Cambridge Edition September - Web

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EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Editorial assistant Frances McNaughton 01223 499469 francesmcnaughton@bright-publishing.com Editorial director Roger Payne Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Sub editors Elisha Young & Felicity Evans ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Lucy McNally 01223 492248 lucymcnally@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Chelsea Fearnley, Charlotte Griffiths, Charlotte Phillips, Alex Rushmer and Anna Taylor DESIGN & PRODUCTION Designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Designer Emily Lancaster emilylancaster@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

omething resembling normality is beginning to return to Cambridge, at least for now. Restaurants have opened their doors, spilling out on to pavements if they can, the river is once again packed with punts – now with added Perspex screens – shops have reopened with one-way systems and hand sanitiser stations, and a general buzz has descended on the city centre, albeit a quieter one than usually fills the streets at this time of year. It’s been lovely to see the local events calendar stirring, with this month bringing art exhibitions, outdoor cinema, comedy shows, classical music in Grantchester’s orchard and even a new theatre opening in the city. Find out more in our ‘what’s on’ section, from page 11. Exciting things are happening on the local food scene, too, with new openings, re-openings (hooray!), delivery services and more in this month’s food pages. Alex Rushmer offers an ode to seasonal fruit in his column (page 38), while the chefs at The Ivy Cambridge Brasserie share some crowd- pleasing recipes on page 40. Our annual September education special is back too, and this time around sees local teachers reflecting on the last few months, as well as offering insight on what schooling might look like in a post-pandemic world. We’ve also got a wish list of goodies from local indies (page 7), home and garden inspiration (from page 69), as

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CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

well as the chance to win a luxurious minibreak on the Norfolk coast (page 27). Enjoy the issue and see you next month! Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Lucy Woolcomb , designer at Bright Publishing

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11 ● WHAT’S ON Feasting at the Fitz, comedy picks and other cultural goings-on in town this month 23 ● BOOK CLUB Helen Callaghan’s Night Falls, Still Missing is this month’s pick; we chat to the author 27 ● COMPETITION Wine, dine and feel the sand beneath your feet on a luxury minibreak to the Norfolk coast! 30 ● FOOD NEWS New openings, re-openings, events and more tasty tidbits from the local food scene

37 ● LIFE ON THE VEG Chelsea gives the lowdown on the plant-based treats she’s discovered this month 38 ● CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer shares what’s been going on in his kitchen, and brain, over the last month 40 ● RECIPES Keep summer going with these tantalising recipes from The Ivy Cambridge Brasserie 49 ● EDUCATION SPECIAL The impact of the pandemic on our school system, plus open day dates for your diary

59 ● BACK TO SCHOOL Get kids kitted out with all the essentials (and some non-essentials) they need for school 62 ● HEALTH & WELLNESS Great bikes for summer cycling and discover Voi, a new e-bike hire service in the city 67 ● RADIO GAGA Julian from Cambridge 105 shares stories from the world of community radio 69 ● HOME EDITION Garden tips, interiors trends and a spotlight on the latest new homes in Cambridgeshire

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CLICK IT LOCAL ONE TO TRY

One of our favourite services to launch out of lockdown, Click It Local brings indie shopping right to your door. A virtual delivery service that covers Cambridgeshire, Ely and the surrounding area, the company’s ethos is to enable small, independent shops to compete with giants like Amazon, and in doing so, help to save the high street. The platform already has over 40 traders, frommuch-loved bakery Grain Culture to Small and Green, a houseplant supplier. The cost of delivery is a flat £3 if you order from one retailer, but you can order frommultiple retailers at once (with each extra retailer adding £1 to the cost). clickitlocal.co.uk

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STARTERS

BOTANIKA SAISON £48 for case of 24, BrewBoard, Harston

VELVET POMPOMCUSHION £19, Angela Reed, Peas Hill

11 INCH BATCHEL IN LEMON CURD £165, Cambridge Satchel Company, St Mary’s Passage

BUMBLE BOX £12.65, Bumble & Oak, via Click It Local

BOUQUETS from £45, Augusta Hope, Fulbourn

GIN COCKTAIL BOX £35, Roundwood Gin, Huntingdon

KENTE FOLDING FANS £22, Ark, Peas Hill

THIS MONTH’S MUST-HAVES FROM LOCAL INDIES

STRAWBERRY DROP EARRINGS

£55, Podarok, Bene’t Street

PERIODIC TABLE PUZZLE IN A TUBE £12, Podarok, Bene’t Street

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ARTS & CULTURE • NIGHT L I F E • ED I T ION BOOK CLUB

IMAGES The iconic Bompas & Parr golden pineapple outside the Fitz. Find out more about the museum’s reopening on page 14

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CAMBRIDGE EDITION EXHIBITION

We’re thrilled that our cover artworks are being used in a mini exhibition at Marleigh, Hill’s new development on Newmarket Road. Depicting rowers on the Cam, the glasshouses at the Botanic Garden, punters, university colleges and other Cambridge landmarks, the illustrations inject a splash of vibrant colour into the sales and marketing suite. You can go and take a look around for yourself, as well as exploring the beginnings of this major new neighbourhood for Cambridge, which will eventually contain some 1,300 new homes, plus community facilities. marleigh-cambridge.co.uk

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COMING UP AT THE ADC

After being forced to bring down the curtains during the coronavirus lockdown, the ADC is readying itself to open once more, presenting an eclectic programme of shows to see us through autumn. From panto to Shakespeare, there’s plenty of fantastic student theatre in store, with the new season featuring a mix of main shows (7.45pm) and late shows (11pm). “We’re very excited about being able to return to in-person events,” enthuses Jamie Rycroft from the ADC team. “There’s a lot of work that we’ve been doing this summer that will allow us to both present our plays to a socially distanced audience, while also livestreaming them to audience members at home. Our management team is a small, close-knit team of six people, and I have been amazed by how quickly everyone has been able to adapt to closing down the theatre, working from home and now preparing to present shows in a way we have never done before.” Even during peak lockdown, the team was hard at work, putting out ADC Online: an impressive digital programme of brand-new theatrical content. “It provided the opportunity for students to produce theatre even when we had to close our building and cancel our whole summer season,” explains Jamie. “I was impressed by the creativity and ambition that the students displayed

in the shows they produced, ranging from radio plays to sketch shows and all manner of other videos, which are still available to watch for free on our YouTube channel. The response from audiences was very positive, and it was lovely to have people nationally and even internationally engaging with shows that they otherwise would not have seen.” New guidelines have necessitated some changes at the venue, which has introduced one-way systems, reduced its audience capacity and requested that all theatregoers wear face coverings while inside the auditorium. Once everyone is comfortably seated, there’s a great line-up of drama, comedy and more to entertain. “I’m especially excited by our upcoming production of Shakespeare’s Macbeth , the excellent Last Summer at Bluefish Cove – which is a landmark play in lesbian theatre; and our fortnightly Footlights Smokers, which provide a great blend of sketch comedy and stand-up.” And of course, the ADC’s autumn season wouldn’t be complete without the traditional CUADC and Footlights pantomime, a very funny and often touching show written from scratch by students each year. This year’s panto will be Sleeping Beauty , and Jamie promises that the creators are currently hard at work integrating some topical content into the show… adctheatre.com

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NOW BOOKING

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JACK DEE 16 DEC, CORN EX, £26 Star of Sorry I Haven’t A Clue and Jack Dee’s Happy Hour , the bad- tempered comic serves up a helping of his trademark sarcasm. PAUL WELLER 5 MARCH, CORN EX, £48 Frontman of The Jam and Style Council, the ‘Mod Father’ is back on the road with hits old and new.

After an extended closure, The FitzwilliamMuseum reopened its doors in August, having implemented various new measures to keep visitors safe. Floor markings have been introduced, face coverings must now be worn inside and while entry will still be free, tickets must now be booked in advance via the museum’s website. Even though things might be a little different, the team are delighted to be back in action, as director Luke Syson explains: “I’ve been enormously grateful for all the support we’ve received at the Fitz during lockdown. We’ve been able to improve what we do online and there’s more to come. But without doubt – we’re excited to get back in the building and to be welcoming visitors again. Looking at art isn’t a luxury, it’s an essential. Art doesn’t really come alive unless we’re there to see it.” fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk THE FITZ IS BACK!

MYSTERY JETS 23 APRIL, JUNCTION, £19.50 Makers of hits including Two Doors Down and The Boy Who Ran Away , indie vets Mystery Jets are still going strong: catch them in April.

BAROQUE CLASSICS AT THE ORCHARD

Professional classical music ensemble Eboracum Baroque is gearing up for a live performance at The Orchard Tea Garden in Grantchester. The group, formed in 2012 by Chris Parsons, has performed at many of the UK’s most prestigious venues, including Senate House in Cambridge. Presenting works from Handel, Purcell and Vivaldi, the ensemble will delight you with their operatic arias, concertos and instrumental suites in the orchard setting, along with refreshments from the tearoom. Eboracum Baroque’s last performance at The Orchard went down a treat, so the next one on Friday 4 September is not to be missed. Head to

BELINDA CARLISLE 27 OCT, CORN EX, FROM £38 The iconic singer

brings her gutsy vocals and power ballads to Cambridge as part of her Decades tour.

their website for tickets. eboracumbaroque.co.uk

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GENOMES AT HOME

Celebrating 20 years since the landmark first draft of the complete human genome, Wellcome Genome Campus is launching a series of free online talks called ‘Genome Lates’. The talks – hosted by established science writers and broadcasters via online streaming platform Zoom – aim to teach people more about the far-reaching impact of the Human Genome Project, presenting personal stories and looking back on the incredible advances that have been made in genomic science over the past two decades. “With genomics and biodata featuring ever more in people’s lives, we’re excited to mark the 20th anniversary of the entire human genome’s first draft with five lively events,” says Ken Skeldon, head of the public engagement team at the Wellcome Genome Campus. “Inspired by the groundbreaking science happening at the Wellcome Genome Campus, we hope the series will provoke discussion and invite people to ask questions and share views, particularly on where genomics science might take us in the future.” Genome Lates will enable people to discuss and explore new discoveries in genomics, as well as the impact that these breakthroughs have had on their lives and wider society. Among them will be institute directors, scientists coming up against Covid-19 and those who worked back in the early days of the Human Genome Project. The next talk, on 28 September, is ‘Big Data in Biology’, which gives viewers a chance to meet the man who organised a bet known as the ‘GeneSweep’ for scientists working on the Human Genome Project (he had over 460 bets by the time the draft of the human genome was published in 2003). On 29 October, hear from Dr Jane Loveland, Dr Kerstin Howe and Dr Simon G Gregory on their contributions to the landmark Human Genome Project, looking at the incredible impact it has had on science, medicine and society, and how we apply this knowledge today. Finally, on 26 November, catch ‘Slowing the Spread’, a very topical look at how genomics can help us understand Covid-19 – and the challenges of doing groundbreaking science in times of social distancing. For timings and more details, visit the website. publicengagement.wellcomegenomecampus.org

COMEDY PICKS

We could all use a good laugh after the last few months and luckily for us, there are some fantastic comedians heading to Cambridge to help us on our way. Custard Comedy is hosting an evening of alfresco entertainment at Quy Mill’s Big Garden Bar on 12 September, with TV comedians Paul Sinha and Laura Lexx performing from 5pm until 8pm. Over at the Cambridge Corn Exchange meanwhile, you can hear from Jon Richardson, who brings his whip-smart new show to the venue for a two-night run on 25 and 26 September. Finally, lovers of numbers and weird facts should check out Matt Parker, who brings his Humble Pi show to the Junction on the 30th. A look at the greatest mathematical near-misses and mishaps involving planes and bridges, you’re guaranteed to hear some wild stories and be impressed by Parker’s knack of making maths hilarious.

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At a time when arts venues are facing extinction across the country, Cambridge is bucking the trend with a brand-new venue set to open this month. Located in Market Passage (at the site that once housed the Cambridge Arts Cinema and, more recently, B Bar), Town and Gown Pub & Theatre is set to bring edgy, exciting, ‘Fringe-style’ theatre to Cambridge, offering in-house productions and professional touring shows. The building has undergone a dramatic design overhaul, now sporting an attractive deep blue and gold facade, while inside, you’ll find the main mezzanine dining area, with its private booths and baby grand piano. There’s also an elegant balcony area for a more intimate dining experience, allowing you to drink in the theatre’s atmosphere while overlooking the venue. The crowning glory is the theatre itself. Designed to work for a diverse range of performance styles and layouts, it will play host to the very best musical theatre, professional touring fringe artists, cabaret and home- produced productions in the coming months. This year, theatres were among those hit with the news that they must close indefinitely, leaving workers both on and off the stage unsure when – or even whether – they would have a job to come back to. Many found themselves unable to apply for financial support packages, and some went from juggling several jobs to not being able to find work at all. Larger theatres, some of which reel in millions of pounds a year, have been able to garner government support, but many smaller, independent theatres have been left in the lurch. “It’s really important that we get the arts scene moving again soon, especially with panto season coming up,” says Karl Steele from the Town & Gown team. “The arts sector has been battered a bit, so we’d like to emerge as a support system to assist over the next few months. We’re lucky to be able to say that we’re opening a theatre rather than closing one!” The Town and Gown Pub & Theatre is set to open by the end of September, and the programme – which covers all performances across the rest of 2020 – is available online. Head to cambsedition.co.uk to read more about the theatre’s upcoming plans. townandgown.co.uk TAKE YOUR SEATS !

BECKIE REED AT BYARD ART Cambridgeshire-based artist Beckie Reed is unveiling her long-awaited solo show at Byard Art this month. Running from 10 September to 4 October, the exhibition showcases Beckie’s expressive and evocative treescapes, inspired by her meandering woodland wanders. The paintings have an alluring quality that draws the viewer in, offering a sense of ethereal escapism that captures the wildness and transience of the natural world. Beckie’s work is now exhibited and collected worldwide, and is sought after in creative capitals like New York, and as far afield as Hong Kong. Find out more about the exhibition on Byard Art’s website. byardart.co.uk

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SOME ENCHANTED EVENING…

Enchanted Cinema continues its season of open-air film screenings this September, bringing both classics and recent hits to the gorgeous garden at the Gonville Hotel. Cosy up on a deckchair, popcorn and prosecco in hand, and enjoy The Greatest Showman on the 5th, Fight Club on the 6th and Hook on the 10th. The weekend after, it’s over to Rami Malek, who steals the show in the Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody (11th), followed by Dirty Dancing (12th) and Rocketman (13th). Rounding off the month in style will be a dazzling trio of Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet , Titanic and quadruple Oscar winner Parasite . As always, you can expect live music, fairy lights galore and a fully stocked bar – just remember to wrap up warm. cambridgelive.org.uk

IN THE FENS EXHIBITION

Contemporary textile art group Anglia Textile Works is about to embark on its second exhibition in Ely. The group was established over 20 years ago, bringing together talented artists who specialise in various forms of creative expression, including fine art, design and quilting. Each artist has their own distinctive style; their works often dipping into diverse themes and displaying a fondness for experimentation. In the Fens , which is due to arrive at the Babylon Gallery on 10 September, brings together new works by the artists, with many of the pieces drawing inspiration from the unique qualities of the Fenland landscape. You can catch the exhibition up until 27 September, and the gallery is open Tuesday to Sunday, 12pm to 4pm. babylonarts.org.uk

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City Art Books

he City Art Books series, which launched with the inaugural Cambridge Art Book , has become a hugely popular celebration of

50 local artists in a huge range of media and styles.

ARE THERE ANY HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE CAMBRIDGE ART BOOK THAT YOU’D LIKE TO SHARE? The highlights from The Cambridge Art Book and the City Art book series as a whole are similar. It is an honour to see such great works of contemporary art in the cities and to then work with the artists to put the books together. So far I have worked with over 300 artists and have made some lovely artist friends along the way. Another highlight is when all of the celebrity endorsements come in for each of the books, from Stephen Fry to Sir Paul McCartney, who wrote the introductory note for The Liverpool Art Book . It is always a thrill to see what those from the cities think of the art and the books. WHAT CAN WE EXPECT FROM THE DUBLIN ART BOOK? The Dublin Art Book will continue the City Art Book narrative of showing the city of Dublin through an amazing variety of vibrant contemporary art and styles from over 50 local artists. The maps in the book encourage locals and visitors to walk around Dublin, see the sights and stand for a while in the footsteps of an artist.

much-loved cities in the UK and Ireland. With a mission to show each city through the eyes of its artists, the series brings together professional painters, seasoned sketchers and amateur artists – all of whom have been inspired to create art by the city they call home. With The Dublin Art Book coming out this month, we speak to City Art Books creator and editor Emma Bennett to find out more. WHAT ORIGINALLY INSPIRED YOU TO START CITY ART BOOKS? I was visiting the bookshop at the Tate Modern in Liverpool in 2016, and the display of books about art got me thinking how great it would be to show my (adopted) home city of Cambridge through the eyes of the artists it inspires. I am a visual artist and much of my work shows Cambridge and Ely. There wasn’t anything like it, so I thought: how hard could it be to put a book together? It was challenging – and a leap of faith from independent Cambridge publisher UIT and the artists involved – but in 2017 The Cambridge Art Book was published, showing the city through the eyes of over

The Art Books are local interest, art and a guidebook – what more could you need?

DO YOU HAVE PLANS TO CURATE CITY ART BOOKS FOR ANY MORE CITIES IN THE UK? Our first combined city book is just in production – The Bristol and Bath Art Book – which will be a great contrast of the two different cities. Then I would like to explore Manchester and its art, and then hopefully Birmingham, my city of birth, to celebrate the Commonwealth Games. The list is endless though, and I get contacted by artists from all over asking if I am going to come to their city! Due to be released on 3 September, The Dublin Art Book will be available to purchase for £14.99 from the book’s website, thedublinartbook.co.uk

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CAMBRIDGE EDI T ION

BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS NIGHT FALLS, STILL MISSING

CAMBRIDGE-BASED WRITER HELEN CALLAGHAN DELIVERS ANOTHER RIVETING THRILLER THAT COVERS COMPLEX FEMALE FRIENDSHIPS, TWISTING PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND THOUSANDS OF YEARS OF HISTORY IN A TENSE AND GRIPPING TALE. AS THE ARCHAEOLOGY IS SLOWLY UNEARTHED, SO TOO ARE THE SECRETS...

readers pondering the question: just how far would you go for your very best friend? Published at the end of July, Night Falls is Helen Callaghan’s fourth book. “It feels really strange to have a book come out in lockdown, because normally I’d be going round bookshops, signing stock, talking to people and so on – but because you can’t do that, it all feels strangely unfinished,” she says. “I made the switch to online events and am working with local libraries – which is all very nice, but normally

Madison isn’t there to meet her – and her dig colleagues didn’t realise she was missing. As Fiona starts investigating her friend’s disappearance, everything starts to unravel – and soon it’s Fiona who’s in danger herself. Night Falls, Still Missing is undeniably a thriller – and an extremely gripping one at that – but it’s also a cleverly observed book about female friendship, and the often complex and shifting nature of relationships between women, leaving

riends Madison and Fiona have known each other since childhood: studying together, sharing their lives and staying deeply connected in spite of the fact that the two women seem to have grown apart. Both work in archaeology – so when Madison sends a text begging for help from her current dig on a small windswept island in Orkney, Fiona drops everything and rushes up the country to be with her old friend. Yet upon Fiona’s arrival,

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you get to meet people in person. It’s a bit weird: but I’m getting used to it.” Helen spent her lockdown at home in Cambridge: based in Girton, she’s spent the time working on her fourth book, escaping our city back at the start of July to visit Cornwall on a quick research trip. “That was really good – but strange as well,” she says. “You’ll go, and visit all the places, do all your research things – but at the same time, it’s like a sensory overload: it’s much more than you’re expecting. You get tired really quickly, which was very strange for me: normally I’m very energetic on these sort of trips, but I kept wanting to head home and have a nap!” she laughs. The action of Night Falls takes place on a set of islands in Orkney, and researching the book was a real joy for Helen, who is extremely fond of the archipelago. “I’ve done writing retreats there, and it’s a wonderful place for a retreat. You have set, very short daylight hours, so I would go out and buy food – and then you have those long nights to write in,” she says. “I’d thought for a while that it’d be a great place to set a book, but I didn’t have a story. I did have this other idea that I was working up, and then one day I realised that if I changed that idea, I could set it on Orkney and make the landscape work – and that was it, I didn’t stop after that.” Helen spoke to the country archaeologist and various residents of Orkney during her proper research phase, but it took a couple of years before she actually sat down to write the book, and though the friendship storyline wasn’t in the original concept, the idea started to form as the book took shape. “I found that really satisfying to write, almost more satisfying than the plot – not quite as satisfying as the setting – but a lot of work went into constructing their friendship. You read all these books and you have female friendships where they’re like sisters, they love one another – but then you also have books where they’re toxic, non-friendships – and maybe it’s giving a little too much away, but none of my friendships are like either of those!” Helen laughs. “They’re complicated relationships. None of them are based

on real people, but when you write, you put together composites of moments that you’ve had in your life, and you compose characters out of that.” Another thought-provoking subplot of Night Falls concerns the changing nature of long-term relationships, both friendships and family, and how resisting change and insisting or assuming that people stay in their defined roles can be disastrous for everyone concerned. “When you grow up with someone, they know the you that you were when you were a child,” Helen says. “That happens to Fiona several times in the book: she’s displaced into this person that she used to be, and tries to resist that. And also from the point of view of it being a thriller, you are then left in a

IMAGES Night Falls, Still Missing is a psychological thriller and the fourth novel from Cambridge author Helen Callaghan (pictured right)

LOOK OUT FOR THE CAMBRIDGE EDITION BOOK CLUB STICKERS IN HEFFERS AND GET MONEY OFF OUR MONTHLY PICK Heffers is located at 20 Trinity Street, Cambridge blackwells.co.uk

“When you write, you put together composites of moments that you’ve had in your life”

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“Having the plan means you’re never lost”

HELEN’S CAMBRIDGE I spent a lot of time on the Backs, where I jogged and exercised, which was really beautiful and good for my mental health – for someone who has a very sedentary job, I need the outdoors a lot. I really miss the Cambridge University Library: it’s a lovely place to work, and I don’t know when it’ll be opening again. Most of my second book was written there. It’s entirely possible to sit there all day and not see anyone, and have a beautiful view over to Clare College.

I also love the Panton Arms on Panton Street – that’s a great little pub.

people are very interested in processing the event while it’s happening, but then no-one wants to relive it.” Though she won’t be writing the first coronavirus thriller, Helen can definitely see a number of potential plots. “You’re not meant to visit your holiday home, but my book’s set in Cornwall, so of course there are holiday homes – if people visit them and bad things happen, what can they do? Can they tell anybody? What do serial killers do during lockdown? What about lovers? I went jogging on the Backs during lockdown, and the amount of people I saw who were nominally dressed in running gear, talking to their lovers on their phones...” she laughs. “But no judgement!” Although writing about a place and community that suddenly wasn’t accessible to research definitely has its challenges, Helen’s confident she’ll find a way through. “It’s hard as a writer, because it feels disingenuous,” she says. “But I’m confident we’ll return to that world – hopefully by the time the next book comes out.”

place where she doesn’t know who she is, and you don’t know who she is – it raises the tension a bit.” Helen approached the task of writing differently for all of her books. “The last book, Everything Is Lies , had a totally nailed-down plotline that I started out with. Nearly all of that ended up being thrown away, but it’s still worth the exercise of having it, because when you actually write, you get better ideas, and having the plan means that you’re never lost. It’s like that Eisenhower quote: ‘Plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.’ With this book I had a plan until about halfway through, but I didn’t know what was going to happen – so I knew I needed to write it to find out. Several of the main characters didn’t actually appear until quite late on: three, four weeks away from handing it in.” The writer always defaults back to notebooks and notecards, and laying her plots out physically on a table to work out where the story might be headed. “I’m a sucker for a whizzy app, but ultimately,

especially when in that very early stage, having those physical objects is so helpful. Praxis – there’s a word!” she laughs. “There’s something about laptops: the words come out, it all looks so even – so there’s also something about just taking a notebook and writing: you know it’s not going to ruin the book, and it takes the pressure off a bit.” Helen’s next book, which she’s been working on during lockdown, is set in Cornwall, in a community living in a touristy fishing village – which caused the writer a little concern when the world shifted on its axis at the start of this year. “I started to wonder if I was on the wrong track, if I was describing a world that certainly doesn’t exist at the moment – and it’s not clear when it might come back. I took the views of my agent and my editor, and interestingly they said that this will pass, and that when it does, people won’t want to read about it. They’ll want to forget it ever happened! Apparently – and Penguin had records on this – this was the case after the Spanish flu epidemic as well:

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COMPET I T ION

WIN A STAY AT THE GROVE, CROMER!

restaurant on your minibreak, too, enjoying some of its celebrated fine dining fare before hitting the hay. Come morning, you’ll be treated to a delicious breakfast made using local produce before you set off home, refreshed and revitalised. Sound good? Head to the Cambridge Edition website at cambsedition.co.uk and hit the Competition tab to find out how to win! The Grove, 95 Overstrand Road, Cromer, Norfolk, NR27 0DJ thegrovecromer.co.uk/01263 512412

f a trip to the coast for some salty sea air, fabulous food and your own luxurious suite sounds like exactly the right tonic for these stressful times, we’ve got the perfect giveaway for you. We’ve teamed up with The Grove hotel in Cromer to give away an indulgent overnight stay in the new Number 11 suite, complete with hearty breakfast, worth £160. A Georgian house set in four acres of glorious Norfolk countryside, The Grove has it all, from the award-winning

restaurant to the heated indoor pool to the beautiful gardens and glamping field – it’s even got a direct woodland path to Cromer’s beaches and cliffs. Our lucky winners will be able to explore the glorious north Norfolk coast or nearby town of Cromer before bedding down for the night in their suite, which is luxuriously furnished and has views across the west lawn and copper beach trees. You might want to take advantage of the hotel’s double AA Rosette-winning

T&Cs: Prize excludes Saturday nights and school holiday periods. Prize must be claimed within 12 months. Value of prize is approximate as total value depends on time of year. No cash alternative available. Competition closes on 30 September

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ADVERT I SEMENT F EATURE

WELLCOME GENOME CAMPUS OPEN SATURDAYS GO VIRTUAL! Every third Saturday of the month, from September to November, explore the hidden world of genomics

reviously, on the third Saturday of each month, the Wellcome Genome Campus would open to the public, allowing people

to tour the scenic campus, discover the science that takes place there, and explore an exhibition. With the campus closing to visitors in March, Open Saturdays were put on pause. Since then, the campus has been busy finding new ways to engage with the public and can now reveal that September sees a return of these monthly events – with a twist! Between September and November, the Open Saturday experience is going online. Each month, Wellcome Genome Campus will bring you a variety of activities, topical conversations, virtual tours of the campus and much more, all brought to you from the comfort of your own home. Join a virtual tour, guiding you through the 125-acre site, from the beautiful 18th-century Hinxton Hall to

the cutting-edge sequencing laboratories, and finishing at the wilds of the wetlands nature reserve. This month’s Open Saturday theme is set around the current pandemic and how the campus technicians have been using computer coding to find solutions to questions like: who was patient zero? How can we trace the virus around the country? How can you get scientists to stop leaving the fridge doors open? We need your help to solve the mystery. Also, there will be plenty of opportunities for face-to-face virtual discussions with the researchers and technicians who will be keen to talk with you and answer any questions about their work and the world of coding at the Wellcome Genome Campus. The first online Open Saturday is on 19 September. You can attend everything, or just drop into an activity that piques your interest! Visit publicengagement. wellcomegenomecampus.org for a full schedule. The events are free to attend, but you do need to register at bit.ly/oscoding

Open Saturday: Coding Discover the world of coding, and find out how it can be utilised to help with pandemics and everyday life. 2-5pm, Saturday 19 September

Open Saturday: Bioarchaeology Discover ancient DNA at the bioarchaeology-themed event, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology East. 2-4pm, Saturday 21 November

Open Saturday: Human Genome Project Anniversary On its 20th anniversary, come and find out why the Human Genome Project was so vital. 2-4pm, Saturday 17 October

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C A M B S E D I T I O N . C O . U K

RECI PES • NEW OPENINGS • CHE F ’ S TAB L E • L I F E ON THE VEG

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FOOD & DR INK

A MONTHLY ROUND-UP OF GASTRO GOINGS-ON AROUND CAMBRIDGESHIRE

FARMDROP LAUNCHES IN CAMBRIDGE

Tired of Tesco? Online food delivery service Farmdrop brings sustainable, ethically sourced produce from local and independent growers and producers direct to your doorstep. Rather than importing foods from across the globe, Farmdrop prioritises local businesses, continuously striving to bring you the freshest seasonal ingredients that are as good for the environment as they are for your health. The company also ensures that the highest animal welfare standards and lowest carbon emission levels are maintained across its services, meaning that – by using Farmdrop - you can shop safe in the knowledge that you’re doing your bit to make a difference. Head to Farmdrop’s website to sign up. farmdrop.com

Artisan ice lollies, anyone? Mobile ice lolly venture Cambridge Craft Lollies has been a hit in the city this summer and, lucky for us, it’s still warm enough to enjoy one (or five…). The flavours include hibiscus pomegranate, watermelon mint and – wait for it – roasted peach and jalapeno. The lollies are all made with entirely natural ingredients and are packed with fruit, with just a smidgen of cane sugar and complementary herbs and spices added to enhance the fruity flavours. Look out for the distinctive red cooler-fronted trike around the city centre, and be sure to flag it down and treat yourself! CAMBRIDGE CRAFT LOLLIES

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FOOD & DR INK

BURWELL BREWERY Tucked away in a quiet corner of the Fens, Burwell Brewery is a collaborative effort from brewing enthusiasts Ricky Dolphin and Paul Belton. Run from a purpose-built timber building in Ricky’s back garden, the brewery produces a range of high-quality craft ales, including golden pale ale ‘Burwell Sunshine’ and ‘Beer Fuggled’, described as ‘a true session beer’. The brewery has been supplying beer festivals, clubs and events in the local area since it was founded in 2019, making a name for itself in Burwell and beyond. All of the beer varieties can be ordered via the Burwell Brewery website. burwellbrewery.com

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Mill Road hang-out Scott’s All Day has recently launched a bottomless brunch offering, luring in diners with promises of bloody marys, mimosas and decadent brekkie dishes. Available on Saturdays and Sundays from 10am to 2pm, the brunch is priced at £30 per head, which gets you free-flowing refills of fizz, beer or cocktails, plus one from a choice of brunch dishes that includes pancakes with crispy bacon and maple syrup, a brunch pizza (featuring Mill Road Butcher’s Sausage, portobello mushrooms, fried egg and mozzarella), veggie fry up, or ‘The Stonker’: the cafe’s whopping full English. Scott’s recently expanded onto the pavement outside, too, so you can enjoy your boozy morning feast with added people watching on Mill Road. Bottoms up! scottsallday.com BOTTOMLESS BRUNCH AT SCOTT ’S

EVOLVE COFFEE SHOP AND BAR

passion, outstanding customer service through an amazing team and fantastic value for money,” says Ryan. “Thankfully, the feedback we have received in person and online clearly shows that people seem to love the decor, our friendly team and, of course, our quality coffee and cakes, which we are so proud of!” The family plan to turn the venue into a social hub for hosting events in future, with live music, comedy nights and community fundraisers all potentially on the horizon. You can find Evolve Coffee Shop and Bar at Cambridge Innovation Park in Waterbeach, with more information and contact details available on the venue’s website. evolvecoffeebar.co.uk

After the pandemic caused their new shop’s opening to be pushed back by several months, the Taylor family are proud to finally present their latest venture. Modern coffee shop by day, laid-back bar by night, Evolve is a local independent business run by brothers Ryan and Lloyd Taylor, along with their father, Mark. If it’s a beverage you’re after, Evolve offers high-quality barista coffees and hot drinks, a range of soft drinks, plus all of your favourite tipples on tap. There’s also a sandwich and cake selection that’ll have you spoilt for choice – all served in a relaxed, family-friendly environment. “Our ethos when it comes to running the business is very simple: to offer incredible

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HILL ST IS BACK

All of you chocolate fiends can breathe a sigh of relief: Hill St is back. The artisan chocolatier has been tickling Cambridge’s taste buds since it opened in December last year, introducing the city to new levels of chocolatey luxury with its exquisitely handcrafted confections. The business has been closed during lockdown, and it’s safe to say that we’ve felt its absence deeply (those of you who managed to get your hands on the endlessly impressive Easter offerings may be most able to relate). Hill St is open for business once again from 1 September, so get yourself down to All Saints Passage if you’re in need of a serious chocolate fix. You can also order online via the Hill St website. hill.st

VEGAN VICE AT THE SNUG

In case you haven’t heard, festival food favourite Vegan Vice is in town. Hosted at East Road venue The Snug ( just around the corner from The Grafton), Vegan Vice’s meat- free meals have been driving the city wild; its flavoursome soy-based

burgers and crispy ‘chick’n’ sides causing even the most seasoned of meat-lovers to question their life choices. It also makes a mean milkshake, with the vanilla caramel and salted pretzel flavour in particular elevating vegan ice cream

to dizzyingly dreamy new heights. The Snug is open Wednesday to Sunday from 12pm, but if that doesn’t work for you, Vegan Vice is now also available for delivery. Head to the website for more details. veganvice.club

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EXQUISITE CAKES, HANDMADE CONFECTIONERY AND ARTISAN GELATO ARE IN STORE AT THE OPENING OF THREE NEW SHOPS Sweet spots

TOM’S CAKES With hugely successful shops in both

Cambridge and St Ives, Tom’s Cakes is preparing to add a third site to its cafe empire. Situated on Ely High Street – just a stone’s throw from Ely Cathedral – the new shop is set to solidify Tom’s Cakes’ reputation for devastatingly good handmade baked goods. tomscakes.co.uk

DULCEDO Soon there’ll hardly be a corner of Cambridge that isn’t home to some serious patisserie prowess, and we have Dulcedo to thank for that. Due to open at the end of September, the new shop on Mill Road hopes to follow on from the success of the much-loved original shop on Hills Road and the second shop in Eddington. facebook.com/dulcedopatisserie

IWM COOKING TUTORIALS Imperial War Museums has teamed up with award-winning baker and food writer Dan Lepard to offer a series of cook-along video tutorials. The videos, which can be accessed via the IWM’s social media channels, feature exclusive insight from historians and real-life experiences of those who lived through the second world war, celebrating the ingenuity and community spirit that brought people together in times of hardship. “Recent months have seen many of us turn to cooking, baking and getting creative in the kitchen for some much-needed comfort and entertainment,” says Dan. “IWM’s extensive archives contain a stack of fantastic and easy recipes, as well as first-hand accounts of the challenges – from vegetable growing to rationing – that wartime cooking presented. Drawing inspiration from these, I am excited to have teamed up with the museum to release a series of short videos that celebrate simple ingredients, delivering unexpected flavour and a side of history.” The cook-along video tutorials will offer modern twists on classic recipes from the 1940s, including hearty homemade puddings, curry dishes and rationing classics like potato-wrapped sardines. All of the recipes have been inspired by IWM’s book, Victory in the Kitchen: Wartime Recipes , which can be purchased on the IWM website. iwm.org.uk

JACK’S GELATO Nigh-on household name Jack’s Gelato has taken the city and the country by storm with its delicious ice cream offerings, and now it has a second home to call its own. The new shop on All Saints Passage is a quieter spot to relax and enjoy some famous flavours, including the new soft serve ice cream and shop-specific specials. jacksgelato.com

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The b ig scoop L I FE ON THE VEG CHELSEA FEARNLEY TOURS CAMBRIDGE IN SEARCH OF THE BEST ICED TREATS THE CITY HAS TO OFFER FOR SWEET-TOOTHED VEGANS

have been told that Parma Violets are Britain’s most loathed sweet. Unforgivingly referred to as smelling of “old lady” by my nearest and dearest, just the thought of these little purple drops evokes in him a strong physical response that makes him scrunch up his face and want to gag. I have to hand it to him for his theatrics, but I can’t

help but feel saddened by this. For me, Parma Violets are full of nostalgia and bring back wonderful memories of my childhood. Every Thursday after school, my brother and I would rush out of the building towards the gates where our dad would be waiting for us. He waited for us every day, but Thursdays were special because on those days he would take us to the sweet shop on our walk home and I always picked the Parma Violets. So, when I heard that Jack’s Gelato was serving this up as a flavour, I had to have a scoop, or three. The Parma Violets ice cream had a twist of blueberry, which was a sharp and refreshing match for the sweet violet. A true display of craft and inventiveness, where each lick transported me back to that precious memory. My boyfriend, who is also vegan, opted for the less daring dark chocolate and sea salt flavour. The chocolate was intensely rich and bittersweet; the sea salt subtle. I personally would have liked more salt, but I do have a slight obsession with it – the sort of obsession where I will buy a pack

of pretzels just to pick the salt shards off. In terms of texture, the ice cream was luscious and creamy, and hard to believe that it was made without dairy. There are always vegan options at Jack’s Gelato, with several sorbet offerings, too. But the menu does change often, so it’s not guaranteed you’ll get to try these ones when you visit. However, one thing that can be guaranteed is that you will get to try ice cream concoctions that are out of this world. Its flavour archive includes pine nut, candied orange and olive oil; black sesame; and matcha, as well as a boozy Eagle Rare 10-year-old bourbon. Purists like my dad, who rarely deviate from the classic vanilla, should try the gelato at Aromi – instantly you know

it’s going to be good because the cafe’s owners hail from the birthplace of gelato. I had the best gelato of my life in Rome: it was a salty sweet, deliciously creamy pistachio number made with olive oil instead of dairy. I still think about it to this day, so the thought of being able to have gelato made by Italians who reside in Cambridge feels like a dream come true. Aromi’s current vegan options are limone de Sicilia and fragola (that’s Sicilian lemon and strawberry to me and you), which is made using lemons that are shipped in from an organic farm in Syracuse, Sicily; their juices adding a zip that electrifies the delicate gelato. It’s a truly remarkable experience, since most citrus flavours these days are given to ice cream’s inferior cousin, sorbet. Despite lemon-flavoured desserts being a favourite of mine, the fragola bowled me over. Each batch that Aromi’s gelatiere prepares is made using 20 kilos of locally sourced strawberries and you can tell; you can literally see, smell and taste the fruit. It was a refreshing, yet deliciously satisfying gelato, which may even top the one I had in Rome...

“The Parma Violets ice cream is a true display of craft”

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CHE F ’ S TAB L E

A p lum job CHEF’S TABLE SOFT, SWEET FRUIT IS ONE OF THE JOYS OF AN ENGLISH SUMMER. CHEF ALEX RUSHMER SHARES HIS FAVOURITE WAYS TO PREPARE THEM

erhaps it was the warm sun of early lockdown spring, or the surprising rains of July that swelled the fruits on straining

branches into remarkable sweetness, but this has been an incredible year for plums and their assorted brethren. A dozen years ago we planted a small stick in our back garden – a house-warming gift from a colleague, presented to us in a sorry plastic carrier bag – and until this year it had been largely forgotten. It was biding its time... Now three metres tall, the branches are aching under the weight of greengages, clustered like grapes hidden amongst the leaves. We lost a few to moths, a tell-tale brown dimple on the outside of the fruit signifying that it is likely home to a tiny, wriggling larva, but even so there is a sizeable glut. They are delicious whilst still firm, the flesh yielding only slightly and a gentle acidity running through them, but they are even better when the skin begins to blush red and the fruit is warm, candy-sweet and almost luminous in colour. Close by, a friend has several plum trees as part of an orchard, at least four different varieties ranging from dark skinned, damson-like fruits to yellow- fleshed, lurid pink victorias. “Please come and pick some – we can’t turn them all into chutney,” came the plea. And so, we did, collecting six or seven kilos of the ripest, freshest, sun-dappled fruit I could imagine. Days later the boot of our car was still brightly, sweetly perfumed from where we had stacked the crates to transport them to the restaurant. It is easy to be complacent with produce that nudges perfection. But often

couple of weeks work experience at a restaurant in Dorset. I rustled one up and it went straight on the menu that evening. Rather stupidly I then forgot to write the recipe down and never managed to scale the dizzy heights of that perfect clafoutis. A few years later I put out a request on Twitter asking if anyone could send me the recipe, but received no response until several months later when the telephone rang at the pub I ran at the time. A kind soul had been informed of my request and recited the recipe over the phone to me and, to this day, I haven’t tweaked it a single gram. It is the same recipe that we’ve been making at the restaurant as part of our Vanderlyle To Go menu the last couple of weeks. A few varieties of locally grown, hand-picked plums, baked into submission in a delicate batter that speaks of lightness, hiding discreetly the quantities of egg yolk, cream and ground almonds inside it. For me, it is the perfect dessert and one that is ideal as summer fades away into the subtle cool of autumn. And just in case you’re wondering, the generous voice on the end of the phone, who talked me through the recipe so patiently? None other than David Everitt- Matthias himself.

complacency prevents complication and the fruit was so good we wanted merely to allow it to bask in its own brilliant glow: unfussed, unsullied and untarnished – maybe a couple of supporting actors allowing it to shine. Stewing fruit is one way to amplify the flavours but maybe a little further down the line. Now, whilst there is more balance in the fruit, baking is a far better option, and clafoutis has long been my favourite method of showcasing stone fruits at this time of year. Traditionally made with cherries, this Limousin staple – essentially a thick, sweetened batter baked with fruit – is similar to a tart but without the faff of having to make pastry. I first came across it flicking through a cookbook by David Everitt-Matthias, chef/owner at Cheltenham’s much-garlanded Le Champignon Sauvage, whilst gaining a

“Varieties of hand-picked plums, baked into submission”

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