Cambridge Edition February 2021 - Web

YOU R MON T H L Y F I X OF

LOCA L L I F E

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STEPPING UP THE COMMUNITY HEROES MAKING A DIFFERENCE

LOCKDOWN VALENTINE’S IDEAS, VIRTUAL CULTURE, NEW OPENINGS & MORE

WELCOME

t least the weather’s lovely!” we chorused back in March. “Can you imagine how grim this lockdown would be in winter?” Boy, did we find out in January: a month of bleak skies, bleaker news stories and the looming awfulness of

EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Editorial assistant Frances McNaughton 01223 499469 francesmcnaughton@bright-publishing.com Editorial director Roger Payne Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Sub editor Elisha Young Junior sub editor Jack Nason ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Lucy McNally 01223 492248 lucymcnally@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Charlotte Griffiths, Andrew Tucker, Alex Rushmer & Anna Taylor DESIGN & PRODUCTION Senior designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

the second peak – all served with a helping of the usual January blues on the side. After all that, I’d say we all deserve a treat this month – and a delicious dinner, delivered to your doorstep, is as good a place as any to start. From Levante’s exquisite fresh pasta dishes to Restaurant Twenty- Two’s wow-factor tasting menus, dinner deliveries are levelling up in Cambridge and we’ve got all the delectable details on page 22. Over in

Culture Club (page 9), meanwhile, you can hear from a recently opened florist on Mill Road and discover a new wave of podcasts made right here in Cambridge. Plus, pick up some top fiction picks in our Book Club (page 14). Enjoy the issue and see you next time!

Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

6 ● STARTERS Our top social media pics for February, plus this month’s wish list from local indies 9 ● CULTURE CLUB New openings, Cambridge’s finest podcasts and more to check out this month 14 ● BOOK CLUB Our resident bookwork Charlotte highlights her top new fiction picks 16 ● LOVE IS IN THE AIR Treat your SO to one of these lovely, local treats this Valentine’s Day 18 ● INDIE OF THE MONTH The team from family-run furniture store Angela Reed share their secrets to success 21 ● CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer talks leftovers – and how to transform them into a delicious feast 22 ● DINE-IN DELIGHTS Miss eating out? Check out these new and noteworthy dinner deliveries CONTENTS

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24 ● WEDDINGS Inspiration and ideas from local wedding suppliers we love 26 ● COMMUNITY HEROES Organisations that have made a difference during the past year – and how you can help 30 ● INTERIORS Create a cosy outdoor space in your garden to enjoy all year round: we show you how 33 ● GARDENS Anna, from Anna’s Flower Farm, shares her top tips for this month’s gardening jobs 34 ● PROPERTY Andrew Tucker, partner at Bidwells, advises on how to make your home greener

This month’s cover illustration was created by Lucy Woolcomb , senior designer at Bright Publishing

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STARTERS

@FI.FIELDNOTES

@CLAIRELIONS

@PRETTY_LITTLE_CAMBRIDGE

OUR FAVOURI TE CAMBRIDGE INSTAGRAM PICS OF THE MONTH. HASHTAG # INSTACAMB FOR A CHANCE TO FEATURE !

FOLLOW @CAMBSEDITION ON INSTAGRAM FOR MORE GREAT PICS OF CAMBRIDGE

WOODLAND WONDERS

The Wild Wood Disco recently announced plans for its 2021 event, set to take place 19 June, with a line-up of DJs that includes Norman Jay, Seb Fontaine and Stanton Warriors. The organisers were forced to cancel the main 2020 event – although they did manage to host the socially distanced ‘Spaced Out’ festival – but hope to have things back to full strength by this summer, or as close as restrictions will allow. That means dancing under the trees in the beautiful woodland setting near Linton, great street food, glitter aplenty and a cracking spot for watching the sunset. Tickets are available now, from £58.85, with camping options available. thewildwooddisco.com

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STARTERS

ANTHER AND MOSS BENTHAM CONCRETE POTS £16, Small and Green, via Click It Local

VELVET POMPOM CUSHION £18.95, Angela Reed, Peas Hill

FACE CLUTCH £15, Ark, St Marys Passage

FLAMINGO MAKEUP BAG £22, Lilac Rose, Bridge Street

WYBERT BICYCLE SEAT COVER £9, The Bicycle Collective, via Click It Local

BUMBLE BAR – CEREMONY £6.25, Bumble & Oak, via Click It Local

THIS MONTH’S MUST-HAVES FROM LOCAL INDIES

HOUSE OF DISASTER BOULEVARD GREENHOUSE CUP £17.50, Podarok, Bene’t Street

PPE KIT WITHMASK, SANITISER, WIPES AND A STORAGE POUCH £12, Britmask

THOUSAND BICYCLE HELMET ROSE GOLD

£94, BEG Bicycles, Hemingford Grey

JEWEL GIANT CHECK MOHAIR THROW £109, Angela Reed, Peas Hill

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JEWEL IN THE CROWN

Cambridge’s Harriet Kelsall Bespoke Jewellery was recently honoured at the prestigious Retail Jeweller’s UK Jewellery Awards – this year held virtually – scooping up the prize for Bespoke Jewellery Retailer of the Year, with the judges praising the shop’s “steadfast dedication to customer-led jewellery”. Specialising in designs individually tailored to customers, Harriet Kelsall has a team of talented designers on hand at each of its four locations, and has won numerous awards over the years for its groundbreaking concept of a working design studio combined with eye-catching retail, including Bridal Jewellery Retailer of the Year in 2016 and Boutique Retailer of the Year in 2013. “We couldn’t be happier,” owner and founder Harriet Kelsall says, responding to the latest accolade. “Last year was such a challenging year for everybody, including those of us in non-essential retail. It has been tough but still successful, thanks to our amazing, loyal customers and our brilliant, agile and hard-working team. “This award is such a wonderful prize to win after such a tricky time and we are all even more inspired than ever to keep telling our customers’ love stories and life stories in the form of beautiful bespoke jewellery,” she adds. hkjewellery.co.uk

IN BLOOM Injecting a little colour into our homes and lives when we need it most, The Flower Project has recently opened its virtual doors and begun delivering flowers and plants across the city. Its bricks and mortar shop is located on Mill Road and will be open to punters as soon as restrictions ease, but for now you can visit the website and order online, with deliveries made via bicycle. The focus is on British flowers, with offerings including ‘The Florist Choice Bouquet’ – a handpicked selection of fresh, seasonal flowers wrapped in hessian, complete with a card designed by local illustrator Laura Middleton and a handwritten message to your recipient – plus a range of plants, pots, vases and greetings cards. Owner Clare Cook is passionate about making the business as sustainable as possible, using eco-friendly packaging, delivering on bike and even planting a tree for every order made. “I am so excited to have started a business that includes my passion for flowers and cycling,” she comments. “Opening the shop on Mill Road was a dream come true. The community has been so supportive during lockdowns and we are very grateful.” The Flower Project covers most of the Cambridge area and has an introductory 10% discount (promo code INTRO10) off all flowers and plants until the end of April. theflowerproject.uk

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XXXXXXXXX CULTURE CLUB

EASE THE LOCKDOWN BOREDOM WITH THESE CAMBRIDGE-MADE PODCASTS

1 RELATIVELY

2 CLF PLAYER When the pandemic hit, Cambridge Literary Festival had to move fast to adapt to the brave new world – and from a virtual book club to a fully-online festival, the team has proved fleet of foot in creating fantastic content for us to enjoy at home. Part of the pandemic output was a podcast series, available to listen to via the CLF website and hosted by festival patron and regular chair Alex Clark. These cosy chats are a must for book lovers, featuring writers such Hadley Freeman and former Vogue editor Alexandra Shulman. There’s only six episodes, but there’s more content available via the CFL Player, which hosts hundreds of archived audio and video recordings from the Literary Festival and its sister event, Wimpole History Festival. From André Aciman to Elif Shafak, Tom Kerridge to Colm Tóibín – there’s plenty to stimulate your mind, heart and soul, and you can enjoy unlimited access with a £10 annual subscription fee. For a more interactive experience, check out the CLF Book Club: up for Feb, local author Jill Dawson discusses her book The Crime Writer , with audience members invited to read the book ahead of the event. You can join in with questions on Wednesday 17 February at 7pm, tickets £5. cambridgeliteraryfestival.com

Explore the unique relationships between siblings with recently

launched podcast Relatively, which delves into the family lives of figures including Jess Phillips MP and Davina de Campo. Sometimes sad and often funny, the episodes give listeners an acutely personal glimpse into the guests’ upbringing: embarrassing memories, in-jokes, rivalries, silly nicknames and all. Host Catherine Carr isn’t afraid to ask the tricky questions, interviewing guests both together and separately to discover the connections between them as adults, as well as what it was (really) like growing up together. The first series features historian Dan Snow and his little sister Beck, as well as actor and musician Johnny Flynn and his sister Lillie, while future episodes will see presenter Nicky Campbell talking about his adoption, and author Marian Keyes discussing sibling relationships in her bestselling books. Later in 2021, the podcast will take a sciencey turn, looking at academic research into the importance of siblings and how these relationships shape us as individuals, as well as how dynamics with our brothers and sisters provide a training ground for all our other relationships. relativelypodcast.com

IMAGES Sibling relationships are put under the spotlight in Relatively (top); Alex Clark gets chatty with writers for CLF (above)

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4 BURGER BANTS

“What’s the best burger you’ve ever eaten?” host Charley McKie-Reithoff

asks her guests, leading Cambridge chefs such as Daniel Clifford and Rosie Sykes on a light-hearted, food-filled trip down memory lane. Burgers aren’t the only topic served – though they do feature heavily, which makes sense given that Charley co- owns burger emporium Steak & Honour – but food is at the heart of the episodes, which are bursting with recommendations and anecdotes. Stream the launch episode to hear Charley and Cambridge Edition editor Nicola having a chinwag about the city’s food scene and the origins of S&H. steakandhonour.co.uk

3 IN MY MIND’S EYE

IMAGES Take art to heart with In My Mind’s Eye, courtesy of The FitzwilliamMuseum

What do you see when you picture The Fitzwilliam Museum? That’s

the question at the heart of In My Mind’s Eye, a podcast by the Fitz that launched during the first lockdown. With the help of guests such as author Ali Smith and artist Issam Kourbaj, the podcast explores how works of art continue to exist in our memories and imaginations – even when we cannot see them in person. These rememberings take the listener from the Scottish Highlands to Pakistan, shining a spotlight on everything from soap production in Aleppo to how a 19th-century drawing is now seen in the context of the Black Lives Matter movement. In Ali Smith’s episode, which is the first in the series, the acclaimed writer takes you on a dreamlike journey through the Fitzwilliam’s galleries, pausing at paintings she has known since she first visited the museum as a postgrad in 1985. In episode four, meanwhile, poet and novelist Jackie Kay shares her discovery of Fanny Eaton, the Jamaican- born artist’s model for the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood who features in Simeon Solomon’s painting The Mother of Moses . The illuminating series is produced and presented by Carmen Pryce, and you can dive straight in via The Fitzwilliam Museum’s website. fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

5 HISTORY OF IDEAS Get your grey matter working with a listen to History Of Ideas, the new podcast series from the phenomenally clever bunch behind Talking Politics. Hosted by Cambridge University professor David Runciman, the series aims to help listeners make sense of what’s happening in the world, by exploring seminal ideas and the people who had them. Whether learning about Mary Wollstonecraft’s protofeminism or Hobbes’ Leviathan , you’re in the safest of hands with Runciman, who gently guides listeners through dense thickets of political theory. The series has enjoyed huge audiences so far, with more than a million downloads to date, and there are 12 fresh episodes dropping this month to get you through lockdown. talkingpoliticspodcast.com/history-of-ideas

IMAGE Burger Bants host and Steak & Honour co-founder Charley McKie-Reithoff, with her husband Leo

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CULTURE CLUB

1 SPEEDY HOME DELIVERIES CAN BE LOCAL AND ETHICAL Before Covid came along, our options for ultra-quick deliveries of food and products were limited to the likes of Deliveroo, Uber Eats and Amazon – all global companies that have come under fire for their working practices. But cometh the pandemic, cometh the plucky delivery start-ups, reporting for duty to bring the best of Cambridge’s shops and restaurants to your doorstep. Foodstuff, which launched during the first lockdown in March, has a mission of giving independent eateries a fairer deal in the delivery marketplace, working alongside favourites like Aromi and Nanna Mexico, while Click It Local has proved a hit for its same-day deliveries from indie outlets such as Malloy’s Craft Butchery and Calverley’s Brewery. Both companies deliver via bicycle, so as well as supporting indie businesses, they’re eco-friendly too! 2 MEAL KITS ARE AMAZING When dining out became impossible, Cambridge eateries stepped up to the plate with innovative solutions to getting their food to our tables. Particular highlights included Steak & Honour’s DIY burger kits (pictured below), Vanderlyle’s cook-at-home veggie feasts and Pint Shop At Home, a range

of oven-ready homemade pies, doughnut bread pudding (yum!), ‘vegan date night’ dinners and more. Absolutely the next best thing to a meal out. 3 WE’LL QUEUE FOR GELATO AND BREAD When Jack’s Gelato reopened its doors, the queues were huge – we mean really huge. Whenever the hatch was open, you could virtually guarantee a chain of customers that snaked down half of Bene’t Street; in fact, the business was enjoying such a boom that it opened a second brand on All Saint’s Passage. Also proving to be queue-worthy was Grain Culture in Ely, which (if Instagram Stories are to believed) welcomes an army of bread lovers each Saturday morning, queuing – in a socially distanced fashion – for as far as the eye can see. 4 THE GRASS AT KING’S COLLEGE IS THE CITY’S BEST PICNIC SPOT If you were lucky enough to enjoy the elicit thrill of a Pimm’s on the lawn

outside this famous college last summer, we’re sure you’ll agree that it’s got it all: spectacular views, people watching and top-notch takeaways from Cambridge Wine Merchants. Now that the students and porters have returned, sitting on the grass is back to being strictly forbidden and the whole thing feels a bit like a fever dream… 5 WE’RE REALLY LUCKY TO LIVE HERE Objectively, of course, we knew this already. Cambridge is city that lives in the imagination of the world; images of its grand architecture and punt- dotted river unmistakably belonging to the place we call home. But with the ‘great pause’ came an opportunity to really appreciate Cambridge’s charms, and reflect on how fortunate we were to spend our government-sanctioned daily exercise pedalling past handsome colleges or meandering through gorgeous Grantchester. The past year has made many of us fall in love with the city all over again.

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CULTURE CLUB

CAMBRIDGE EDI T ION

GET YOUR LITERARY FIX WITH A ROUND-UP OF NEW FICTION TO ENJOY THIS FEBRUARY

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

BY C L TAYLOR HER LAST HOLIDAY

BY GYTHA LODGE LIE BESIDE ME

Sometimes you just need a book that you can chomp into and finish in one sitting, and if that’s what you’ve been looking for – C L Taylor is the author for you. A new book from this megastar of the thriller world is always a hotly anticipated event, and Her Last Holiday is no exception: it’s packed with dynamic, highly developed characters, brilliantly unexpected twists that just keep on coming, as well as a totally bizarre – but therefore completely believable – set-up. Two years ago, Fran’s sister Jenna disappeared while on a wellness retreat in Malta, and is presumed dead. Two other people died the same day due to the negligence of the charismatic Tom, the ‘Soul Shrink’ who led the life- changing experience. Having now served his time in prison, he’s busily setting up a new retreat in Wales, so – encouraged by her grief-stricken mother – Fran conceals her identity and signs up for the Soul Shrink’s latest experience, to try and reach the truth about Jenna. But who’s actually calling the shots? Grab a blanket and your favourite bar of chocolate, and settle in for a ride…

Cambridge-based author Gytha Lodge also has a new novel that hits the shelves this spring. Lie Beside Me is the next chapter in her series featuring detective Jonah Sheen, and is just as compelling as you’d expect from any work by this masterful plotter. The stage for Lie Beside Me is brilliantly set when a young woman wakes up hungover and discovers a man lying next to her. There are two things that immediately alarm her about this situation: firstly, the man isn’t her husband and, secondly, he appears to be dead. From that explosive opening, this pacy and intricately- woven thriller continues at speed. The bewildered wife Louise quickly becomes Detective Sheen’s main suspect – but did she actually do it? Lies pile on lies as the detective digs deeper and deeper into the complicated web of this poor young woman’s life, uncovering uncomfortable truths via tricky questions that prod at readers as well as the characters, leaving everyone feeling guilty, though not perhaps of the crime being investigated… And if Louise didn’t kill him, then the big question is, who did?

THE STARTUP WIFE BY TAHMIMA ANAM

This rollercoaster of a book begins with computer scientist Asha Ray and her friend Jules pitching their concept for a new social media platform to Utopia, a cutting-edge business incubator in downtown NYC. Their platform is loosely based on her PhD research, expanded by her enigmatic and charismatic husband Cyrus’ interest in a replacement for organised religion. The site creates new rituals for people based on their own beliefs and experiences – generating an appropriately alternative take on a marriage, or a funeral for a pet, or whatever ritual was requested – which can then be shared with others with similar passions. Though that concept might sound interesting enough on its own, it’s the relationships and challenges faced by the trio that make this book such a hit: questions like choosing business over academia, working with friends and partners, and surviving the media whirlwind that accompanies stratospheric success. It’s perfect reading for those involved in start-up life, or anyone who works alongside loved ones.

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BY NEEMA SHAH KOLOLO HILL

“When you’re left with nothing but your secrets, how do you start again?” asks writer Neema Shah on the cover of her first book, Kololo Hill . This moving story – inspired by her family background and events in Uganda in the 70s – follows newly-weds Asha and Pran, uprooted from the family home in Kampala and embarking on a turbulent journey which leads them to suburban England as just two of the 30,000 refugees who resettled in the UK. Abandoning the business he’s worked so hard to build does not come naturally to Pran, and the young couple must adjust to rapidly changing, increasingly terrifying circumstances. This fascinating and eye-opening tale gives a glimpse into both domestic life and the impossible, life-altering decisions faced by the tens of thousands of people forced to flee Uganda under Idi Amin’s dictatorship. Though fiction, Shah’s story is extensively researched and rings extremely true: a beautifully written and deeply affecting debut. “This is like nothing else I’ve ever read”

A modernist, free-form, stream-of-consciousness ride through a day in the life of a nameless young woman who lives and works in central London, this book is like nothing else I’ve ever read. Once you get into the flow of the irregularly structured prose, you quickly start to marvel at this entirely accurate (and at times, very funny) depiction of just how many distracting thoughts pop into someone’s head as they navigate each day. The choice of layout forces you to slow down – to truly appreciate each feeling that the protagonist experiences. Disjointed text and lines leaping across pages insist upon you paying proper attention to the narrator – but it’s not long before her frustration at her perceived lack of success and fury at being on the receiving end of the wrong sort of attention – ‘itemised’, as she puts it, by male coworkers – bubbles to the surface. The ‘little scratch’ of the title doesn’t sound like much, but it’s her self-punishing way of managing the frustration and pain over time. It has scarred her; she is trapped by her trauma, haunted by what’s happened to her and unable to shake the thoughts that echo, Groundhog Day style, through her brain at unprovoked moments. An astonishing and truly unforgettable first novel from journalist Rebecca Watson, this book is absolutely not to be missed, especially for the uncannily accurate depiction of pre-pandemic, humdrum, clock-watching life in a modern office. BY REBECCA WATSON LITTLE SCRATCH

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VAL ENT INE ’ S DAY

FAIRTRADE 9CTWHITE GOLD AND AQUAMARINE WISHBONE PENDANT £495, Harriet Kelsall, Green Street

GORGEOUS GIFTS TO SHOW YOU CARE THIS VALENTINE’S DAY

FAIRTRADE 9CTWHITE GOLD AND AQUAMARINE DROP HOOK EARRINGS £395, Harriet Kelsall, Green Street

NOBLE HOUSE PREPARED

WHITE MARBLE HEART BOARD £26.95, Angela Reed, Peas Hill

PADDYWAX LOVE YA CANDLE £17.50, Lilac Rose, Bridge Street

Dining out might be off the menu, but Noble House Prepared can deliver a romantic feast with no fuss this Valentine’s Day. Whether you opt for spicy harissa and pomegranate chicken, a decadent chateaubriand fillet of beef with dauphinoise potatoes, hand-sliced smoked salmon or vegetarian butternut squash and goat’s cheese pithivier, all dishes come with dessert, plus you can add in a bottle of fizz to make it extra special. Orders should be placed by 10 February, and prices start at £40 for two. noblehouseprepared.com

GLASS BOTTLE OF LONGMATCHES £12.50, Augusta Hope, Fulbourn

BEAUTIFUL BOUQUETWITH RED ROSES AND LILACS from £50, Augusta Hope, Fulbourn

ECO FRIENDLY VALENTINE’S CARD BY CLARE GRAY MAKES £2.65, via Click It Local

ALEX MONROE IN-LINE SCROLL HEART BRACELET £65, Podarok, Bene’t Street

HILL ST. MILK ROCHER BOX £15, via Click It Local

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INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH

INDI E OF THE MONTH A ngela Reed PASSION AND A BELIEF IN OFFERING CUSTOMERS EXCEPTIONAL QUALITY WITH SOMETHING TRULY UNIQUE SETS THIS STORE APART

WORDS BY NICOLA FOLEY

furniture emporium passed down through five generations, Angela Reed is a family business in the truest sense of the term.

Proudly championing beautiful, high- quality homewares, its five-floor flagship store is a sprawling treasure trove of handpicked pieces, from stylish Conran sofas to handmade wooden bookshelves and cabinets. The current custodians are David Reed and his wife Kate, who returned to the fold in 2011 and have helped grow the brand into the thriving operation it is today, with branches in Cambridge and Saffron Walden as well as a successful online shop. “A lot of it is down to passion,” says Kate. “The family has always really believed in the business – it’s never been a chore. It’s always been something that everyone has loved to do. David and I, for example, used to work in professional rugby, but he always knew that he was going to come back and take over the family business, and that was his burning ambition.” Surviving wars, recessions and navigating ever-changing shopping habits is no mean feat, and the company has proved remarkably resilient over the course of its 140-year history, continually repolishing its brand to meet the needs of each new generation. Part of the reason for its success, believes Kate, is a steadfast commitment to exceptional quality and being able to offer customers something

truly unique compared to the big chains that dominate the high street. “I think what sets us apart is that everything is handpicked by us,” she explains. “It’s David picking everything and curating it, and he has a really good eye, as do the people who work around him. We have a good understanding of what our customers will like and what will work. “We know that they look for things that are inspirational and a bit different; things that you’re not going to find in John Lewis. It’s that personal curation – that’s what makes us different.” The pandemic has brought a new set of challenges, forcing the business to temporarily shut down in March last year and revamp its online shop on a much tighter timescale than originally planned. “It’s given us the opportunity to make some much needed changes,” says Kate. “We’ve now looked at digital marketing as a whole and brought in some really good people to help us with that. We’ve been able to broaden our market beyond just local people and we’re now sending around the UK and to Europe, too”. One benefit of lockdowns for a homewares company such as Angela Reed is that it has prompted many of us to spruce up our living spaces. As a result, business has remained strong for the company throughout the past 12 months – though Kate has noticed a shift in what kinds of

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INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH

“It’s that personal curation – that’s what makes us different”

the current offering. “We’ve changed the colours and we’ve made it more contemporary. We wanted to show that we’ve been contemporary since 1880!” she explains. “We’re always trying to stay ahead of the curve – there is a traditional element, but we’re keeping up with the times and not getting stuck in old-fashioned tastes.” As for the future, plans for a third bricks-and-mortar shop are on hold, with the team focusing on strengthening the online offering. “We’re setting our sights on making sure e-commerce keeps going with the momentum. Everyone is shopping online and we need to keep up. That’s our key ambition at the moment,” says Kate. “But we’re equally keen not to be seen only as an online shop. We want to still be a physical shop, so you still get really good customer service – you can always speak to someone on the telephone, who is working in the shop. It’s still that personal, family business touch.” angelareed.co.uk

products people are investing in. “At the moment, we’re selling a lot of home office stuff, and dining, too, which I thought was curious, considering we can’t actually dine with anyone,” she laughs. “And the other thing that people are still looking for is outdoor living – so firepits are still really popular for us. We thought that was probably just going to be over Christmas, so people could be outside together, but we’re still seeing a big uptake in that. So I think it’s just trying to finds ways to be outside – and make being outside enjoyable! “In terms of inside the home, we’re finding people are looking at how they can add colour with little touches, rather than a full redecoration,” she continues. “So throws, cushions, rugs – things that can update your home and bring a bit of happiness and colour and joy.” Part of the couple’s mission has been to rebrand the shops, though Kate stresses that they’re not reinventing the wheel, but simply updating the branding to reflect

IMAGES Angela Reed’s two stores are treasure troves of handpicked furniture and accessories

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FOOD & DR INK

CHEF’S TABLE L evel up your le f tovers WITH A LITTLE IMAGINATION YOU CAN RUSTLE UP A FANTASTIC FEAST WITH WHAT YOU FIND AT THE BOTTOM OF THE FRIDGE, SAYS ALEX RUSHMER

he bottom of the fridge can either be a gold mine or a terrifying dumping ground. This is particularly true at the moment,

when edible whims are far more difficult to ignore, and the desire for any sort of novelty takes hold with what can often feel like awesome ferocity. With at least two meals a day to prepare, cook and eat, no doubt everyone’s fridge spends most of its time looking like an exhibition of edible curios dating back several weeks. There are certainly a few jars lingering right at the back of my refrigerator that may be of interest to the British Museum. Often a brave attempt at fridge archaeology yields little more than items that are destined solely for the compost pile. Slimy bags of mixed salad, mummified carrots, papery spring onions and sad-looking half bunches of herbs are all regular visitors. I view it as a personal failing when such items end up in the bin. But occasionally there are rough diamonds buried amidst the refuse, secreted in hastily folded foil packages, or hidden inside a repurposed takeaway container. More often than not these are elements that have outlived their original purpose – a couple of cold sausages, half a portion of green vegetables or a tiny bowl of rice – but have the potential to live again given a little imagination and effort. These are skills that we seem to have forgotten over the past few years as food has become cheaper and more plentiful, but are well worth rekindling. A Spanish-style omelette can be an excellent refuge for many small items, as can a batch of fried rice, especially if a jar of kimchi or tub of gochujang is also a regular inhabitant of your fridge. Both of

these are dishes that grace the table with some regularity, particularly if inspiration is in short supply. The revered title of ‘king of the leftovers’, though, will always be reserved for a pie. Even the most mundane selection of ingredients can be elevated to glorious heights simply by hiding them within a pastry overcoat. Part of the majesty of a pie is that it hides its secrets so well: only the pie maker truly knows what to expect when that first, tentative, cut is made through the burnished lid (and even then, it can be a bit of a mystery). I was reminded of this recently when, after a forage well into the depths of the fridge, I discovered a few choice items that individually amounted to very little but had great potential to work as a team. Chief among them were several nuggets

of cheese that had been forgotten after having been attacked late on New Year’s Eve. Each was insufficient by itself to fill a small sandwich, but in combination they certainly had potential. Usually I would be averse to double-carbing, but desperate times call for desperate measures and the current situation certainly qualifies. What’s more is there were also boiled potatoes that needed to be rehomed, so a sleep-inducing, cheesy starch-fest became an inevitability. As a concession to health, I also added a layer of cavolo nero that, having been freshly picked from the garden, didn’t qualify as leftovers but was still an excellent addition. The pastry, I confess, was purchased – I keep three or four sheets of puff pastry in the freezer for precisely this reason – but a homemade shortcrust would have worked just as well had I the patience. The resultant pie was a marvel and fed us handsomely for one dinner (fresh from the oven) and two lunches (straight from the fridge), after lengthy morning walks with the whippet. Sometimes it’s almost

“The revered title of ‘king of the leftovers’ will always be reserved for a pie”

worth deliberately cooking too much, just for the leftovers.

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FOOD & DR INK

MISS EATING OUT? HERE ARE SEVEN MOUTH-WATERING MEAL KITS AND DELICIOUS DELIVERIES TO ENJOY

WORDS BY NICOLA FOLEY

THE ITALIAN JOB Exquisite fresh pasta, sauces and antipasti are on the menu at Levante, a small Cambridge kitchen turning out big flavours. Dishes are inspired by the owner’s homeland on the Italian Riviera, where food is abundant in fresh herbs, produce from the vegetable garden and simple, elegant flavours. The menu changes weekly, but there are some mainstays, such as brisket ragu and vegetable pies in crisp pastry. Recent weekly specials, meanwhile, have included chestnut tagliatelle and lasagne with pesto genovese. Deliveries are made Thursday to Saturday and are free for orders over £15 to postcodes CB1-CB5. levante.shop

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FOOD & DR INK

BUNS OUT Ever get a craving for the intense sugar hit of a Fitzbillies bun? We know we do, which is why we were so delighted to learn of the cafe’s new express delivery option, which can have a box of syrupy swirls on your doorstep in just 35 minutes. The buns are delivered on bicycle by Foodstuff couriers, who can also deliver your Fitzbillies cakes, bread and other treats in the blink of an eye, so long as you’re within a two-mile radius of central Cambridge. Deliveries can be made between 9.30am and 2.30pm, seven days a week. Those further afield can click and collect from the Bridge Street branch or order for postal delivery anywhere in the UK. fitzbillies.com

SUNDAY BEST Brix and Mortar’s Sunday roasts are the stuff of legend, so we couldn’t be happier that the restaurant has launched a takeaway service. The two- course meal contains a choice of meats, roast potatoes, seasonal veg, greens and gravy (plus optional extras like a whole roast cauliflower cheese), and chocolate truffle cake. It costs £12-£25 per person and can be collected on Sundays. exploretock.com/ provenancebrixandmortar FOY STORY Best known for its epic toasties and soups, Quayside’s Café Foy has recently branched out into takeaway meals. Comfort food is the order of the day, with recent offerings including beef bourguignon with baguette dumplings, while the popular tartiflette with charcuterie and pickles is making a reappearance on 6 February, £10-£12.50 per person. cafefoy.com

CHOP CHOP The legendary Cambridge Chop House has struck gold with its meal kits range, from the homemade pie and mash boxes to the sumptuous steak feasts, but our top pick is the roast for two. A perfect Sunday lunch with all the trimmings and none of the faff, it contains duck parcels to start, roasted beef sirloin with potatoes, yorkies and veg, and sticky toffee pudding to finish. Veggie options are available, and each box is priced at £49. cambridgechophouse.co.uk

“A Sunday lunch with all the trimmings and none of the faff”

IF YOU LIKE PINA COLADAS… Pick up your phone and call Mill Road’s 196, which is offering cocktail deliveries Thursday to Saturday across the city. You’ll have your pick of the popular drinking den’s menu, which includes Polynesian rum punches, tobacco old fashioneds, mezcal margaritas and more, delivered in sealed jars on the day of your choosing. Follow @196bar on Instagram for more updates.

CATCH TWENTY-TWO The one we’ve all been waiting for has finally arrived, with Restaurant Twenty-Two revealing delicious details of its new at-home service. The debut menu featured pig’s head croquettes, stout and treacle bread with chicken fat butter, and braised short rib beef with red wine jus – not forgetting desserts and petit fours, making for a truly epic feast to enjoy at home for £45 per person. restaurant22.co.uk

IMAGES Enjoy a brisket, aubergine and lentil ragu from Levante, a takeaway lasagne with garlic bread and green salad from Café Foy or some delicious Sunday roasts from The Cambridge Chop House and Brix and Mortar

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WEDD INGS

YOUR WEDDING MIGHT LOOK A LITTLE DIFFERENT THAN YOU’D PLANNED, BUT THESE FABULOUS LOCAL SUPPLIERS ARE GUARANTEED TO MAKE IT EXTRA SPECIAL

THE GARDEN KITCHEN FEAST IN STYLE

As well as visiting its much-loved cafes on Mill Road and at the Botanic Gardens and Kettle’s Yard, you can now enjoy The Garden Kitchen’s vibrant food on your wedding day. Specialising in beautifully presented, colourful feasts, typical dishes include squash and beetroot salad, freshly baked tarts and homemade dips such as rocket and pumpkin seed pesto. This kind of food is designed for sharing, and ideal if you’re after a laid-back feast served with style. If you’re opting for a more DIY affair, you can collect your order from the shop or, alternatively, the team can deliver and arrange presentation. The Garden Kitchen is also happy to devise a bespoke menu for couples, and can even offer boxed lunches for each guest. Still looking for that perfect Cambridge venue? Garden Kitchen has use of the churchyard next to Kettle’s Yard, which would make a gorgeous spot for a big day gathering. thegardenkitchencambridge.co.uk

ANNA’S FLOWER FARM BLOOMING GORGEOUS

When she’s not tending to her Audley End flower farm or writing columns for this magazine, Anna Taylor creates showstopper bouquets made with homegrown, seasonal blooms. If you want her expert eye taking care of all of your wedding day floral arrangements, check out the Kit & Caboodle package, which includes bride and bridesmaid bouquets, boutonnières, corsages, a bucket of long-stem flowers ready to arrange, and a bucket of short-stem flowers ready to arrange – plus additional arrangements can be ordered in advance. You can be sure of sumptuous, beautiful displays: check out Anna’s Instagram for a look at her work. annasflowerfarm.com

There is no shortage of fantastic local bakeries to turn to for your wedding cake, but we have a particular fondness for Two Little Cats’ immaculately-iced confections. Whether you’re planning a low-key gathering or a big party surrounded by everyone you love (assuming that’s one day possible again), owner Jenni will create you a stunning centrepiece. Specialities include naked cakes, buttercream-blanketed tiers and wedding cupcakes – as well as courses on how to create your own wedding cake if you want to go DIY. twolittlecats.co.uk SUGAR HIGH TWO LITTLE CATS BAKERY

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WEDD INGS

Capturing memories that will be cherished for years to come, wedding photos are an important part of the planning and something you really want to get just right. A concept we love is The Snap Booth, a photo booth company based in Cambridge which offers a collection of open-air booths with a rustic style. Guests will have hours of fun posing and trying out the premium props, top quality lighting and stylish backdrops, and the team will provide the happy couple with a luxury leather-bound guest book for attendees to add their pics and messages. The booths allow you to procure unlimited prints and photo strips, too, so everyone leaves with a visual memento of the day’s highlights. With more people hosting micro weddings, the team is now also offering a more scaled-down, intimate ‘Snap Light’ booth – visit the website for more info. snap-booth.co.uk FRAME YOUR DAY THE SNAP BOOTH

Specialising in unique tents and marquee alternatives, Cambridge Tent Company will help you find the perfect structure for your wedding celebration. Choose between tipis (traditional, Nordic style tents, akin to the Native American tepee), vintage-style sailcloth tents (with wooden central poles, and a parachute-style canopy that is flooded with light from clear sided walls), or stretch tents (a strong, flexible canopy stretched over a number of internal poles to create an eye-catching open structure). Alternatively, the team can help you create a completely bespoke combination of all of the above. The benefit of a tent, of course, is that you can bring the party to wherever you like – be it a gorgeous lakeside setting, family garden, rustic farm or anywhere else that’s special to you and your partner. Prices start at £5,000. cambridgetentcompany.com CAMBRIDGE TENT COMPANY HAPPY CAMPING

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COMMUNI T Y HEROES

Community Heroes THESE CHARITIES AND ORGANISATIONS HAVE MADE A HUGE IMPACT IN OUR COMMUNITY DURING THE PANDEMIC: FIND OUT WHAT THEY’VE BEEN UP TO AND HOW YOU CAN HELP

EAST ANGL IAN AIR AMBUL ANCE

SAVING LIVES & SUPPORTING THE NHS With the NHS under huge pressure, East Anglian Air Ambulance (EAAA) has carried on its vital mission of responding to emergencies and providing critical care 24/7 across the region, as well as supporting hospitals during the pandemic. Inter-hospital critical care transfers, via land ambulance, are needed to help manage capacity in intensive care units as hospitals battle Covid-19, and the EAAA teams are well placed to provide this expertise. In December, EAAA hit the milestone of being tasked 30,000 times since its launch in 2000 – revealing what a crucial service the charity provides for critical care in East Anglia. This year, EAAA hopes to realise its long-term ambition of delivering 24/7 care by helicopter, to help even more people in need. Get involved: Play EAAA’s weekly lottery or join in with this year’s Get Up And Go Yellow fundraiser when the popular challenge returns (date to be confirmed). You can also keep an eye on EAAA’s event calendar: several events which had to be cancelled last year are in the pipeline for 2021, such as Trek 24 – a 24 mile or kilometre walking challenge in September along the North Norfolk coast or around Hexton Manor near Bedfordshire. You can also consider leaving the life-saving charity a gift in your will. These gifts help future generations benefit from EAAA’s care, and you can make use of the charity’s free, online will-writing tool, Bequeathed, at eaaa.org.uk.

FOODCYCLE

TACKLING FOOD WASTE AND FEEDING THE COMMUNITY

With incomes hit hard during the pandemic, the issue of food poverty was thrown into even sharper relief. One organisation doing its level best to feed people in need – while alleviating food waste – is FoodCycle, which creates meals for the community using food that would otherwise end up in the bin. From April to December, the Cambridge FoodCycle team, made up entirely of volunteers, delivered nearly 2000 meals, and saved 9.5 tonnes of food waste. Get involved: Volunteer positions are open for roles including food collection and cooking or hosting at ‘Cook and Collect’ projects, plus Check-in and Chat, a phone service where volunteers call guests for a weekly natter to help combat social isolation. This is a great option for volunteers who would like to give back to the community but are either unable to commit to a set time each week or don’t have a FoodCycle project nearby. Visit foodcycle.org.uk.

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COMMUNI T Y HEROES

ADDENBROOKE ’S CHARI TABLE TRUST (ACT )

HELPING HOSPITAL PATIENTS & STAFF THROUGH TOUGH TIMES It’s no surprise that ACT has been in overdrive in recent times given its work assisting Addenbrookes’ staff and users. During the first wave of the pandemic, ACT launched an emergency appeal that raised more than £1 million in just six weeks: money that allowed the charity to give much-needed support to hospital staff, helping them to deliver the very best care and treatment to patients. This included providing wellbeing spaces for critical care and theatre staff, offering psychological and counselling support for staff, and paying for Christmas hampers for all staff to say a big thank you. Throughout the rest of 2020, ACT also raised £5 million from 37,000 donations – with fundraisers getting creative in lockdown and taking on challenges ranging from head-shaving and fancy dress to a fundraising sea shanty from a Cambridge acapella group. Get Involved: To donate, visit helpyourhospital.co.uk/donate or to fundraise, go to justgiving.com/campaign/helpyourhospital.

THE CROSSROADS

PROVIDING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Watching the gradual decimation of the hospitality sector over the past year is what inspired the team behind CrossROADS to take action, setting up a social enterprise to provide employment opportunities for those who have lost their jobs due to Covid. Located in Oakington, CrossROADS is looking for people to set up and run a business that offers coffee, gelato or handmade chocolates. The successful three applicants will receive rent-free premises, equipment, and advice from business mentors to help get them started. The premises are owned by kitchen cleaning company Bright Hygiene, which is offering the building rent free to give people a life-changing opportunity, as well as creating a welcoming venue for local people to meet and buy coffee, chocolate and ice-cream. Get involved: If you’ve lost your job in hospitality due to Covid and want to apply, or if you’re a business or an individual that can offer equipment, advice or any other support, call Ross on 07778 463597.

WOOD GREEN, THE ANIMALS CHARI T Y

PROVIDING A LIFELINE FOR ANIMALS AND PET OWNERS

A by-product of the pandemic has been an increase in pet ownership, so we’re lucky to have Wood Green, The Animals Charity, to help support pets and their owners every step of the way. Wood Green rehabilitates and rehomes around 3,500 dogs, cats and small animals from its centres in Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire each year. It also helps pets by supporting owners to be the best carers they can be, offering training, workshops and advice, which can be a lifeline for owners and have a huge impact on an animal’s quality of life. So if you’re struggling with a pet- related issue, big or small, contact Wood Green and see what solutions are on offer, and if you’re no longer able to care for a pet, their team can help with that too. Get Involved: Volunteer at a shop, make a donation via the Wood Green website, or help fundraise. The charity also requires foster homes for pets. To find out more, visit woodgreen.org.uk.

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ADVERT I SEMENT F EATURE

Bidwells has been serving Cambridge residents since 1839 and has a long history with the city. But this doesn’t mean it’s stuck in the past – far from it. The company is constantly evolving to become greener and technologically smarter A GREENER, SMARTER PLACE TO FIND YOUR NEXT HOME

Bidwells’ new workspace is fully agile and has a reduced carbon footprint, as employees can work from anywhere, even on the move. You might also spot Bidwells agents cycling around town between viewings on the new electric bikes! Posing a striking image, the building is glass-fronted – glass is one of the most sustainable materials as it’s fully recyclable. It also has wider environmental benefits, such as contributing to mitigating climate change and saving natural resources from being overused. For customers, Bidwells has installed a 4m by 2m LED screen with animated graphics on the front windows, showing the latest properties on the market. If you’re selling your home with Bidwells, the

opportunities for natural daylight in internal spaces. Mechanical and electrical systems are designed to be as efficient as possible, too, with low-energy lighting installations and minimal requirements for mechanical ventilation. The ground floor has a large amount of exposed structural concrete to provide thermal mass and regulate fluctuations in air temperature, reducing potential peaks in the heating and cooling requirement. Gabled in timber, the pitched roof was designed to be both sustainable and sympathetic to neighbouring architecture, including a nearby thatched roof cottage. Roof-integrated photovoltaics generate electricity on-site and provision has been made for electric vehicle charging.

ast year, Bidwells embarked on a project to redevelop a building close to its Cambridge headquarters. The company

wanted to create a modern, sustainable and agile workspace for the residential sales, new homes and lettings teams, while evoking a welcoming, unintimidating, home-from-home feel for customers. Incorporating both passive and active energy-saving measures and technologies, the newly opened residential agency office on Trumpington High Street has been built to exceed regulation standards in terms of sustainability and energy efficiency. The building’s walls and roof are well insulated, with high- performing windows placed to maximise

© LEOHILLIER REGENT

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