Cambridge Edition April 2020 - WEB

YOU R MON T H L Y F I X OF LOCA L L I F E

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WITH OUR CITY IN LOCKDOWN, WE LOOK AT HOW LOCAL BUSINESSES ARE EVOLVING, PLUS OFFER IDEAS & INSPIRATION FOR FOOD, FAMILY FUN & SUPPORTING YOUR COMMUNITY

EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Editorial assistant Frances McNaughton 01223 499469 francesmcnaughton@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editors Elisha Young & Felicity Evans ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Ad sales manager Ed Grundy 01223 499463 edgrundy@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Lucy McNally 01223 492248 lucymcnally@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Sue Bailey, Daisy Dickinson, Chelsea Fearnley, Siobhan Godwood, Charlotte Griffiths, Alex Rushmer, Anna Taylor, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Rob Kerrison and Victoria Davies DESIGN & PRODUCTION Designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong

could never have imagined the grim reality which would be facing us when I sat down to write this month’s welcome. Our daily concerns have gone from trivial thoughts and minor annoyances to desperate worry over our loved ones and our livelihoods. Many sectors face an existential threat as the crisis deepens – notably hospitality, but very much including local publishing. As with so many small, independent businesses, our mantra has become a simple one: diversify or die. So that’s exactly what we intend to do. Creating a

what’s on magazine when there’s nothing… on ... just won’t work, so we’re switching things up. This issue, and for as long as we’re in this, we’re going to be exploring different kinds of content in Cambridge Edition. Usually you can’t stop us from banging on about events, new openings, pop-ups and festivals, but since most of us are now staying in for the foreseeable, we’re going to be bringing you ideas for how to stave off boredom in lockdown, from recipes to craft projects to book recommendations. We’re also going to be delivering a big helping of positivity and community spirit by sharing stories of local heroes, volunteer groups and charitable initiatives. If the coronavirus crisis has shown us anything so far, it’s how willing the Cambridge community is to come together and support one another. And we think that deserves celebrating. We’ve also come to the conclusion that our usual print and digital channels are not enough, so we’ve launched something new: a daily digital newsletter which will feature news, ideas and inspiration as we, as a community, fight back against coronavirus. Cambridge is a place filled with ideas, stupendous helpings of brains, creativity and ingenuity, and we will get through this. Together. We would love to hear your stories and ideas, whether you’re evolving your business, diversifying your offering or you

manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

FIND US @CAMBSEDITION

CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

want to tell us about a community hero whose story deserves telling. We have a platform and we’re here to help. Stay strong, look after each other, enjoy the issue and see you next month. Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Laura Bryant , senior designer at Bright Publishing

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11 ● ARTS & CULTURE All the goings-on in the Cambridge arts scene right now 15 ● BOOK CLUB Gytha Lodge’s Watching From the Dark is a page-turner not to be missed 18 ● COMMUNITY SPECIAL Find out how you can support your community during coronavirus 22 ● SELF-ISOLATION SAVIOURS Local businesses are here to help you through social distancing 24 ● QUARANTINE FUN WITH KIDS We’ve got plenty of ideas for indoor activities to keep kids occupied 28 ● CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer considers how his sector might fight back in this crisis 30 ● CAMBRIDGE TAKEAWAY BIBLE Our list of the city’s top takeaways to enjoy while we’re on lockdown 37 ● LIFE ON THE VEG This month, Chelsea talks us through her top picks for vegan cakes

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39 ● RECIPES Dinner and dessert ideas from Amélie restaurant’s chefs Regis and Alex 44 ● HOTEL REVIEW We checked out Bury St Edmunds’ Ravenwood Hall hotel

50 ● BEAUTY BIBLE High-fashion hues, showstopping eyes and bold lips are on the cards this month 55 ● GARDENS Anna Taylor shares what’s going on in the garden this month 57 ● INTERIORS From tiles to tubs, this month we’re tackling bathroom design 64 ● WILLIAMS ANTIQUES Forget fast furniture; we’re looking to the past for home inspiration

46 ● INDIE OF THE MONTH We talk opportunities and organic veg with social enterprise Prospects Trust 49 ● EDUCATION Tutor Doctor’s top five tips for helping children through the revision period

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ONL INE ART • V I RTUAL GARDENS • NEW DATES FOR LOCAL F EST I VALS

IMAGES Don’t despair: this year’s Wild Wood Disco has been rescheduled for 12 September 2020!

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BOTANIC GARDEN VIRTUAL TOURS Cambridge University’s Botanic Garden has come up with an innovative idea to get you through this challenging time of self-isolation and social distancing. As we are all stuck at home at the moment, finding ways to get our nature fix is becoming increasingly difficult or, in some cases, impossible. It can feel like a struggle to go long periods of time without getting out and about in the fresh air, particularly at such a beautiful time of year, but from now on, the Botanic Garden will be coming to the rescue, posting a weekly ‘Wellness Wander’ on its website – a virtual short walkabout video around areas of the garden. Each video is ten to 15 minutes long, and while the garden itself is closed during lockdown, fans will be able to enjoy spring virtually, watching the season unfold week by week. Head over to the website for more details, and you can also find all the videos on YouTube as the weeks go by. botanic.cam.ac.uk

NEW DATES FOR FESTIVALS When it comes to local festivals, they don’t get much better than Wild Wood Disco. The highly anticipated event was set to take place in June, but has now been pushed back three months to 12 September. My Little Festival, the organisers behind the event, said in a statement: “Our wish is for our wonderful party in the woods to continue for many years to come, which is why we have to reschedule to secure its future. We have had

September remains intact, so we can offer the same incredible family day out. We thank you for all your continued support and look forward to seeing you all in September. Stay safe!” For those who purchased a ticket for the events, tickets will be automatically transferred to the new date. You will receive an email from the ticket seller to confirm your availability to attend, but if not, you can always roll over your ticket to next year. Refunds can also be provided, if needed. Keep an eye on the event websites for any updates and more information. Sunday Papers Live, another of My Little Festival’s events, also has a new date and will now offer its usual irreverent take on the broadsheets (with tasty food and bloody marys!) at Cambridge Union on 25 October. thewildwooddisco.com thewildwoodrumpus.com

a wonderful response from artists changing schedules so they can still be involved with our small, but special event.” Similarly, sister festival Wild Wood Rumpus – a one-day family-friendly gathering – was originally scheduled for June, but has now also been moved, to Saturday 19 September. The event will feature the original line-up in its entirety. In an announcement on the website, the team said: “We are pleased to announce our line-up for

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The Trove Cambridge THIS INNOVATIVE ONLINE HUB IS SHOWCASING THE WORK OF CREATIVES ACROSS CAMBRIDGESHIRE

t a time when small independent businesses need as much support as they can get, The Trove Cambridge is

a project that’s bound to be appreciated. Founded by Cambridge local Stephanie Stott, The Trove connects creatives from across the county with their wider community, showcasing their work and services to support and promote small businesses and artists. Since its inception in 2014, The Trove has progressed from being a personal blog, slowly but surely becoming a platform for promoting local artists across Cambridgeshire. “It’s developed over the past six years,” says Stephanie, “but it was about two years ago when I realised that I could really offer something to local

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The project has been so popular, in fact, that Stephanie now plans on launching a magazine to run alongside the project. “The vision we’ve got at the moment is of an A5 magazine,” says Stephanie. “It will hopefully be something we can put out in local coffee shops and community centres and have available at events as well. Mostly it will be featured profiles on our members specifically, so that we can incorporate them as much as possible – and a directory in the back with a list of all the members.” #CambsCreativeScene magazine will be a collaborative effort with local illustrator, graphic designer and printmaker Dario Fisher, who Stephanie has been brainstorming ideas with ever since the idea came about. “Dario got in touch last year and said he had an idea to put together a magazine featuring creatives to help promote their work in Cambridge. So when I decided to launch The Trove as a business, I got back in touch with him and we started coming up with ideas,” Stephanie explains. “We’re looking at having articles that aren’t necessarily time sensitive. We’re thinking of approaching local creative groups; Urban Sketchers Cambridge, Cambridge Open Studio, and – because I’m covering Cambridgeshire as a whole rather than just Cambridge – organisations out in Peterborough, St Ives, Ely and other areas of the county as well to get articles on what they’re doing. The idea being that the content in the magazine can hold up for more than a couple of months at a time, so that it’s something that people can keep referring to. And depending on how the first issue goes, I’m hoping that it’ll be something we can do more of over the next year!” Right now, Stephanie is working on facilitating an online/virtual exhibition and marketplace to support indie artists, makers and small businesses who have been affected by coronavirus and the cancellation of local events. Anyone who might be interested in taking part can get in touch by emailing hello@ thetrovecambridge.co.uk. Head to The Trove’s website for more information on how you can help support local artists, and to hear more about upcoming creative projects you can get involved with. thetrovecambridge.co.uk

creatives.” She set up a trial membership scheme, and had 70 members sign up in that trial period. “It was encouraging; there was obviously scope for me to do what I could through the website, blog and social media to support local artists and makers.” Many creatives that sign up stay for the long run: “a good proportion of members have been a part of The Trove for about five years,” Stephanie says. “When I was first setting it up, I would attend events and tell people what I was doing – so I formed relationships that have continued over those years.” The Trove offers continual support for creatives and creative organisations in the area, and is always looking to spark curiosity and encourage people to explore Cambridge’s creative scene. “There is a stream of people finding out about what I’m doing and discovering the website,” Stephanie adds. “They might find out about it from a leaflet they’ve picked up at an open studio, through a friend or online. I get lots of feedback saying this is a great thing I’m doing.” The Trove is now well established on social media, boasting a sizeable following and its very own hashtag. “I started to use the hashtag #CambsCreativeTreasures on Instagram on posts where I’d discovered local artwork, or to share something from a local artist, and then all of a sudden I had lots of people joining in,” Stephanie explains. “Over the last few years there’s been hundreds of artists and creative organisations using the hashtag, and we have just got to 10,000 shares on there. It’s become a really popular way for me to discover new people and for creatives to support like-minded individuals.”

IMAGES Stephanie’s initiative to support local creatives, The Trove Cambridge, has gone from strength to strength in recent years

“I get lots of feedback saying this is a great thing I’m doing”

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BOOK CLUB

CAMBRIDGE EDI T ION

BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

A MURDER WITNESSED OVER SKYPE OPENS THIS VERY MODERN THRILLER, BUT DON’T BE FOOLED – IT HAS ALL THE ELEMENTS OF A CLASSIC, TIMELESS WHODUNNIT WATCHING FROM THE DARK BY GYTHA LODGE

Gytha’s previous book, She Lies in Wait – also featuring Jonah and his team – was a huge success, reaching the Sunday Times Top Ten list and getting picked up by the Richard and Judy Book Club. For Gytha, one of the interesting challenges of this second published novel is measuring it against the success of her first – or trying to resist the comparison. “You get so much love and support as a debut writer and I have lovely, lovely publishers who are excellent at handholding as well as editing and

atching From the Dark opens spectacularly, with Aidan Poole logging on to Skype to catch up with

marketing; it’s the perfect combination. But with the second novel, just getting it into the same space as the first is actually quite hard,” she says. “I think I didn’t quite believe the publishers when they said second books never sell as many as first books, but now I understand. You have to accept that it won’t always sell quite as quickly – but I’ve had really lovely reactions so far, which has been grand.” Writing a so-called ‘difficult second novel’ wasn’t quite the challenge you might expect, in part because Gytha’s first

his girlfriend Zoe, then finding himself witnessing what appears to be a violent struggle and her off-camera murder. But why does he hesitate to call the police? This is the second detective novel from Cambridge-based author Gytha Lodge, and the thriller unfolds in all directions as the slippery truth evades both the police and the reader in turn.

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published book was in fact the seventh novel she had completed. “Lots of them were terrible, and I’d put them aside. But there were lots of learning points, so I didn’t find the writing a problem – partly because of having come from a very long background of writing,” she explains. Gytha has always written, both prose and plays, and feels that her background in playwriting adds a great deal to her fiction. “I hope it does, anyway,” she says. “I learned a huge amount writing plays: particularly making dialogue believable – there’s nowhere to hide when actors say your words, it either does or doesn’t work.” Alongside her own writing endeavours, Gytha studied English at Cambridge University, then – after winning multiple awards as a playwright – looked towards the University of East Anglia’s famous creative writing course to take her to the next level. “I thought if I went there I would learn and focus a lot, and it would really help me,” Gytha says. “Then I slightly freaked about putting myself down to do just pure prose, because I didn’t have the same track record that I had in plays. Right on the edge of everything, I decided: I’m going to apply for scriptwriting and then do some of the prose stuff on the side. It was an interesting decision, because I think actually I would have learned a huge amount from the prose course; they have an incredibly good route into agencies, publishers and so on, in a way that you don’t necessarily get out of scriptwriting.” “What I did learn, though, was how to pitch – and that was the single best thing that could have happened to me at that stage in my career,” Gytha says. “Between my first and second year I went to an event in London, which turned out to be awful – it was just lots and lots of people asking a panel of agents questions, but all they were really doing was talking about their own books, and the agents were looking increasingly disinterested – and I just thought: ‘What’s the point of being here?’.”

my day until I’ve left. So normally, I do the school run and then pedal on from there into town. I go and settle myself in one of the early-opening cafes, and I move to one of the larger cafes or somewhere that’s atmospheric. If it’s a nice independent cafe, I will buy lots of things – if it’s not, I tend to bring my own teabag and ask for hot water,” she grins. Gytha really enjoys the planning stage of embarking on a new novel. “I have a big notebook with blank pages, and coloured pens, and I draw character plans, charts of timings and clues, a chapter plan – I absolutely love it,” she says. “I have to know the ending. I say that, but in my second book I did change the ending! Once I started writing, it was obvious it needed to go in a different direction, and you have to listen to that as a writer. If you realise it’s just not making sense, or the way you set the characters out means they wouldn’t do what you’d planned – that makes perfect sense to me. So, I changed it.” Gytha finds her maps extremely useful to keep track of the more complex and twisting plots and multiple perspectives

Gytha had already written the first three chapters of a book that she was pleased with, along with a synopsis – so she marched out of the event, looked up the three literary agencies closest to the event’s location, and handed her work in at their front desks. “It obviously wasn’t polished, by any means, but there was enough there that the agents thought there was potential. I got the first reply the next day, asking for the rest of my book,” Gytha grins. “And then I got another reply – and then I obviously thought – ‘Oh my God, I need to write the rest of the book!’ So I then wrote the rest of the book that week, in a... frenzy of ridiculousness.” Although the hectic pace required to deliver that first book isn’t a recommended approach, Gytha still writes as often and as frequently as she can. “I just write all the time, basically,” she says, “except when I’m doing sport or having a nap – and I would say ‘or eating’, though I normally write and eat at the same time. But I always need to leave the house to write. I really hate feeling like I’m stuck at home: I have this awful feeling of not actually having started

LOOK OUT FOR THE CAMBRIDGE EDITION BOOK CLUB STICKERS IN HEFFERS AND GET MONEY OFF OUR MONTHLY PICK HEFFERS IS LOCATED AT 20 TRINITY STREET, CAMBRIDGE, BLACKWELLS.CO.UK

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IMAGE Gytha Lodge is based in Cambridge, and does most of her writing in various of the city’s cafes

“I have a big notebook with blank pages, and coloured pens, and I draw character charts”

lot of experience of that, with a previous abusive partner of mine. It was fascinating to look at that as a professional advantage for Jonah – he’s someone who is that good at what he does, when he needs to be, because he can basically imitate his father for a bit: but he really dislikes the fact that he does it.” “I think that’s interesting, and hopefully quite real – because I think when you can be that mean to somebody, it must come from somewhere. And then because Jonah became a bit less angry, and he had that guilt and that calmness as well – we started to really like each other. So I thought – you can stay. We’ll do a series,” she laughs. Covering the inexplicable complexity and often competitive nature of female friendship, the self-immolating nature of permanent people-pleasing, and the lives and fears of the detectives trying to solve the mystery, this page-turner of a novel is intricately and intelligently plotted, and keeps you guessing right up to its gripping close: it is bound to be one of this spring’s unmissable reads.

difficult time for us both – we both calmed down in the second draft. I realised he didn’t make any sense at first, so I went back and thought, ‘what do I really want to get out of this guy? What is it that makes him tick?’ I’d got someone who basically was, at that point, just tearing into people in interviews, and I thought, well, that’s fine because he can do that at the right time, but the rest of the time he’s not that person. So I started thinking about: what makes someone able to do that? And what is it in their past that makes them behave like that?” Out of this thinking came the notion that Gytha’s fictional detective’s behaviour could be an indicator of a very difficult childhood, and an emotionally abusive parent. “What occurred to me, rather strangely, was that actually, perfect interrogation is basically abuse, if you do it right,” she says. “You’re essentially twisting people to say things. You’re undermining their self confidence at the right time, so that they panic – you’re doing all the things that a really awful and abusive person would do. Actually, I had quite a

that have become a trademark of her fiction. “The more moving parts of a plot that you’re holding in your head, the more having a basic map is really useful – more so when it comes to crime, because you really do have to think about those little moments when a clue is revealed, in a way that you don’t have to if you’re writing any other format. Although having said that, I’ve just been reading Marian Keyes’ latest novel, Grown Ups , which is superb. I always forget this about Marian Keyes until I read her again, but in some ways her books are a bit like mystery novels: there’s a lot of information that’s hidden, and you’re actually untangling it and revealing it through a series of conversations or flashbacks as you read.” Another feature of Gytha’s fiction is that her female victims are bestowed with personality, depth and three fully formed dimensions. The same can be said for her troubled detective, DCI Jonah Sheens, and his policing team. It turns out that Jonah was quite an angry character when Gytha first started writing him. “Though I think I was quite angry as well,” she says. “It was a

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LOCKDOWN L I FE Keep Cambridge & Carry On HOW CAN WE, AS A COMMUNITY, FIGHT BACK IN THE ONGOING CRISIS? FROM TIPS ON SHOPPING LOCAL IN A LOCKDOWN TO INFORMATION ON COMMUNITY ACTION GROUPS AND CHARITABLE INITIATIVES – WE’VE GOT SOME IDEAS FOR YOU

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5 ways to support your community ALTHOUGH THE CORONAVIRUS IS CAUSING CHAOS, THERE ARE STILL WAYS THAT YOU CAN HELP OUT IN YOUR COMMUNITY. HERE ARE FIVE WAYS YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE AT THIS DIFFICULT TIME

1 SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL FOOD BANK Panic-buying and stockpiling as a reaction to the coronavirus has meant a drastic drop in donations to local food banks. Staff and volunteers may be unavailable due to measures put in place to stop the spread of the virus, meaning that food charities are being faced with an unprecedented level of uncertainty. With the demand for food bank services expected to increase in the coming weeks, as people lose income from falling ill or having to self-isolate, food banks need your support to be able to cope with the record levels of need for emergency food. uk.virginmoneygiving.com/KalKarim 2 JOIN A MUTUAL AID GROUP In this time of crisis, it’s great to see that there are plenty of community groups coming together to offer help and support. Find out how you can volunteer your time to those who need it most by joining a coronavirus mutual aid group on Facebook, which will keep you up to date with the needs of your community. facebook.com/groups

Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust has launched an appeal called ‘Help your hospital’ to raise funds to support Addenbrooke’s hospital and its staff during the coronavirus crisis. Although we are all being asked to self-isolate or work from home at the moment, this is not possible for NHS staff. They continue to be there for us in this difficult time, going above and beyond to make sure that every patient is cared for. With Addenbrooke’s and the Rosie maternity hospitals being placed under increased pressure during the current crisis, Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust is asking for your help to maintain the high level of care it delivers to its patients. Shelly Thake, Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust CEO, said: “It’s incredible how many people want to support our fantastic NHS staff. With their support we can help the hospital and its patients through these uncertain times.” To donate, head to the appeal website at helpyourhospital.co.uk. You can also text NHSHEROES 5 to 70085 to donate £5, or NHSHEROES 10 to donate £10. act4addenbrookes.org.uk HELP YOUR HOSPITAL

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4 DONATE BLOOD

It may seem counter-intuitive, but if you’re still feeling fit and healthy, you can absolutely still give blood during this time. In fact, it is essential that people keep donating blood in order to save lives. If you’re unsure about whether you are eligible to give blood at the moment, you can check online at blood.co.uk

3 SUPPORT LOCAL,

INDEPENDENT BUSINESSES A lot of local businesses are struggling during this time, since

many people are self-isolating and social distancing themselves to avoid catching or spreading coronavirus. But there are still ways you can help! You can order takeaways from local restaurants, or purchase vouchers to use at Cambridge shops and eateries at a later date. By shopping local, you can help independent businesses stay afloat.

5 HELP YOUR NEIGHBOURS It can be easy to think only of your own friends and family at this time, but there are lots of people in your local area who are self-isolating without any support. Some people, especially the elderly, are not able to access the resources available online, but you can still let them know that you can help. Forms, like the one below, can be printed off, filled in and delivered to neighbours who may be struggling to cope during self-isolation. Letting people know you’re there if they need you can make all the difference.

If you are self-isolating, I can help.

My name is

I live locally at

My phone number is

If you are self-isolating due to Covid-19 I can help with: Picking up shopping Posting mail Urgent supplies

A friendly phone call

Just call or text me and I’ll do my best to help you (for free!)

Coronavirus is contagious. Please take every precaution to ensure you are spreading only kindness. Avoid physical contact (2m distance). Wash your hands regularly. Items should be left on your doorstep.

#ViralKindness

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Self-isolation saviours HOW ARE YOU PLANNING TO SPEND YOUR TIME STUCK INSIDE? FROM BOOK DELIVERIES AND CRAFT SUPPLIES TO GOURMET TREATS AND WINE – LOCAL BUSINESSES ARE ON HAND WITH SOME LITTLE LUXURIES TO HELP GET YOU THROUGH...

GET BOOKED UP One thing you’ll definitely need to get you through quarantine is some great books. Need inspiration? We’ve got plenty of recommendations on our website at cambsedition.co.uk (search ‘Book Club’), but if you can’t leave the house to go out and buy them, don’t panic. If you can’t make it to Trinity Street, Heffers can post books to you: call 01223 463200 or email customerorders@heffers.co.uk with details of your order. For Saffron Walden dwellers, indie booksellers Harts can help: call the shop on 01799 524552. Payment can be made over the phone and the books will be delivered straight to your door.

WINE TIME Nights out at bars might be a thing of distant memory, but that doesn’t mean you have to drink subpar booze. Ever the innovators, the team from drinks shop Thirsty has launched a virtual marketplace, stocking treats from their expansive selection of craft beer and great wine, alongside Brew Project coffee, Guerrilla Kitchen DIY bao kits and more. Indie wine specialist Thorne Wines, meanwhile, has a huge and delicious selection of premium wines, and will deliver for free around Cambridge, plus it’s offering ‘care packages’ of great wines that include a tip for your favourite restaurant.

TAXI HEROES Although you’ll likely not be needing them to get out and about, Camcab is still putting its fleet of taxis to good use and supporting the most vulnerable members of the community. The company released a statement saying: “We are dedicated to supporting our local community and valued customers. If you are 70 or over and in need of groceries, then we are here to help! We will transfer your groceries from the supermarket to your doorstep. This service is free of charge during this difficult time. Call us on 01223 704704 and find out how we can help.” camcab.co.uk

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GOURMET TREATS Even – perhaps especially – in quarantine, we all need a little treat. For gourmet delicacies from around the world, check out Culinaris, which is currently offering home delivery to postcodes CB1 to CB5 (call 07885377598 to place your order). This friendly little shop has got artisan chocolate bars, cheeses, charcuterie, relishes and loads more besides. Our local farm shop and deli, The Gog, is also levelling up its shopping options by introducing a delivery service, plus local cake maker extraordinaire Afternoon Tease has returned when we needed her most with cake boxes (available from Vanderlyle restaurant, order via Tock) that feature her chocolate Guinness cake, brownies, cheese scones and carrot cake. GO FOR KNIT Ever thought about taking up knitting? Well, if you’re stuck in the house for long enough, you just might. Sew Knit Craft is offering postage deals on all of its items at the moment - and it’s going to keep delivering for as long as it can. You can get free delivery within ten miles of CB1, and free delivery nationwide for all orders over £25. Head to the website for your fix of crafty goodness. sewknitcraftltd.com DAILY BREAD The city’s bakeries have really come into their own during this crisis, and you’re spoiled for choice when it comes to choosing where to pick up your lockdown loaves. Chesterton’s Stir Bakery, always a popular choice for its delicious sourdough, rye loaves and handmade cakes and

“Even in quarantine, we all need a little treat”

pastries, has launched daily deliveries during the crisis: dropping off to CB1, CB2, CB3, CB4, Histon, Impington, Girton, Milton and Cottenham. Delivery is free, and the minimum order for delivery is £10. Cult Ely bakery Grain Culture is also raising its game, increasing its Bake Shop opening hours to Tuesdays to Saturdays from 8.30am (with social distancing measures in place), and delivering to Shelford Deli. Fitzbillies has closed its branches to the public, but is focusing on deliveries, which can be ordered via its website. And finally, Maison Clement, an artisan bakery with branches in Newnham and Hills Road, has launched ‘Clement on the bike’, delivering tasty loaves and freshly baked sweet treats to the city’s residents by bicycle. AND RELAX… If you’re worried about your yoga classes being cancelled, Satyam Yoga Wellbeing Centre has a solution. It’s running its vinyasa classes via Zoom, so you can practice yoga with your instructor in your living room. Just sign up to the classes on the MindBody app, download the Zoom app, and you will be sent a password link to access the class you want. satyamyogacentre.co.uk

IMAGES (Clockwise from top left) Bodegas Emilio Lustau East India Solera sherry from Thorne Wines, which is offering free Cambridge delivery. Luigi Guffanti Robiola 3 Latti cheese from Culinaris, which is offering home delivery for postcodes CB1 to CB5. Sunflower seeded rye from Stir Bakery in Chesterton, which is delivering bread and baked goods direct to CB1 through to CB4 addresses, as well as Histon, Impington, Girton, Milton and Cottenham with a minimum delivery of £10

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Quarantine with kids NOW THAT SCHOOLS ARE CLOSED, MANY OF YOU ARE FINDING YOURSELVES STUCK AT HOME WITH THE KIDS FOR THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE. HERE ARE FIVE IDEAS TO HELP KEEP THEM OCCUPIED OVER THE COMING DAYS AND WEEKS

REDGATE CODING CLUB Cambridge-based software company Redgate is launching a new Coding Club for kids, with the hope of keeping children engaged in STEM subjects while they’re stuck at home. Redgate’s development manager, Ben Mancini, says: “We love developing software and sharing how we do it. STEM subjects are super important to us, so if just a few classes we offer create an interest for one child, we’ll be delighted.” Aimed at children aged six to 14, the Coding Club workshops are running every Friday via video call and Scratch, led by the team at Redgate. The first workshop is due to take place on Friday 3 April, and you can register your interest by filling in an online form. All of the workshops are free of charge. bit.ly/RedgateCE

BBC TEACH A lifesaver when it comes to curriculum- linked activities, BBC Teach has got plenty of video resources available to help parents out in this challenging time. The site spans 22 subjects, arranged by age group, and covers early years through to GCSEs. The most recent campaign, Super Movers, is a joint effort from the BBC and the Premier League, designed to get a generation of pupils up and moving while they learn. Available for both Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2, the easy-to-follow active learning videos cover the basics (Maths, English and Science), as well as modern foreign languages, PSHE and virtual PE classes, to help keep your kids active and occupied while they’re at home. You can find all of them over on the BBC website. bbc.co.uk/teach

SCOUTS ACTIVITIES The Scouts Association has just launched over 100 stay-at-home activities, games and craft ideas to keep your kids entertained and help them learn new skills while in self-isolation. Chief Scout Bear Grylls hopes the activities will help children channel their energy towards active engagement and learning while schools are closed. ‘The Great Indoors’ resource features a vast selection of indoor activities that kids can do at home over the coming days and weeks, ranging from 15-minute fun to hour-long activities, including origami challenges, snap-happy camera skill sessions, calendar making and miniature twig-raft building. Check out the Scouts website for the full list of available activities. scouts.org.uk

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“If you’re already tired of hearing the words “I’m bored” every five minutes”

HOBBYCRAFT CRAFTING PROJECTS If you’re already tired of hearing the words “I’m bored” every five minutes, Hobbycraft can come to your rescue. It has a seemingly endless selection of children’s crafts activities on its website, with everything from simple paper crafts, to nature-inspired activities and painting projects. Depending on how much time – or patience – you have, there are speedy five- to fifteen-minute projects to complete, or you can choose to craft the whole day away. There are plenty of themed activities available, too, so you can opt for some seasonal spring crafts, or a fun Easter activity. You can also shop for craft materials on the Hobbycraft website, and stock up on your creative supplies for self-isolation – delivery is free on orders over £20. blog.hobbycraft.co.uk/craft-ideas

FREE AUDIOBOOKS To help people through self-isolation, Audible is granting access to hundreds of children’s audiobooks free of charge. In a statement on its website, Audible says: “For as long as schools are closed, we’re open. Kids everywhere can instantly stream an incredible collection of stories, including titles across six different languages, that will help them continue dreaming, learning, and just being kids.” There are now an extensive number of titles available for anyone to listen to for free, from The Return of Sherlock Holmes to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland , read by the likes of Thandie Newton and Scarlett Johansson. You can browse all of the audiobooks on Audible’s website, which also includes stories in Spanish, German,

IMAGES Whether your kids want to learn a new skill, brush up on their schoolwork, spend time crafting or listen to a free audiobook, there is a whole host of fun and free activities for children who can’t go to school at the moment

French, Italian and Mandarin. stories.audible.com/start-listen

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RECI PES F ROM AME L I E • LOCKDOWN TAKEAWAY SPECI AL • CHE F ’ S TAB L E

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ere we are, together, in the most interesting of times. My overriding thought is that by the time you read this, the situation

CHEF’S TABLE

WITH THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY FACING AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE, CHEF ALEX RUSHMER CONSIDERS HOW HIS SECTOR MIGHT FIGHT BACK W hat next?

will have progressed significantly from my current location in (what will become) the quaint past. Right now, talk and speculation are all I have to work with. At present, restaurants, bars and pubs in the UK remain open for business, but a glance over to continental Europe or the United States yields a grim inevitably that looks a lot like curfews, restricted opening hours and forced closures for all hospitality businesses. This is likely to occur within the next two weeks for an unknowable length of time. The impact on all of us will be immeasurable and far-reaching. Those habits, those indulgences, those convenient grab-and-go lunches and those dinners out might, for some time, be memories and hopes, as ethereal as flight and frictionless travel. Everyone you know that works in the hospitality sector is currently trying their very best to stay sane and solvent, from the barista

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“The message is simple and succinct: support your local businesses, in whatever ways you can”

takeaway foods, dropping a note through the door or tweeting in solidarity. We will have to be creative and think of new ways to serve you. We will adapt and evolve and make changes where we want to and need to. We will cling on for as long as we can, desperately trying to do what we love and make you happy and keep you fed. So, yes, times are interesting. Unprecedented, even. But one day they won’t be. And when

up late doing what they love: creating delicious food, serving great drinks and striving to give amazing service. Hospitality is now a lifeblood that runs through the veins of a city that just a decade ago was mocked for its lack of character and independence. You could eat out every day for a year and still not take in all of Cambridge’s vibrant food scene. King’s College might bring the tourists, but the cafes, bars, restaurants, and food trucks and stalls make sure they stay here for longer than 15 minutes. The message, then, is simple and succinct: support your local businesses, all of them, in whatever ways you can, whether it is buying vouchers, purchasing

who steams the milk for your morning cappuccino on the way to the station, to the bartender who knows exactly how you like your Friday-night cocktail. We are all in the same boat. We live to serve and the prospect of that avenue being closed to us for an undefined period is currently too terrifying to contemplate. Working from home in self-isolation is categorically not an option for us. Cambridge has come so far in the last ten years and we now have a food and drink scene that thrives and pulses and vibrates with an energy and character that few other cities of our size do. It’s driven by hard-working and passionate individuals who wake up early and stay

that time comes, we’ll all want to go out for dinner. Let’s make sure we still can.

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Takeawa y he r oes THE BEST INDIE EATERIES THAT WILL DELIVER WHILE YOU'RE SELF-ISOLATING AND ON LOCKDOWN!

Created and run by Cambridge locals Simon and Michelle Cheney, Bread & Meat specialises in gourmet sandwiches, along with the Canadian classic poutine – french fries with cheese curds and gravy, anyone? – and everything is cooked from scratch using locally sourced ingredients. It also offers organic, sustainably sourced coffee from Monmouth, and milkshakes made with award-winning ice cream from Suffolk. The menu is on the Bread & Meat website, and everything is available to order on Deliveroo. breadandmeat.co.uk BREAD & MEAT

DOPPLEGANGER

Championing plant-based eating, Doppleganger’s burgers, sides and shakes may be meat- and dairy-free, but this restaurant doesn’t compromise on flavour. The Dopplefillets and Dopplepatties come loaded with tasty toppings, signature sauces and are perfect accompanied with the air-fried fries. What’s more, along with a full gluten-free menu, there’s also the option to order bunless burgers, so coeliacs certainly have something to celebrate! Order online for collection or delivery via the

website, or call 01223 665917. dopplegangerburger.co.uk

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THE TIFFIN TRUCK

Inspired by Indian street food favourites, The Tiffin Truck’s menu is full of home-cooked hot meals that champion authentic Indian flavours. You can choose a variety of light bites as a satisfying snack, or go for one of the selection of mains for a filling lunch or dinner – accompanied by one of the delicious naan bread options, of course. Order by calling 012233 66111, or via Deliveroo. thetiffintruck.co.uk

AL CASBAH

Al Casbah’s fantastic Algerian- inspired food has made it a firm takeaway favourite on Mill Road. The menu includes meze dips, tagines and couscous dishes, offering a mix of traditional and modern Mediterranean cuisine. There are also grilled meats and fish, cooked on an open charcoal grill. There are often discounts available, so you can get money off your total bill, and delivery is free on all orders. Find the menu over on the website, and order by calling 01223 579500. al-casbah.com

If you’re ever in need of a burger fix, Steak & Honour is always a good shout. The deceptively simple menu features some of the best burgers you’re likely to come across, and the chefs also like to switch up their offerings on the day. Although Steak & Honour is currently closed in response to government advice, make sure to keep an eye on social media for more updates as the situation develops. steakandhonour.co.uk STEAK & HONOUR

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Cherry Box Pizza is your one-stop shop for all things pizza and pasta. The takeaway menu has plenty of tasty pizzas, calzones, salads and sides on offer, as well as alcoholic drinks and desserts. You can also choose between three different pasta types: penne, tagliatelle or spaghetti. Check out the extensive menu over on the Cherry Box Pizza website, and order online or by calling 01223 511929. cherryboxpizzaonline.com CHERRY BOX PIZZA

BUTCH ANNIE’S Butch Annie’s uncomplicated burger menu showcases the very best prime cuts of beef supplied by a Royal Warrant-holding butcher in Scotland. The restaurant offers ten hopelessly satisfying creations, from the Classic burger (cheese, crispy fried onions and ketchup) all the way to the mustard aioli-adorned B. B. King. All the burgers are served with the famous (and top secret!) steak sauce. Find the menu on the Butch Annie’s website, and call 01223 361792 to order. butchannies.com

GATTUSO'S

One of Cambridge’s most popular Italian restaurants, Gattuso’s Trattoria has been bringing exceptional home-style Italian cooking to the city since 2015. The pizzas are prepared with handmade, hand-stretched bases, and are made with high- quality, locally sourced ingredients. Gattuso’s also offers traditional Sicilian seafood dishes and a variety of desserts. Order by calling 01223 246665, or online via Just Eat or Deliveroo. gattusostrattoria.co.uk

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DINNERS ON DEMAND AMID THE CURRENT CRISIS, MANY OF THE CITY’S RESTAURANTS ARE TRANSFORMING INTO TAKEAWAYS, SO YOU CAN STILL GET YOUR HANDS ON THEIR FABULOUS FOOD THE HAYMAKERS The Haymakers pub is now delivering pizza at lunch and dinner time to the local Chesterton area. You can order and pay for everything over the phone by calling 01223 311077, and if you prefer or need no contact, just let the team know and they can leave your food by the door. The pub is also offering to deliver pints fromMilton Brewery, and there’s even the option to order a polypin – that’s 32 pints! – which, as long as it’s kept cool, should easily last a week or two. facebook.com/cambridgehaymakers DON PASQUALE Long-established as a hub of Italian fine dining in the heart of Cambridge, locals will be pleased to hear that Don Pasquale is offering a takeaway menu at the moment. The traditional and fresh pizzas and pastas are much- loved in the city, and you can now order them to your home. Call 01223 367063 to order for home delivery or collection – and you can also pick up dried pasta, tinned goods and coffee from the restaurant if you’ve been unable to get any in the shops. donpasquale.co.uk

Having travelled to over 20 countries to sample their burger offerings, Chosen Bun’s obsessive search for the perfect patty has left the restaurant with a supreme burger. With a menu bursting with freshness and boasting exclusively ethically sourced meat, you can taste the determination to make the ultimate burger in every bite. Food is available to order for both collection and delivery via the Chosen Bun website. chosenbun.com CHOSEN BUN

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One of Mill Road’s pedigree takeaway restaurants, Prana offers award-winning, authentic Indian cuisine based on a menu that fuses traditional and modern approaches to Indian cooking. With classic family dishes as well as innovative vegetarian and vegan options, Prana is a solid option for anyone after a top-quality Indian takeaway. Head to the website to order food – the restaurant is currently offering a drive-by takeaway collection service – or call on 01223 229988. pranarestaurant.co.uk PRANA

Smokeworks’ low ’n’ slow approach to barbecue cooking has made it a takeaway staple for many Cambridge foodies. All of the meat is smoked in Smokeworks’ own Cambridge smokery over British kiln-dried oak, and all of the sauces are made from scratch in the Smokeworks kitchen. Keep an eye on social media for when the restaurant reopens, as it is currently closed in accordance with government guidelines. smokeworks.co.uk SMOKEWORKS

Bringing the most delicious and vibrant flavours of Thailand to your plate, The House offers excellent authentic Thai cuisine. The chef spent time sharpening his skills in some of the best kitchens across Thailand, so you can be sure that you’re getting the real deal. Everything is home-made using top-quality ingredients, all freshly prepared and cooked to perfection. You can also get 10% discount on all takeaway and delivery orders at the moment. Order for delivery or collection by calling 01223 357599, or for delivery via Deliveroo. thehouseauthenticthai.com/cambridge

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LA LATINA BUSTAURANTE

THE PLOUGH Serving up locally sourced, seasonal food, this rustic gastropub is ready to take on the challenge of the coronavirus. The Plough’s takeaway menu includes pizzas, pasta and pub grub favourites, such as fish and chips and sausage and mash. All orders are available for collection, although a delivery option is also available for those living in surrounding areas. You can find the takeaway menu on The Plough’s Instagram, and order by VANDERLYLE ‘Dinners in demand’ would probably be a more fitting title for any other mention of Vanderlyle (as the restaurant is usually booked up months in advance), so the announcement of a Vanderlyle to-go service is certainly causing a stir. You can order from a regularly changing menu of family meals – available for two or four people for collection via Tock – with recent hits including a vegetable lasagne. The restaurant is also acting as a pick-up point for some of the city’s finest food producers, including Afternoon Tease, Calverley’s Brewery, Flourish Produce, Wylde Sky Brewing and Thorne Wines. Pick-up times are available throughout the day, and the restaurant will be open seven days a week. exploretock.com/vanderlyle calling 01954 210489. theploughcoton.co.uk

La Latina Bustaurante’s unique appeal lies not only in the location – the clue’s in the name: on a bus! – but also in the excellent selection of food. The empanadas, arepas and tostones are sure to bring the Latin flavours of South American street food directly into your home. You can order for delivery via Deliveroo, or by calling 01223 213171. facebook.com/ lalatinabustaurante

Another takeaway favourite on Mill Road, Tradizioni serves simple and tasty Italian dishes. Freshly-made pizzas, pastas, focaccias and sides are all on the menu, as well as a selection of desserts (including a Nutella pizza!). The portions are always generous, but if devouring a whole pizza sounds intimidating, Tradizioni also offers all of the flavour combinations in half sizes. And you can get 30% off on orders over £20 if you order online. Visit the website to order food, or give them a call on 01223 245966. tradizionirestaurant.com TRADIZIONI

ALL INFORMATION WAS CORRECT WHEN WE SENT CAMBRIDGE EDITION TO PRESS, BUT THINGS ARE CHANGING ALL THE TIME, SO PLEASE CHECK ONLINE OR OVER THE PHONE WITH RESTAURANTS BEFORE YOU ORDER

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