 4 or earlier). Check deadlines for 11+ registration (normally the November or December prior to entry). If you wish to apply for a scholarship, note any separate deadlines for this, together with 11+ entrance exam dates (normally held in January of year 6). Liaise with the school about preparation for these and flag any concerns. Children sitting the 11+ Common Entrance exam in year 6 will also need to be registered (in October or December for examination in November or January, respectively).

BIRTH TO PRE SCHOOL (RISING FOUR) Visit local nurseries and childcare providers. Register your child as soon as possible, particularly if you require full-time nursery provision at an early age. Visit local pre-preps. Check deadlines for registration, but plan ahead – popular schools may have an official deadline but, if oversubscribed, will offer places based on the date of registration.

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EDUCAT ION T IMEL INE 29 TIMELINE T H E K E Y D E C I S I ON S T O B E MA D E A T D I F F E R E N T S T AG E S O F YOU R C H I L D ’ S E D U C A T I ON A L J OU R N E Y

AGE 11–16 Register your child for 13+ Common Entrance/scholarship exams, sat in year 8 for year 9 entry. In year 9, pupils will be asked to choose their GCSE options, taken in the summer of year 11 – subjects such as languages, art, drama and humanities (this will be in addition to core subjects such as English language and literature, maths and sciences). In year 10 and year 11, visit open events at sixth form schools and colleges to discuss possible courses, including apprenticeships (from age 16). Register for places. The deadline for registration and assessments/interviews is normally the autumn term of year 11.

AGE 16–18 Start planning for life after school. Attend careers talks, visit universities, research UCAS requirements and deadlines: October of the preceding academic year for Oxbridge, medicine, dentistry and veterinary science; mid-January for most other degree courses. Accept or defer a university place once A-level results are in (August) or apply for a place through clearing. If workplace-based training and qualifications are the goal, start considering which industry or occupation best matches interests and career ambitions, and research schemes and employers.

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St John’s College School C A M B R I D G E

t John’s is the only school to have been awarded national Best Prep School and national Best Head of a Prep School in the Tatler Schools Awards. It is also the only prep school to have its teaching rated ‘inspirational’ by the Independent Schools Inspectorate, and the first of very few to have achieved the coveted ‘exceptional’ grade for children’s attainment. It is described by The Good Schools Guide as “a joyous place that’s buzzing”. At St John’s, staff believe in a childhood filled with affection, in which children know that they are known and valued, in which they learn to trust themselves and each other, in which they find and express their voices, discover the differences they can make for themselves and others, learn to think for themselves, to question, to collaborate, to be independent, and to own and take charge of their learning and their lives. The education at St John’s is about the whole child. Pupils become independent learners and creative thinkers who are prepared to question, with their curiosity very much alive. They get the best from themselves and achieve very highly within, and beyond, the classroom. The aim is for the children to develop a real generosity of spirit, to know and care about how to get the best from others, to do well while at the school and long after they have left for pastures new. FLEXIBLE LEARNING The youngest children are full of questions, rich with curiosity, and staff work to preserve and strengthen their questioning and thinking skills. From the earliest age, pupils are given essential tools, knowledge and understanding, with the aim to also give them more. St John’s College School has a flexible learning programme of development, incorporating child-led, independent learning, creative and critical thinking,

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ADVERT I SEMENT FEATURE

OPEN DAYS To find out more about the next virtual open days, please contact the registrar (01223 353652) or admissions@ sjcs.co.uk

percentile on national tests or ability before they leave. Exam results are outstanding and, on average, the 56 leavers gain around 26 scholarships to the strongest schools. The children continue to be exceptional learners: up to one third of past pupils gain Oxbridge places each year in due course, more than in the most academically selective of schools. KNOWING AND CARING FOR YOUR CHILD Education at its best is a profound act of care. If we care, then we will notice. If we notice, then we will act on a child’s behalf. If we act for each child, then each child will achieve their best and become their best selves. To be known, to be noticed, to be valued, to be cared for – fundamental things for all of us, these are the essentials of a good childhood, and they are at the heart of the St John’s way. FIND OUT MORE You can get to know more about the ethos of St John’s College School by signing up for one of the virtual open days or by arranging a personal tour to look around St John’s and to ask any questions. Please contact the registrar ( 01223 353652) or admissions@sjcs.co.uk

digitally enhanced learning, philosophy, emotions for learning, compassion and loving kindness, as well as outdoor learning, which benefits from access to a landscaped forest garden. An enrichment programme has been implemented for nine to 13 year olds to explore the development of sustainability projects, as well as enjoy cross- curricular work in computing, the arts, design technology, maths and science, and to give space to My Mind (incorporating mindfulness, study skills, tai chi, PSHEE and philosophy, as a foundation for the skills necessary for critical thinking, self-management of learning and management of self). The aim is to foster children’s ability to possess their own learning, engage their innate curiosity and creativity, and encourage them to connect with their feelings about themselves and the world. ATTAINMENT A curriculum that puts belief in children at its core draws from them the highest levels of attainment, and pupil’s achievement is described by inspectors as ‘exceptional’. Though the school is not selective at kindergarten, the children are on average in the 85th

73 GRANGE ROAD, CAMBRIDGE CB3 9AB

01223 353652

SJCS.CO.UK

ADMISSIONS@ SJCS.CO.UK

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Kimbolton C A M B R I D G E S H I R E

K

imbolton is a really special place, where students aren’t just a number or a great set of grades. Individual talent is nurtured from reception to sixth form, and boys and

girls aged four to 18 thrive in the school’s happy, safe environment. Pupils develop into grounded, confident and capable individuals, interested in the world around them and able to express their ideas and personalities. INSPIRING INDEPENDENT THINKERS The school enjoys an historic setting, but with a modern outlook and facilities for the digital age, including a new Science and Maths Centre. The use of iPads by every pupil in the senior school has given teachers a powerful creative tool with which to enthuse children to effectively organise, communicate, learn and study. Kimbolton’s teachers utilise this technology alongside traditional methods, giving children a strong advantage in future learning and employment. Almost all pupils gain places at their chosen universities, with many heading to Oxbridge colleges and Russell Group universities. The school has a strong track record of students receiving offers for the most competitive courses, including medicine, dentistry and veterinary sciences. CREATING REAL CONNECTIONS While academic excellence is at the heart of everything the school does, the Kimbolton experience offers much more. Renowned for its caring, family ethos, visitors frequently comment on the kindness, consideration and respect that underpins the 1000-strong community. Small class sizes and an established house system mean that every pupil has a strong sense of belonging. Children forge a broad range of friendships across all ages and are keen to welcome newcomers and help them to settle in quickly.

KIMBOLTON, HUNTINGDON PE28 0EA

01480 860505

KIMBOLTON. CAMBS.SCH.UK

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“Not flashy, but classy. Those parents in the know appreciate that a Kimbolton education is money well spent” The Good Schools Guide

AGES FOUR TO 18

CO-EDUCATIONAL

FROM CODING TO CANOEING More than 120 clubs and societies f lourish at Kimbolton, playing a key part in pupils’ development into interesting adults and offering them a remarkable range of opportunities beyond the classroom. From coding in Robotics Club to competing in the 125-mile Devizes to Westminster International Canoe Race, opportunities abound in sport, drama, art, music and outdoor pursuits. The school also has a thriving Combined Cadet Force, a Community Service Unit and an extensive programme of trips and visits. Such a wide variety of extracurricular experiences helps to build children’s social skills and self-esteem – the bedrock for a happy and fulfilled life.

SUPPORTING BUSY FAMILIES Out-of-hours options provide high-quality support to working parents. A before- and after-school club for the younger pupils, plus activities and homework sessions extend the school day. Many of Kimbolton’s children use the dedicated bus service, while others choose from a range of f lexible, cost-effective boarding options (rated ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted). Kimbolton is about half an hour from Cambridge and 40 minutes by train from London. Scholarships and bursaries are available. To arrange a visit, please call the registrar on 01480 862209 or visit kimbolton.cambs.sch.uk/visit

DAY & BOARDING

OPEN DAYS Prep School (ages 4-11) on Friday 7 May and Friday 8 October ; Senior School (ages 11-16) and Sixth Form (ages 16-18) on Saturday 2 October

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Schools Directory

BASSINGBOURN VILLAGE COLLEGE 11-16 years A small, supportive academy placing great importance on the individual. Excellent educational opportunities and a wide range of extracurricular activities. South End, Bassingbourn, Hertfordshire SG8 5NJ 01763 242344 bassingbournvc.net

CAMBRIDGE ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP 4-18 years

CAMBRIDGE ACADEMY FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 13-19 years

CAMBRIDGE STEINER SCHOOL 2-14 years A small, non-selective, co-educational school, offering dynamic and progressive education. Hinton Road, Fulbourn, Cambridge CB21 5DZ 01223 882 727 cambridge-steiner-school. co.uk

Includes The Galfrid School, Parkside, Coleridge and Trumpington Community Colleges, CAST as well as Parkside Sixth. Various Cambridge locations Various cap.education

An inspiring, specialist academy, offering a unique opportunity to work with nearby organisations. Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0SZ 01223 724300 cast.education

BISHOP ’ S STORTFORD COLLEGE  4-18 years

 A co-educational day and boarding school, with the aim of developing well-rounded, skilful, happy young people.  10 Maze Green Road, Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 2PJ 01279 838575 bishopsstortfordcollege.org BOTTISHAM VILLAGE COLLEGE  11-16 years  A comprehensive independent academy with outstanding results in a number of fields.  Lode Road, Bottisham CB25 9DL 01223 811250 bottishamvc.org

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SCHOOL S D I RECTORY

CAMBOURNE VILLAGE COLLEGE  11-16 years  One of the area’s newest secondaries offers modern facilities and an environment that encourages and inspires.  Sheepfold Lane, Cambourne CB23 6FR 01954 284000 cambournevc.org

CASTLE SCHOOL  2-19 years  A school for pupils with

CHESTERTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE  11-16 years

COLERIDGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 11-16 years

special educational needs, aiming to make learning fun and to develop pupils in a safe and caring environment.  Courtney Way, Cambridge CB4 2EE 01223 442400 castleschool.info

 A multicultural community college aiming to instil a love of learning in every pupil.  Gilbert Road, Cambridge CB4 3NY 01223 712150

A school with excellent facilities and staff who help students achieve their potential. Radegund Road, Cambridge CB1 3RJ 01223 712300 coleridge.education

ccc.cambridgeshire educationaltrust.org

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