Cambridge Edition March 2020

YOU R MON T H L Y F I X OF LOCA L L I F E

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FROM RESTAURANT WEEK 2020 TO CAMBRIDGE SCIENCE FESTIVAL, GET THE LOWDOWN ON THE CITY’S TOP EVENTS THIS SEASON

EDITORIAL Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Editorial assistant Frances McNaughton 01223 499469 francesmcnaughton@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editor Felicity Evans Junior sub editor Elisha Young ADVERTISING Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Ad sales manager Ed Grundy 01223 499463 edgrundy@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Lucy McNally 01223 492248 lucymcnally@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Phoebe Fielder 01223 499454 phoebefielder@bright-publishing.com CONTRIBUTORS Angelina Villa-Clarke, Jordan Worland DESIGN & PRODUCTION Designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck Sue Bailey, Ruthie Collins, Daisy Dickinson, Chelsea Fearnley, Siobhan Godwood, Charlotte Griffiths, Alex Rushmer, Christina Smith, Anna Taylor,

s celebrated on our front cover, March has rolled around again, bringing its annual moment in the spotlight for our boys and girls in light blue who’ll be taking to the Thames to battle it out with rowers from ‘the other place’ on 29 March. After a clean sweep from Cambridge in 2019, when it triumphed in both the women’s and men’s

races (featuring a celebrity guest cameo fromOlympian James Cracknell), we’re betting Oxford will be suitably fired up this year – making for an extra fun watch for us! Turn to page 8 for tips on where to catch the action and more. Also in March, if slightly less famously, is Pie Week, which runs from the 2nd to the 8th and is the topic of our Cambridge on a Plate article this month. I’m not sure how I feel about the historic Cambridge delicacy of ‘rook pie’, but the Parker’s Tavern chicken tikka masala pie sounds absolutely delicious – find out more on page 62. For something a little healthier, chef Alex shares the recipe for his restaurant’s salad: a many-layered thing of beauty which has been known to contain more than 40 ingredients (page 60), plus we visit Hildersham to review Pear & Olive, a village pub that’s been transformed for a new era (page 70). Also in our food and drink pages this month, we meet Greg and Chris Smith, the sibling duo behind Hill St, Cambridge’s newest, and definitely swishest, chocolate shop. Selling exquisite, handcrafted confections from their pastel-pink boutique on All Saints’ Passage, the brothers have already been creating quite a buzz – turn to page 53 to read their story so far. Elsewhere this month, the city flexes its intimidatingly large brains at the Cambridge Science Festival (page 30), Thriplow lays on vintage village fete fun with its annual daffodil festival (page 23), plus there’s a chance to see the newspapers brought to life at Sunday Papers Live (page 33). Don’t miss this month’s Edition Book Club either, where we’ve got an interview with crime fiction doyenne and Cambridge resident, Sophie Hannah. Read all about

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CAMBRIDGE EDITIONMAGAZINE Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

her latest, brilliantly creepy, novel and find out where in the city she loves to hang out over on page 27. Enjoy the issue and see you next month! Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

This month’s cover illustration was created by Laura Bryant , senior designer at Bright Publishing

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8 ● STARTERS Unmissable events, plus our favourite social media snaps of the city 13 ● ARTS & CULTURE The best theatre performances, art exhibitions and more in Cambridge this month 23 ● MELLOW YELLOW Thriplow’s annual Daffodil Weekend charity fundraiser returns this March 25 ● ART INSIDER Ruthie Collins, founder of Cambridge Art Salon, shares her arty picks of the month 27 ● BOOK CLUB Sophie Hannah’s latest thriller Haven’t They Grown is this month’s featured read 30 ● SCIENCE FESTIVAL Cambridge Science Festival is back this month, promising plenty of fun for families 33 ● SUNDAY PAPERS LIVE The popular festival-inspired event comes to Cambridge this month 35 ● AFTER HOURS The best comedy, gigs and more nightlife fun this month 41 ● LISTINGS

48 ● FOOD NEWS The latest gastro happenings, featuring food festivals, new openings and more 53 ● HILL ST INTERVIEW We meet the talented brothers behind Cambridge’s newest chocolatier 59 ● CHEF’S TABLE Chef Alex Rushmer on his Feast & Fast menu collaboration with The FitzwilliamMuseum 60 ● RECIPE Alex shows you how to create Vanderlyle’s sensational staple salad 62 ● CAMBS ON A PLATE To celebrate British Pie Week, Dr Sue Bailey investigates our obsession with pies 64 ● RESTAURANT WEEK Get ready for a second helping of delicious dining discounts 70 ● RESTAURANT REVIEW We headed to Hildersham’s Pear & Olive to sample its seasonal menu

72 ● INDIE OF THE MONTH Cycling shop and cafe hybrid Bicicletta on becoming a centre for the community 75 ● MUM’S THE WORD Treat your mum this Mother’s Day at one of our top five local event picks 76 ● COMMUNITY HUB Community news, events and more from your local hub 79 ● WEDDINGS Part two of our guide to gorgeous Cambridge wedding celebrations 89 ● BEAUTY & WELLNESS Beauty products you need on your radar, plus a look around Cambridge’s new luxury spa 95 ● EDUCATION Assistant headteacher Christina Smith shines a spotlight on success and happiness 97 ● HOME EDITION Tips and inspiration for your home and garden this month

Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this month

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STARTERS

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The gorgeous Ivy Cambridge Brasserie has launched a selection of new dishes inspired by the changing season. Asparagus gets celebrated in a dish that puts the spears of spring front and centre, drizzled with truffle hollandaise, as well as in a chicken Milanese with shaved asparagus and radishes. Diners can also put some zing into their spring with a fresh and fruity watermelon salad served with quinoa and sweet potato. Dishes from £7.95. theivycambridgebrasserie.com SPRING DELIGHTS AT THE IVY LOOK OUT FOR

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STARTERS

After many months of crack-of-dawn training sessions on the Cam, the time has come for the university’s rowing teams to don their Cambridge blue wellies and head to the Thames for the annual Boat Race. Contested over 4.25 miles of lively river between Putney and Chiswick Bridges, the race has taken place for 185 years, with Cambridge leading the current scores on the board in both the men’s and the women’s head-to-head records, by 84 races to 80 and 44 to 30 respectively. If you don’t fancy braving the crowds lining the Thames, you can be certain that plenty of Cambridge pubs will be screening the action on 29 March. The Fort St George, a regular haunt for the city’s rowers, is showing all the race day coverage and always draws an enthusiastic crowd, or The Cambridge Brew House is screening the race and offering themed menu specials (plus a takeaway brekkie in a box, if you can’t drag yourself away from the TV). theboatrace.org BOAT RACE 2020

May Week (actually in June) is the time of year when students let loose at lavish events before parting ways for the summer, and it’s one of the great Cambridge University traditions. The fireworks displays, costing the colleges tens of thousands of pounds, are always a breathtaking spectacle, and even if your student days are long gone, you can join the fun. Rutherford’s is already taking bookings for its May Week experience, offering punting on the nights of the Trinity ball (15 June) and St John’s (16 June), the two colleges known for having the most spectacular displays. Pack up a picnic, some prosecco and enjoy the fun. rutherfordspunting.com A WILD NIGHT ON THE RIVER NOW BOOKING

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EXHI B I T IONS • CONCERTS• THEATRE • BOOK CLUB

IMAGE Glorification de l’Élue , 2011, artwork at the Linderism exhibition at Kettle’s Yard until 26 April

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ARTS & CULTURE

Brought to life by professional artists from the UK, Denmark, Germany, Austria, Norway, Spain and Poland, I Will Be Everything is an international project that tells the story of the future in 50 years’ time – through the eyes of children. Working locally in schools and communities across Europe, the project makes young people the storytellers of their local communities, allowing them to imagine the future of their neighbourhood and their city. Stories created by the children are performed in this public exhibition, that features live music, projections, shadow puppetry and animation. Tickets for the show, which will be running on 11 and 12 March with multiple performances each day, are available to purchase from Cambridge Junction’s website. junction.co.uk NEW INTERNATIONAL ENCOUNTER: I WILL BE EVERYTHING

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ARTS & CULTURE

NAOMI HARWIN AT THE WYSING ARTS CENTRE

Showing at Wysing Arts Centre this month is a new exhibition by Naomi Harwin. Encounter is the first in a series of presentations by Wysing artists as part of Test Space, which allows artists to experiment with new ideas and directions on a public platform. Harwin has been a studio artist at Wysing Arts Centre since 2015, and her interest in the interplay between line and form produces works that shift between two and three dimensions. Employing techniques of drawing, photography, print and sculpture, Harwin explores the dialogue between forms and their represented images, presenting a series of ambiguously sourced objects that reference machine-made and corporeal forms. Encounter is showing at Wysing Arts Centre from 2 March until 3 May. wysingartscentre.org

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LINDERISM

A new solo exhibition by art’s ultimate punk, Linder, is on show at Kettle’s Yard this month. In association with Newcastle’s Hatton Gallery, it spans the artist’s five-decade long career and presents new commissioned pieces. Linderism is taking over the entirety of the gallery space, the Kettle’s Yard House, the Research Space, staircases, cafe and even neighbouring St Peter’s Church, charting Linder’s diverse career and practice through examples of her early work in the seventies up to her more recent interventionist public commissions. Famed for her feminist photomontages and role in the punk and post-punk movements, Linder’s work is often radical and divisive. Her photomontages frequently marry household objects and pornographic images, juxtaposing wildly different registers to create works that disrupt the glossy perfection of print culture. Questioning the mechanics of gender is a cornerstone of Linder’s work, illuminating our social expectations of sexuality and identity over the decades and exploring their links to consumer culture and the media. The exhibition’s title, Linderism , as well as alluding to Linder’s own interest in style in both an artistic and fashionable sense, also hints at the artist’s work being a movement in itself. She has frequently been referred to as one of the most relevant artists of our times, with many of her works – from the cover art for the Buzzcocks’ Orgasm Addict , to her large-scale commissioned street-level billboard Bower of Bliss for Art on the Underground at London’s Southwark station – becoming highly recognisable due to their bold and confrontational style. This multisensory exhibition utilises all aspects of Kettle’s Yard; Linderism bleeds into the cafe menu, staff uniforms and even invokes the elusive presence of Helen, the wife of Kettle’s Yard founder Jim Ede, through an innovative sound installation in Helen’s bedroom. Helen’s presence – or lack thereof – in the house has proved to be a key source of inspiration for Linder. Her interest in the idea of ‘the invisible woman’ and the gender-entrenched power dynamics involved has fuelled much of her work. She has created a new photomontage for the exhibition using archival photographs of Helen, in addition to a line of products called the House of Helen, including fabric squares, printed papers, cosmetic mirrors, pin badges, notebooks and scented candles. These will all be available at Kettle’s Yard, celebrating the artist’s commitment to uncovering women lost to history. As part of the exhibition, Linder is staging a performance at Murray Edwards College on 14 March, which is a new iteration of her Bower of Bliss performances and features a soundtrack by her son, musician Maxwell Sterling. Her choice of venue is home to the largest collection of art by women in Europe – the New Hall Art Collection – which is likely no coincidence, given Linder’s important role in the progression of feminism over the past fifty years. Linder’s work as a performance artist, zine-maker, musician, documentary photographer, collaborator, muse, guru, medium and bodybuilder is all explored in the exhibition, which is running throughout March. You can catch Linderism at Kettle’s Yard until 26 April. kettlesyard.co.uk

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ALBION QUARTET

Kettle’s Yard plays host to celebrated string ensemble the Albion Quartet on 5 March, promising an evening of exquisite classical music. Featuring pieces by Beethoven, Maconchy and Brahms, the concert will give ample opportunity for the talented foursome to show their exceptional musicianship. Formed in 2016, the Albion Quartet comprises four of the UK’s most outstanding young string players, with the quartet currently holding residencies at the Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama and London’s Kings Palace. They are also members of the Cavatina Chamber Music Trust, and give regular chamber music workshops at primary schools. Having collaborated with several composers and renowned artists, the Albion Quartet are quickly establishing themselves on the world stage, as their frequent appearances at prestigious venues across Europe are proving. Their Kettle’s Yard concert starts at 8pm on 5 March. Tickets are £20 and

Enjoy a booze-fuelled history lesson at Cambridge Junction on 27 March, when the Thinking Drinkers return with a brand-new show and plenty of free drinks. This time around, the tipsy twosome is taking a look at history’s greatest drinkers, discovering how alcohol has inspired explorers, politicians and painters in equal measure. As well as hearing about the drinking exploits of Plato, Picasso, Nelson and Napoleon, audience members are treated to no fewer than five free drinks. You’ll learn, you’ll laugh, and you’ll likely get pretty tiddly too, all for just £18. junction.co.uk THINKING DRINKERS

are available from kettlesyard.co.uk

CAMBRIDGE FOOTLIGHTS

World-renowned comedy troupe Cambridge Footlights is back in the city this month with two shows filled with sketches and stand-up. Taking place at Cambridge Arts Theatre on 8 and 15 March, the performances will showcase the best and most hilarious new comedy from some of the country’s finest student comedians. Founded in the 1880s, Footlights gave a springboard to some of the UK’s comedy greats, including John Cleese and Olivia Colman, with the current crop recently touring the UK, performing for thousands of people across two continents. Tickets start at £13. cambridgeartstheatre.com

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Cambridge University’s Botanic Garden has just released its exciting programme of events for 2020, and there’s plenty to look forward to over the next couple of months. For those of you who are new to the garden, there will be regular tours on offer with one of the garden’s expert guides. The tours are available on the first Sunday of the month at 2pm in March and April, and every Saturday and Sunday at 2.30pm throughout the summer months. During the school holidays, you can meet the garden’s vegetable growing experts and learn more about how to cultivate your own vegetable garden. Catch them from 2pm until 3.30pm every Tuesday afternoon. Launching on 15 March, Science on Sundays is a programme of informal, monthly drop-in plant science talks, which feature some of the latest university plant science research. They will run twice a day – at 11am and 2pm – on the third Sunday of each month until 16 August. You can also catch the garden’s new Spotlight on Science WHAT’S ON AT THE BOTANIC GARDEN

sessions on the same days, where science students from the university will be on hand to explain more about the scientific side of the Botanic Garden. On Sunday 15 and Sunday 22 March, science pop-up Trees Under Threat is running from 10am to 3pm. Visitors will be able to interact with researchers and take part in a tree ID trail around the Botanic Garden, discovering which species are threatened and learning about what they can do to help. The Easter holidays have several events on offer, with the garden bursting into colourful bloom. Follow the Easter trail around the garden – from 28 March to 19 April – and find a tasty treat waiting for you at the end. On Friday 24 April there is a series of workshops as part of Cambridge Conservation Initiative’s Earth Optimism event, where you can pick up some hints and tips on how to record wildlife in your own garden. All of the events are included in the general admission price. botanic.cam.ac.uk

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AN INSPECTOR CALLS J B Priestley’s classic thriller An Inspector Calls is perhaps more relevant than ever, if its enduring popularity is anything to go by. Stephen Daldry’s production for the National Theatre has just completed a sell-out London season and American tour – picking up a string of awards along the way – and is set to return to theatres this spring. An otherwise peaceful dinner party is turned upside down when Inspector Goole arrives to investigate the death of a young woman. His troubling revelations pick the prosperous Birling family apart, causing all of us to question our consciences. Seen by more than five million people worldwide, this visionary production presents a radical and challenging interpretation of the play. You can catch An Inspector Calls at the Cambridge Arts Theatre from 17 to 21 March, with tickets from £20. cambridgeartstheatre.com

THE RISING FESTIVAL

To celebrate International Women’s Day, The Rising Festival offers opportunities for women to network and develop professionally. Providing inspiration, motivation and encouragement for personal growth, the festival enables women to connect and build on their skills both personally and professionally. Based on 2019’s extremely successful event, this year’s festival will feature over 30 speakers sharing their tips for success, along with personal stories and their thoughts on the biggest issues facing women today. The day will be filled with interactive workshops and open conversations, celebrating the achievements of women from a variety of different backgrounds. Some of the highlights include talks about gender equality, the struggles of staying motivated and how to become a better leader. The festival champions investing in yourself and will leave you feeling inspired to achieve your full potential in your own life and career. If you’re looking for a fresh perspective on how to flourish despite the pressures and demands of modern life, The Rising Festival is your chance to gain support and insight for a future marked by meaningful change. The festival’s flagship event will be on 14 March from 9am to 5.30pm – tickets via eventbrite.co.uk

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THE GREAT ESCAPE

Escape rooms have become a big trend in the last few years, but what makes the one at Oliver Cromwell’s house different is the historic location, which is reflected in the setting of the game. Designed around the heritage of the building and the connection with Oliver Cromwell, the game takes place in the house’s tithe office, a 17th-century wood-panelled room where Cromwell himself would have counted taxes. Step into the room and back to 1910; the current resident of the vicarage

has rented the tithe room to his friend Cornelius Chadwick, who has now disappeared. Your task is to piece together the clues left around the room and find out where he has gone, and why. Siobhan Godwood from the Edition team took a group of 14 year olds along to discover if they were up to the task. “The puzzle was challenging,” she says, “which made it satisfying when we deciphered clues, and definitely suitable for a team of adults. Our teenage detectives were a bit disorganised, but

our guide was on hand, behind closed doors, to offer gentle clues and we got there in the end. The house makes a very atmospheric setting for an escape room game, and we completed our visit with a tour of the rest of Cromwell’s house and learned a lot about its history.” You can book an escape room at Oliver Cromwell’s house for one of three sessions every Saturday and Sunday, with extra slots on bank holidays and on Thursdays during school holidays. olivercromwellshouse.co.uk

The Academy of Ancient Music is back in Cambridge this March to bring you a performance of Baroque composer Handel’s best-loved operas and oratorios. Handel’s Heroines is a collaboration between the Academy and the London Handel Festival, promising to bring you a thrilling concert. The show includes a dazzling programme of Handel’s work, featuring Serse , Ariodante , Rinaldo and Semele , along with plenty of other fine arias and duets with acclaimed Handelian Laurence Cummings, who brings his unmistakable flair to the show both on harpsichord and as director. The stunning sopranos of Mary Bevan and Jennifer France are thoroughly celebrated throughout the show, which any fan of Handel’s melodies would be a fool to miss. You can catch Handel’s Heroines on Thursday 12 March at 7.30pm at West Road Concert Hall. Tickets from £16. cambridgelive.org.uk AAM CONCERT – HANDEL’S HEROINES

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THR I P LOW DAF FOD I L WEEKEND

Mellow Yello w BLANKETING THE VILLAGE OF THRIPLOW IN YELLOW BLOOMS EACH YEAR, THE ANNUAL DAFFODIL FESTIVAL RETURNS THIS MARCH

WORDS BY FRANCES MCNAUGHTON

ince 1969, the Thriplow Daffodil Weekend has been one of Cambridgeshire’s best-loved charity fundraising events. It

began as an effort by Thriplow residents to raise money for the church’s much-needed roof repairs – by making cups of tea for visitors to their gardens, no less – but its incredible success made the Thriplow Daffodil Weekend an annual event. Some of the villagers still open their gardens for visitors of the event to this day. Run entirely by volunteers, the event attracts more than 10,000 visitors each year. The festival offers over 100 stalls throughout the village, selling everything from clothes to coffee. Virtually everyone in the village and its surrounding area volunteers to help organise the weekend, with preparations beginning months in advance. The Thriplow community comes together to produce a thoroughly impressive event that has raised more than £450,000 for charity over the past 50 years. Their work was recognised in 2011 when the festival committee received The Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service, which is akin to an MBE for charities. Thriplow Daffodil Weekend of course gets its name from the flowers that constellate the village in springtime. There are more than 100 different varieties of daffodil on show during the weekend, with the people of the village planting more each year. They make sure to plant early and late varieties, so no matter what the weather, visitors are guaranteed to be greeted by a village dotted with daffodils. Newly planted for 2020 is the Thriplow Gold, which is a variety of narcissus that has been specially dedicated to the village. Visitors are free to wander the car- free village over the two days, drinking in everything the traditional country fair has to offer. Whether you’re browsing the stunning daffodil displays, enjoying a cup of tea and some homemade cake in one of the tea rooms, or riding on a vintage

This year’s Thriplow Daffodil Festival takes place on 28 and 29 March from 10am to 5pm. Tickets are £8, with discounted tickets for children and families. Book online before 22 March to get 10% off at thriplowdaffodils.org.uk

to experience a typical English village fete – but this one is on steroids! During the weekend, the villagers will serve more than 6000 cups of tea and 3000 slices of cake – not a bad effort for a village with only 400 residents! With live music being played all around the village, it’s the perfect place to get some springtime cheer. And there are daffodils too; we now have over a million planted in and around the village. We are always guaranteed to have flowers in bloom as we have over 117 different varieties, including our very own daffodil named after the village. Thriplow Daffodil Weekend is England at its eccentric, welcoming best!”

tractor, the festival is fun for all the family. This year, you can find street food and beer at Taste of Thriplow, watch demos by the blacksmiths in the smithy, see the classic cars on show at Vintage Thriplow, and enjoy the morris dancing on the village green and the Civil War re-enactors marching through the village. There is also live music, painting exhibitions, poetry recitals and magic shows. Chairman of Thriplow Daffodil Weekend Paul Earnshaw says: “We are looking forward to welcoming visitors

IMAGES There’s something for all the family, including tractor rides, live music and a classic car show

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RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH

the traditional fen hayrick, making it a space in which you can read, write or contemplate nature. Artist Ivan Morison says a key reference for the artists is the song Mother , from Idles’ debut 2017 album Brutalism, because it’s “a song that expresses an anger and frustration at the modern world, and its impact on our individual and family lives”. He adds: “The sculpture offers a space to reflect on these troubling thoughts, as well as an opportunity to perhaps still the mind for a while by focusing on the simple material qualities of the work, and the changing nature of the landscape that surrounds it.” One very positive response to climate emergency has been this huge resurgence of interest in reconnecting with the natural world – from the ‘rewilding’ movement to practical ways to grow or source locally grown food, this timely reaction against the Anthropocene flourishes in the arts, too – long may this last. You can also hear talks on women in science and conservation at the Museum of Zoology as part of International Women’s Day on 7 March at 2pm. Go to hear more about the “amazing women working to understand and protect the world around us”. Nature lovers can also go sculpture hunting in the city’s many gardens and parks: from finding a Barbara Hepworth sculpture over on the grounds of Churchill College, to taking in Jesus College’s enchanting garden, with excellent sculpture on display (and a fantastic cafe), there’s plenty to discover. There will be a programme of events celebrating Mother... over the coming months. With

t’s March: spring is most definitely here. Time to dust off the chillier months and get cracking with new cultural ideas and inspiration. Cambridge has long been known for its spires and willow-trimmed facade, but it also has a strong urban side to it, too. A side whose vernacular character is being increasingly

The Flying Pig, famously, was apparently where Pink Floyd’s Syd Barrett first met David Gilmour; a bastion of the kind of old-school pubs that underpin British culture. A hub of close-knit community spirit and intimate gigs, it pulses with the kind of creative character that many feel is under threat in the city. “All cities change, but there’s a danger that the vernacular buildings that give character to a place, for ordinary people, are being lost. Respecting people that live in an area, that make a community happen, their views should be taken into account,” says Butler. People wanting to help the pub can sign the petition on change.org. “Get in touch with your councillors,” urges Butler. “They are elected by us to listen to us. Go down to The Pig and enjoy it, as it might not be there in five years. That sense of celebrating what’s there is key.” Also one to visit this month is Mother... , the newly launched public art commission by Studio Morison (made up of artists Heather Peak and Ivan Morison) at Wicken Fen. The stunning natural landscape and wide, East Anglian skies make this an evocative spot to encounter art, nominated by the public for the commission as part of New Geographies. Commissioned by Wysing Art Centre, the work is a response to nature writer Richard Mabey’s book Nature Cure , a memoir recounting his recovery from depression through connecting to nature. Also inspired by artist Heather Peak’s childhood memories of the East Anglian landscape, its sculptural shape references

commercialised, putting at risk some of the city’s most vibrant cultural hotspots. Perhaps one of the most symbolic of these developments is the battle to save The Flying Pig on Hills Road. Artist Jim Butler is exhibiting a range of illustrations of this well-loved pub, commissioned by The Guardian , in The Pig itself until 6 April. An Illustration and Book Art lecturer at the Cambridge School of Art, Butler’s work explores the urban experience. “Places like The Pig are the heart of the community,” says Butler. “I’ve been in Cambridge 13 years and I still remember the first time I went there. The first person behind the bar I spoke to was print maker Kip Gresham’s son, who grew to become a successful artist in his own right – Mr Penfold. The place has always been a way in to meeting people, giving a real sense of cultural life of the city.” He adds: “The whole atmosphere, people mixing, those things are so important. If you lose it, it’s not easily replaced. It has a unique atmosphere and the landlords are brilliant.”

Mother’s Day this month, might this be the perfect place to take your mum for a nature-inspired treat? Whatever you do, have a fabulous March, all.

“Time to get cracking with new cultural ideas and inspiration”

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BOOK CLUB

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BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

CRIME FICTION QUEEN AND CAMBRIDGE DWELLER SOPHIE HANNAH DISCUSSES HER LATEST THRILLER, WHICH UNSETTLES FROM ITS IMPOSSIBLE PREMISE TO ITS CHILLING CONCLUSION HAVEN’T THEY GROWN BY SOPHIE HANNAH

her young family, leading the reader down intricately plotted twists and turns towards a gripping finale that’s both simultaneously totally unexpected and horrifyingly apparent – the mark of an absolutely first- rate thriller. “It was really good fun to write, partly because I just loved the idea,” Sophie says. “As soon as I thought of the children who haven’t grown, I just thought – wow, that is such a good hook, and I was really excited about writing it.” The idea first came about exactly as the book itself opens: Sophie was taking her son to an away football match, and realised

after a falling-out. But Flora seems to be accompanied by her two children, Thomas and Emily – who, bewilderingly, appear to still be the ages they were when the friends last spoke. It’s an immediately disturbing concept: to get a sense of the book’s menace, just try saying the title out loud a few times, changing the intonation from the one that you’d comfortably fall into when in conversation with parents about their offspring: it quickly becomes darker, more sinister. Why haven’t they grown? Attempting to answer this question consumes Beth, her husband Dom and

aybe he’s a monster already. It’s so easy to believe that the label only fits infamous historical

figures and mug-shot faces we see on the news. When it’s someone in our personal life… it’s hard to believe that their true nature might be monstrous.” Haven’t They Grown is the latest thriller from prolific Cambridge-based author Sophie Hannah. The new book hinges on a deliciously simple yet also complex mystery: central character Beth spots her old friend Flora, who she hasn’t seen for 12 years

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BOOK CLUB

“I do like to do things differently each time”

the game was located very near to the new house of a friend who she hadn’t seen for about ten years. “We hadn’t fallen out at all, we just hadn’t seen each other – so I thought I’d go and have a look at their new home – I’m obsessed with houses,” Sophie says. “While I was there I thought that they might come home, and I might catch a glimpse of them – and I realised that as I was imagining that possibility, I was thinking about the children as they had been when I’d last seen them. I realised that they wouldn’t look like that anymore and then thought – but what if they did? That would be sinister… and it all went from there.” This all took place several years before Sophie sat down to begin writing Haven’t They Grown – as with all her books, Sophie works with ideas that first occurred to her three or four years earlier. “That’s not to say it’ll always be the case: I do like to do things differently each time, perhaps using a totally different method – but in the past, the idea has normally been knocking around in my brain for a while before I write it.” As you’d expect with a mystery, this book is concerned with hidden truths – but Haven’t They Grown takes it one step further by prodding our very human reluctance to disbelieve those we love or know well, as the extract at the start of this piece alludes – we’d almost prefer to believe supernatural explanations than suspect our friends of misdemeanours, which would upset the social norms that keep civilised society ticking along. “This isn’t a spoiler of any kind, but both Beth and Dom are good guys, and the point at which Dom says to Beth: ‘Maybe let’s withdraw from this, and not get involved any more’ – that’s not because he doesn’t believe her, it’s because he does believe her,” Sophie explains. “When he realises things are plainly more dysfunctional than he wants to encounter, then he says to Beth, ‘You’re right, something weird is going on – but let’s have nothing to do with it. If we forget about the Braids, we could just get on with our life, which is absolutely fine.’ Dom thinks Beth has a duty to protect her kids; whereas Beth

thinks she has a moral duty to find out what’s wrong.” Every book that Sophie writes has a plot hook that she can get excited about – in this case, Flora’s children and the question of why they hadn’t grown – and a meatier thematic or psychological obsession that drives the heart of each book. “The obsession in this book is: when is it morally right, and when is it morally wrong, to interfere in another family’s business?” Sophie says. “Minding our own business is an important part of civilised British life – we don’t go round to our friends’ houses and say, ‘Now look: you’re bringing up your children terribly badly’ – even if we do think that. But there are occasions where you notice something that’s so dysfunctional that you think, ‘Actually, it would be wrong now not to stick my oar in’ and that’s the dilemma, that’s what Beth and Dom ultimately disagree about. Is this a case where there’s a duty to intervene, or is it not?” Sophie creates detailed plots for her books, preferring to know exactly where the book’s going before starting out. “I do

LOOK OUT FOR THE CAMBRIDGE

EDITION BOOK CLUB STICKERS IN HEFFERS AND GET MONEY OFF OUR MONTHLY PICK HEFFERS IS LOCATED AT 20 TRINITY STREET, CAMBRIDGE, BLACKWELLS.CO.UK

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CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL

If you’re a fan of gripping thrillers and intricately plotted crime fiction, don’t miss License to Thrill on 17 April at this year’s Spring Cambridge Literary Festival. Sophie Hannah is joining Christobel Kent and Gytha Lodge on stage at St John’s College, when the trio will introduce their latest novels and share the secrets of writing suspense and intrigue. Elsewhere on the line-up, catch Marian Keyes, Caroline Lucas, Hadley Freeman, Jacqueline Wilson and lots more. Booking now open. cambridgeliteraryfestival.com

“I feel much happier writing a book if I’ve got a solid plan”

IMAGE Sophie Hannah, author of Haven’t They Grown, moved to Cambridge in 2010 after falling in love with the city during her fellowship at Trinity College

had no practical reason for living here,” she explains. “I had a fellowship at Trinity College from 1997 to 1999, which was just heaven. Working there was probably my single most life-changing experience – they were so welcoming, they gave me everything they possibly could and created this amazing environment for me to do my writing – I will always adore Trinity College. We fell in love with Cambridge then, and always thought we’d want to move back – but were finally able to in 2010.” Aside from Trinity, there are plenty of places that Sophie adores. When she nears the end of a book, she retreats to Lucy Cavendish College and the Anna Bidder Room that overlooks the college’s extensive gardens. “It’s a more modern college than Trinity, but so beautiful,” Sophie says. “Lucy Cavendish offered me a fellowship, so I go and work there – once I get to a stage of a book where I can’t cope with the normal distractions of being at home, I’ll hide myself away at Lucy Cavendish. But I also love the Botanic Gardens, and St Botolph’s Church, it’s such a beautiful building... I love Parker’s Piece – I just love Cambridge.”

to a scheduling challenge, Sophie found herself having to deliver the fourth Poirot novel at the same time as the residential course was taking place. “Every night when I went back to my room, I was writing thousands of words of Poirot denouements: I decided to think of this as a good thing, because the students were then able to see all that happen – every morning they’d ask ‘How many words did you write? Are you going to make the deadline?’ – and although I was exhausted by the end of the week, I did manage to get the book in, and it added a certain je ne sais quoi, a little excitement and adrenalin to the first teaching module. Though I wouldn’t want to do it every time...” she laughs. With her next Poirot project moving into editing mode, and her next thriller not due to begin writing until May or June, Sophie has a little time to enjoy the city she calls home – and it’s definitely an understatement to say that she loves Cambridge. “We’re just coming up to our ten-year anniversary of living here. The only reason we moved here was because it was our favourite place in the world, we

sometimes have ideas for changes to my plan, and if I prefer the new ideas then I’ll change things, but I’m definitely a planner – I feel much happier writing a book if I’ve got a solid plan,” she says. “I don’t know how people do it [without a plan] and so many crime writers do: they just have an idea for chapter one, and take it from there – and that would fill me with so much anxiety...” It’s fair to say that Sophie is a busy person: as well as her much-loved thriller series, she’s also behind the new Poirot novels, with the next due to arrive on shelves in the summer, and has written extensive collections of poetry as well as two non-fiction books, the latest of which will be published in May. Sophie is also running a coaching programme for writers called Dream Author, and is leading a brand new Master of Studies (MSt) course in Crime and Thriller Writing at Cambridge’s Institute of Continuing Education, where the writers will be guided through the process of creating a crime or thriller novel from initial beginnings to dramatic conclusions. The first cohort had their first residential module in January this year: due

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CAMBR I DGE SCI ENCE F EST I VAL

HERE COMES THE SCIENCE! FRANCES MCNAUGHTON REVEALS WHAT YOU AND THE WHOLE FAMILY CAN LOOK FORWARD TO DURING CAMBRIDGE SCIENCE FESTIVAL

for families. Dr Peter Wothers, from the University of Cambridge’s Department of Chemistry, is back with another of his much-loved action-packed talks, this time charting the elements involved in mankind’s mission to light his way. There are also hands-on demonstrations with Microsoft HoloLens, talks about the fastest animals on Earth and a virtual reality cycle ride. In the second week you can catch a talk called CRISPR technology and the future of genome editing on 16 March, led by CRISPRCas9’s co-discoverer Professor Jennifer Doudna from the University of California, Berkeley. She discusses the implications of this groundbreaking gene- editing tool and the policies around its

rom the 9 to 22 March, the Cambridge Science Festival is hosting nearly 400 events at venues across the city. Now in its

26th year, the festival’s 2020 programme explores the theme of vision, touching on topics from artificial intelligence to the climate crisis, with films, fun science quiz events, comedy and theatre. As always, there are a wide variety of talks and debates on offer, presented by some of the world’s greatest scientists. They will examine our past and suggest a vision for the future, revealing how science can help us understand and solve the greatest challenges of our time. Some of the festival’s distinguished speakers include Professor Dame Athene Donald, former chief medical officer Professor Dame Sally Davies, BBC presenter Dr Adam Rutherford, Baroness Bryony Worthington and neuroscientist Professor Barbara Sahakian. Highlights from the first week include ExoMars Rover : engineering for the red planet on 9 March, in which Abbie Hutty – the Rover’s platform delivery manager – discusses the aims and objectives of Europe’s first Rover mission to Mars. There’s also From policing to fashion: how the use of artificial intelligence is shaping our work on 10 March. Hear about the social and psychological implications of artificial intelligence, from predictive policing to its role in reshaping the fashion design process. On 12 March, you can learn all about organoids in Mini-organs in a dish: how organoids are revolutionising research , which explains how miniature organs are grown and discusses why this new technology is so important for biomedical research. The first weekend of the festival features an impressive array of events

IMAGES The wide variety of talks, demos and exhibitions look at how AI is shaping the world, the future of genome editing and much more

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CAMBR I DGE SCI ENCE F EST I VAL

Cambridge Science Festival runs from 9 to 22 March, with bookings now open. The full festival programme is available to download on the festival’s website, sciencefestival.cam.ac.uk

use in genomics research, or you can learn about the limits to human endurance in The sub 2-hour marathon: What does the future hold? This debate features Dr Dan Gordon, Dr Justin Roberts, Dr Ash Willmott and Dr Francesca Cavallerio of Anglia Ruskin University tackling the physiological, nutritional, technological and psychological components involved in this extraordinary achievement, debating where exactly the limits to human endurance may lie. The second weekend is again aimed at families, with the British Antarctic Survey, the Institute of Astronomy, Wellcome Genome Campus, Cavendish Laboratory and a slew of other museums and university departments opening their doors to the public. Immerse yourself in virtual reality, discover what it takes to be a polar explorer, or find out why robots aren’t taking over the world. There is also a Family Gaming Night at the Centre for Computing History on 20 and 21 March, featuring retro classics like Pac-Man and Space Invaders as well as modern games. On top of the extensive line-up of talks and debates, there are exhibitions,

“With this year’s programme, we hope to inspire and excite”

Dr Lucinda Spokes, Cambridge Science Festival manager, says: “The programme this year is focused on ‘vision’: where we were, where we are and where we hope to be. Science offers huge possibilities to change the course of our planet for the better. With this year’s programme, we hope to inspire and excite our visitors about these possibilities. As ever, we have endeavoured to tackle some of our greatest challenges through a range of events including talks, debates, performances, comedy, film, tours and exhibitions. We look forward to welcoming and actively engaging with our audiences in March, hearing their views and thoughts about current and future scientific research.”

performances and tours across the city that you can get involved in. Artist Joaquín Fargas has created an engrossing exhibition called The Biosphere Project which sheds light on the issues surrounding the preservation of our planet, and there’s an interactive art installation exploring the Climate Bee- Mergency. On 9 March at Thirsty, see comedy Our Disgusting Planet , starring Belle Taylor and Char Mykura in a frank and filthy performance that normalises the revolting. And you won’t want to miss the Botanic Garden’s Plants Inspiring Technological Innovation trail, which will walk you through the plants that are already solving some of the problems we face today.

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SUNDAY PAPERS L I VE

FRANCES MCNAUGHTON GETS THE LOWDOWN ON THE TALKS, WALKS, PERFORMANCES AND FOOD ON OFFER AT THIS SOCIAL SUNDAY EVENT B est

unday Papers Live is returning to Cambridge Union on 15 March, offering a leisurely celebration of Sunday’s best bits. Organised by

local party hosts My Little Festival, the event aims to bring the atmosphere of a festival discussion tent to the city, serving up a host of talks, performances and entertainment – as well as plenty of food and drink throughout the day. Among the line-up of this year’s Sunday Papers Live is columnist Steve Cross, the comedian and compère responsible for hosting SPL’s sister event in London. Statistician and risk expert David Spiegelhalter presents Nasty Numbers in the News, showing you how to dissect the statistics we get bombarded with in the news on a daily basis. Heidi Allen, former MP for South Cambridgeshire, talks to Steve Cross about food banks, post-Brexit Britain, party politics and more, while Kajal Odedra, executive director of Change.org UK and author of Do Something: Activism for Everyone , gives a talk on how we can all be activists, as she believes that everyone should know how to speak up and be heard. Poet John Osborne will be in the building too, giving his witty and charming take on food and drink, as will Dr Matt Wilkinson, a zoologist based at the University of Cambridge. Author of

Restless Creatures: The Story of Life in Ten Movements , he will explore the limits of evolution’s creative power in his talk, Impossible Creatures. Fellow zoologist, broadcaster, author and founder of the Ugly Animal Society, Simon Watt is offering a talk all about the least aesthetically pleasing animals out there, to discover why we find them so fascinating. A major highlight of the event is an appearance from Sunday Papers Live veterans Son & Sons. As the London Sunday Papers crossword editors for the past five years, Son & Sons present their hilarious live crossword. Basically, imagine a crossword with no clues – then two classically trained actors performing the clues. You can even win a dubious prize for completing the clues the fastest, so make sure you have your pens at the ready. In terms of food, Sunday Papers Live is once again teaming up with Cambridge’s Bread & Meat. The indie favourite has designed some sumptuous Sunday roast- style gourmet sandwiches especially for the event, with both vegetarians and vegans being catered for. Guests can

choose either roast British beef roll or a mixed roast vegetable sandwich with fresh salsa verde. The Union’s 1815 Bar is offering a selection of wines, beers and prosecco, along with mimosas and the event’s classic choice: bloody marys. Tea, coffee and soft drinks are also available throughout the event, as well as some gourmet snacks. Along with all of that, you can also look forward to a walk with Cambridge on Foot, where you can learn intriguing facts about the city with one of the entertaining guides. Make sure you sign up when you arrive so as not to miss out. There will also be an arts and crafts table, where you can enjoy some creative arts activities all through the afternoon. Live music is set to be on offer, too – keep an eye on the event’s website and social media for updates. Tickets for Sunday Papers Live include all of the above talks, performances and entertainment, as well as the guided walk and art activities. They can be found on the organiser’s website and are priced at £15. mylittlefestival.uk

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